Layard sentence example

layard
  • Many of the specimens discovered by Layard at Nineveh have all the appearance of being Roman, and were no doubt derived from the Roman colony, Niniva Claudiopolis, which occupied the same site.
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  • Layard at Nineveh opened up a new world, coinciding as they did with the successful decipherment of the cuneiform system of writing.
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  • Layard's discovery of the library of Assurbani-pal put the materials for reconstructing the ancient life and history of Assyria and Babylonia into the hands of scholars.
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  • A crystal lens, turned on the lathe, was discovered by Layard at Nimrud along with glass vases bearing the name of Sargon; this will explain the excessive minuteness of some of the writing on the Assyrian tablets, and a lens may also have been used in the observation of the heavens.
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  • Layard in the palace of Assur-bani-pal at Kuyunjik (Nineveh), as long ago as 1851 and noticed then as in a " doubtful character," were compared by Hayes Ward and found to be of the Hamathite class.
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  • Layard, of the Ceylon Civil Service, was the son of Charles Peter Layard, dean of Bristol, and grandson of Daniel Peter Layard, the physician.
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  • In 1845, encouraged and assisted by Canning, Layard left Constantinople to make those explorations among the ruins of Assyria with which his name is chiefly associated.
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  • Layard remained in the neighbourhood of Mosul, carrying on excavations at Kuyunjik and Nimrud, and investigating the condition of various tribes, until 1847; and, returning to England in 1848, published Nineveh and its Remains: with an Account of a Visit to the Chaldaean Christians of Kurdistan, and the Yezidis, or Devil-worshippers; and an Inquiry into the Manners and Arts of the Ancient Assyrians (2 vols.,1848-1849).
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  • During these expeditions, often in circumstances of great difficulty, Layard despatched to England the splendid specimens which now form the greater part of the collection of Assyrian antiquities in the British Museum.
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  • Apart from the archaeological value of his work in identifying Kuyunjik as the site of Nineveh, and in providing a great mass of materials for scholars to work upon, these two books of Layard's are among the bestwritten books of travel in the language.
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  • Layard now turned to politics.
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  • Layard's political life was somewhat stormy.
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  • Layard retired to Venice, where he devoted much of his time to collecting pictures of the Venetian school, and to writing on Italian art.
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  • Layard also from time to time contributed papers to various learned societies, including the Huguenot Society, of which he was first president.
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  • Early in the 'forties the Frenchman Botta, quickly followed by Sir Henry Layard, began making excavations on the site of ancient Nineveh, the name and fame of which were a tradition having scarcely more than mythical status.
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  • Meanwhile, the material found by Botta and Layard, and other successors, in the ruins of Nineveh, has been constantly augmented through the efforts of companies of other investigators, and not merely Assyrian, but much earlier Babylonian and Chaldaean texts in the greatest profusion have been brought to the various museums of Europe and America.
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  • The story of the books now spoken of as the "Creation" and "Deluge" tablets of the Assyrians, in the British Museum, which were discovered in the ruins of Nineveh by Layard and by George Smith, has been familiar to every one for a good many years.
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  • Layard, the habits of the Cape Promerops, its mode of nidification, and the character of its eggs are very unlike those of the ordinary Nectariniidae.
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  • See Layard, Ninevah and its Remains (London, 1850); Menant, Les Ye'zidis (Paris, 1892).
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  • Here Layard conducted excavations from 1845 to 1847, and again from 1849 to 1851.
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  • But while supplementing in some important respects Layard's excavations, this later work added relatively little to his discoveries whether of objects or of facts.
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  • Layard at Kuyunjik (1845-1847 and 1849-1851) definitely located the city, in confirmation of ancient tradition and the identifications of Rich and others.
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  • Layard, through his assistant Hormuzd Rassam, devoted two or three days to excavating on the site, but owing to the want of pasturage and the fear of Bedouin attacks he left the spot after finding a broken clay cylinder 1 Cf.
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  • He had already shown a keen interest in the explorations of Layard and Rawlinson, and during the next few years he devoted all his spare time to studying the cuneiform inscriptions at the British Museum.
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  • On the fifth day a telegram from Mr Layard was published announcing that the Russians were nearing Constantinople.
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  • His son, Paul Emile Botta (1802-1870), was a distinguished traveller and Assyrian archaeologist, whose excavations at Khorsabad (1843) were among the first efforts in the line of investigation afterwards pursued by Layard.
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  • Layard in 1851, which served, however, by means of the inscribed bricks discovered, to identify the site.
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  • A convex lens of rockcrystal was found by Layard among the ruins of the palace of Nimrud; Seneca describes hollow spheres of glass filled with water as being commonly used as magnifiers.
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  • Layard's handy Birdsof South Africa (8vo, 1867), though by no means free from faults, has much to recommend it.
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