Launceston sentence example

launceston
  • The principal cities and towns are Sydney (pop. 530,000), Newcastle, Broken Hill, Parramatta, Goulburn, Maitland, Bathurst, Orange, Lithgow, Tamworth, Grafton, Wagga and Albury, in New South Wales; Melbourne (pop. 511,900), Ballarat, Bendigo, Geelong, Eaglehawk, Warrnambool, Castlemaine, and Stawell in Victoria; Brisbane (pop. 128,000), Rockhampton, Maryborough, Townsville, Gympie, Ipswich, and Toowoomba in Queensland; Adelaide (pop. about 175,000), Port Adelaide and Port Pirie in South Australia; Perth (pop. 56,000), Fremantle, and Kalgoorlie in Western Australia; and Hobart (pop. 35,500) and Launceston in Tasmania.
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  • Richard transferred the assizes from Launceston to Lostwithiel.
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  • In 1386 the assizes were transferred back to Launceston.
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  • The harbour, sheltered by a breakwater, will admit vessels of 300 tons at high water; and the river has been dammed to form a basin for the canal which runs to Launceston.
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  • In 1819 the first conference was held at Launceston.
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  • It would be here out of place to follow with any minuteness the details of his subsequent imprisonments, such as that at Carlisle in 1653; London 1654; Launceston 1656; Lancaster 1660, and again in 1663, whence he was taken to Scarborough in 1665; and Worcester 1673.
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  • Hugh son of Odo Treverbyn gave West Looe the privileges enjoyed by Helston and Launceston.
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  • The trade of Launceston is chiefly agricultural, but there are tanneries and iron foundries.
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  • At the time of the Domesday survey the canons of St Stephen held Launceston, and the count of Mortain held Dunheved.
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  • In 1555 Dunheved, otherwise Launceston, received a charter of incorporation, the common council to consist of a mayor, 8 aldermen and a recorder.
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  • In 1832 Launceston was shorn of one of its members, and in 1885 merged in the county.
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  • Launceston was the assize town until Earl Richard, having built a palace at Restormel, removed the assize to Lostwithiel.
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  • In 1386 Launceston regained the privilege by royal charter.
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  • Launceston has never had a staple industry.
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  • Leaving India for the last time in 1830, he shortly after his arrival in England entered parliament as member for Launceston, and was an active opponent of the Reform Bill.
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  • In 1240 he constituted Liskeard a free borough and its burgesses freemen with all the liberties enjoyed by the burgesses of Launceston and Helston.
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  • Penal establishments were formed at Newcastle in New South Wales, at Hobart and Launceston in Tasmania, and an unsuccessful attempt was made to colonize Port Phillip. The most noteworthy incident in the first decade of the 19th century was the forcible deportation by the officers of the New South Wales Corps, a regiment raised in England for service in the colony, of the governor, Captain Bligh, R.N., the naval officer identified with the mutiny of the " Bounty."
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  • A memorial tablet, with an inscription by Archbishop Benson, is placed in the Cathedral at Truro; and Mr Passmore Edwards erected a public institute in his honour at Launceston, near his birthplace.
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  • In 1840 he was promoted to be a judge of the supreme court; but within two years he resigned his seat on the bench, removed to England, and in 1859 entered parliament as the representative of Launceston, in the Conservative interest.
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  • But the tenure of his seat for Launceston was brought to an end by the dissolution of the parliament in 1865, and he did not again offer himself to the constituency.
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  • Further east are Emu Bay, Port Frederick, Port Sorell and Port Dalrymple, into which flows the Tamar river, on which Launceston is situated.
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  • The Macquarie, receiving the Elizabeth and Lake, falls into the South Esk, which unites with the North Esk to form the Tamar at Launceston.
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  • The mean at Hobart was 54.4°, at Launceston 56.6° and at Oatlands, which is in the centre of the island and 1400 ft.
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  • The chief towns are Hobart (pop. 35,000) and Launceston (pop. 22,500).
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  • Instruction is compulsory upon children over seven years of age and under thirteen years in the towns of Hobart and Launceston, but not in the rural districts.
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  • The outstanding loans of municipalities amount to £697.133, of which the greater portion is represented by the indebtedness of the two chief cities, Hobart and Launceston.
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  • Beaconsfield is the chief goldfield, 26 miles north-west of Launceston.
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  • The chief ports of the state are Hobart, where the shipping entered in 1905 amounted to 645,000 tons, and Launceston, 223,000 tons;.
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  • Weary travelers using the turnpike between Launceston and Bodmin would stay at the Inn after having crossed the wild and treacherous moor.
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  • The mean at Hobart was 54.4°, at Launceston 56.6° and at Oatlands, which is in the centre of the island and 1400 ft.
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