Landgraf sentence example

landgraf
  • Landgraf, Die "Vita Alexandri".
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  • Schwartz, Landgraf Friedrich V.
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  • Reid's Academica (London, 1885) and Landgraf's Pro Sext.
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  • Landgraf, from Land, " a country" and Graf, " count"), a German title of nobility surviving from the times of the Holy Roman Empire.
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  • von Rommel, Philipp der Grossmuthige (Giessen, 1830); Briefwechsel Landgraf Philipps mit Bucer, edited by M.
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  • Schwarz, Landgraf Philipp von Hessen and die Packschen Handel (Leipzig, 1881); J.
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  • Varrentrapp, Landgraf Philipp von Hessen and die Universitdt Marburg (Cassel, 1904); Von Drach and Konnecke, Die Bildnisse Philipps des Grossmutigen (Cassel, 1905); Festschrift zum Gedachtnis Philipps, published by the Verein fur hessische Geschichte and Landeskunde (Cassel, 1904); and Philipp der Grossmutige, Beitrage zur Geschichte seines Lebens and seiner Zeit, published by the Historischer Verein fur das Grossherzogtum Hessen (Marburg, 1904).
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  • He was, however, befriended by Jacob Sturm, who recommended him to the Landgraf Philip of Hesse, the most liberal of the German reforming princes.
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  • This scheme was submitted by Philip to a synod at Homburg; but Luther intervened and persuaded the Landgraf to abandon it.
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  • Philip continued to favour Lambert, who was appointed professor and head of the theological faculty in the Landgraf's new university of Marburg.
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  • 1903); Pichler, Chronik des Hof-und National Theaters in Mannheim (Mannheim, 1879); Landgraf, Mannheim and Ludwigshafen (Zurich, 1890); Die wirthschaftliche Bedeutung Mannheims, published by the Mannheim Chamber of Commerce (Mannheim, 1905); the Forschungen zur Geschichte Mannheims and der Pfalz, published by the Mannheimer Altertumsverein (Leipzig, 1898); and the annual Chronik der Hauptstadt Mannheim (1901 seq.).
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  • The first step towards this was the concession to the counts of the military prerogatives of dukes, a right enjoyed from the first by the counts of the marches (see Margrave), then given to counts palatine (see Palatine) and, finally, to other counts, who assumed by reason of it the style of landgrave (Landgraf, i.e.
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