Laertius sentence example

laertius
  • Diogenes Laertius vi.
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  • Diogenes Laertius says that his works filled ten volumes, but of these fragments only remain.
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  • Of the very numerous works of Favorinus, we possess only a few fragments (unless the KopcvOcaKOs Xoryos attributed to his tutor Dio Chrysostom is by him), preserved by Aulus Gellius, Diogenes Laertius, Philostratus, and SuIdas, the second of whom borrows from his HavroSairrt iiropca (miscellaneous history) and his 'Airo,uvmuovEUµara (memoirs).
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  • His writings (Diogenes Laertius, ix.
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  • Laertius v.
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  • Diogenes Laertius (ii.
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  • A smaller compilation, chiefly from Diogenes Laertius and Suidas, with a similar title, is the work of an unknown author of the 11th or 12th century.
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  • Besides Truth, and the book Of the Gods which caused his condemnation at Athens, Diogenes Laertius attributes to him treatises on political, ethical, educational and rhetorical subjects.
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  • Laertius iv.
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  • Diogenes Laertius preserves a tradition that it was he, not Crito, who offered to help Socrates to escape from prison.
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  • According to Diogenes Laertius, who credits him with an undoubtedly spurious letter to Croesus (with whom his connexion was probably legendary), Pittacus was a writer of elegiac poems, from which he quotes five lines.
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  • 2; Indica, 32; Diogenes Laertius vi.
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  • Diogenes Laertius quotes a letter in which Cleobulus invites Solon to take refuge with him against Peisistratus; and this would imply that he was alive in 560 B.C. He is said to have held advanced views as to female education, and he was the father of the wise Cleobuline, whose riddles were not less famous than his own (Diogenes Laertius i.
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  • Diogenes Laertius says, "If the gods use dialectic, they can use none other than that of Chrysippus"; A yap v Xpuvciriros, oinc av i v Ewa, ("Without Chrysippus, there had been no Porch").
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  • His life was written by Diogenes Laertius.
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  • He is mentioned both by Diogenes Laertius and by Iamblichus, but nothing is known of his life.
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  • Aristotle'S Life This account is practically repeated by Diogenes Laertius in his Life of Aristotle, on the authority of the Chronicles of Apollodorus, who lived in the 2nd century B.C. Starting then from this tradition, near enough to the time, we can confidently divide Aristotle's career into four periods: his youth under his parents till his eighteenth year; his philosophical education under Plato at Athens till his thirty-eighth year; his travels in the Greek world till his fiftieth year; and his philosophical teaching in the Lyceum till his departure to Chalcis and his death in his sixtythird year.
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  • His will, which was quoted by Hermippus, and, as afterwards quoted by Diogenes Laertius, has come down to us, though perhaps not complete, supplies some further details, as follows: - Antipater is to be executor with others.
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  • It is not always certain which were dialogues, which didactic like Aristotle's later works; but by comparing those which were certainly dialogues with their companions in the list of Aristotle's books as given by Diogenes Laertius, we may conclude with Bernays that the books occurring first in that list were dialogues.
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  • On the other hand, there are the curious and puzzling catalogues of Aristotelian books, one given by Diogenes Laertius, another by an anonymous commentator (perhaps Hesychius of Miletus) quoted in the notes of Gilles Menage on Diogenes Laertius, and known as " Anonymus Menagii," and a third copied by two Arabian writers from Ptolemy, perhaps King Ptolemy Philadelphus, son of the founder of the library at Alexandria.
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  • The probability is that the Nicomachean Ethics is a collection of separate discourses worked up into a tolerably systematic treatise; and the interesting point is that these discourses correspond to separate titles in the list of Diogenes Laertius (7rep1 KaXou, irepi Sucalcwv, irepi q5tXias, 7repi )Sovfjs, and 7repi ijlovwv).
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  • Again, it is not unlikely that the Politics was arranged in the traditional order of books by Theophrastus, and that this is the meaning of the curious title occurring in the list of Aristotle's works as given by Diogenes Laertius, rroXcTCKns IcKpoavEC.os ws OeocApa6Tov a'13'y'8'E'srrt', which agrees with the Politics in having eight books.
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  • But the Rhetoric to Alexander was considered spurious by Erasmus, for the inadequate reasons that it has a preface and is not mentioned in the list of Diogenes Laertius, and was assigned by Petrus Victorius, in his preface to the Rhetoric, to Anaximenes.
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  • 438) and Diogenes Laertius (iv.
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  • 18; Diogenes Laertius iv.
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  • 14 Authors differ in their views as to its authenticity, but Diogenes Laertius (v.
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  • Now as to this there is quite a remarkable unanimity in the testimony of the ancients, and the evidence is of the strongest kind, ascending to Herodotus, and, according to the account of Diogenes Laertius, even to Xenophanes, who was an Ionian, and not much later than Thales.
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  • Many anecdotes, amusing rather than instructive, are related of him, which have been handed down by Diogenes Laertius and other writers.
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  • Further, we learn from Diogenes Laertius (i.
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  • This is the received interpretation of the passage in Diogenes Laertius, i.
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  • Diogenes Laertius in his account of the Stoics (vii.85, Tr] y OE - Opµrt y 4ao-c TO TO TripeEv EaITO) uses the phrase TnpEiv EavrO to describe the instinct for self-preservation, the inward harmony of Chrysippus, the recognition of which is auve1,50ves.
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  • From a life by Diogenes Laertius, we learn that he studied at Athens under Plato, but, being dismissed, passed over into Egypt, where he remained for sixteen months with the priests of Heliopolis.
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  • The stories of the Stoics, who sought to refute the views of Epicurus by an appeal to his alleged antecedents and habits, were no doubt in the main, as Diogenes Laertius says, the stories of maniacs.
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  • - The chief ancient accounts of Epicurus are in the tenth book of Diogenes Laertius, in Lucretius, and in several treatises of Cicero and Plutarch.
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  • There is the Mithradates who presented the Academy with a statue of Plato by Silanion, not improbably identical (though the supposition implies a correction in the text of Diogenes Laertius) with that Mithradates who, together with his father Ariobarzanes, received the citizenship of Athens (Dem.
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  • MELISSUS OF SAMOS, Greek philosopher of the Eleatic School, was born probably not later than 470 B.C. According to Diogenes Laertius, ix.
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  • This sort of thought, which appears very early in Egypt (2000 B.C. or earlier), and relatively early among the Greeks (in the sayings of Thales and Solon as reported by Diogenes Laertius), was of late growth among the Hebrews.
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  • While tending his father's sheep, he is said to have fallen into a deep sleep in the Dictaean cave near Cnossus where he lived, from which he did not awake for fifty-seven years (Diogenes Laertius i.
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  • ARCHELAUS OF MILETUS, Greek philosopher of the 5th century B.C., was born probably at Athens, though Diogenes Laertius (ii.
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  • No fragments of Archelaus remain; his doctrines have to be extracted from Diogenes Laertius, Simplicius, Plutarch and Hippolytus.
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  • 69; Diogenes Laertius i.
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  • This recurs in a different form in the statement of Diogenes Laertius (i.
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  • Finally, Diogenes Laertius (i.
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  • Soter in an expedition to Syria, and sailed up the Nile with him as far as Thebes (Diogenes Laertius ix.
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  • Plato (Theaetetus, 15 2 E) puts him at the head of the masters of comedy, coupling his name with Homer and, according to a remark in Diogenes Laertius, Plato was indebted to Epicharmus for much of his philosophy.
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  • Epicharmus is the subject of articles in Suidas and Diogenes Laertius (viii.
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  • We learn much more about the Stoic system from the scanty fragments of the first founders, 4 or even from the epitomes of Diogenes Laertius and Stobaeus, than from these writers.
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  • His works, according to Diogenes Laertius, numbered seventytwo, and were characterized by a purity of style which compares favourably with that of Plato.
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  • The tradition which assigns the first employment of the Greek word 4aAoa041a to Pythagoras has hardly any claim to be regarded as authentic; and the somewhat self-conscious modesty to which Diogenes Laertius attributes the choice of the designation is, in all probability, a piece of etymology crystallized into narrative.
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  • The letters ascribed to him by Diogenes Laertius are undoubtedly spurious.
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  • 393; Diogenes Laertius, De vitis clarorum philosophorum, i.
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  • Diogenes Laertius says that Anniceris ransomed Plato from Dionysius, tyrant of Syracuse, for twenty minas.
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  • According to Diogenes Laertius he was " in his prime " 504-500 B.C., and would thus seem to have been born about 539 Plato indeed (Parmenides, 127 B) makes Socrates see and hear Parmenides when the latter was about sixty-five years of age, in which case he cannot have been born before 519; but in the absence of evidence that any such meeting took place this may be regarded as one of Plato's anachronisms. However this may be, Parmenides was a contemporary, probably a younger contemporary, of Heraclitus, with whom the first succession of physicists ended, while Empedocles and Anaxagoras, with whom the second succession of physicists began, were very much his juniors.
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  • Three dialogues, the E0M s, the Ipiwt os and the ]Iiva or Tabula, are attributed to him by Suidas and Diogenes Laertius.
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  • The principal fragments of Cleanthes's works are contained in Diogenes Laertius and Stobaeus; some may be found in Cicero and Seneca.
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  • See Diogenes Laertius x.
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  • The work was well received, and two years later appeared his commentary on the tenth book of Diogenes Laertius, De vita, moribus, et placitis Epicuri, seu Animadversiones in X.
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  • The first two are occupied entirely with his Syntagma philosophicum; the third contains his critical writings on Epicurus, Aristotle, Descartes, Fludd and Lord Herbert, with some occasional pieces on certain problems of physics; the fourth, his Institutio astronomica, and his Commentarii de rebus celestibus; the fifth, his commentary on the tenth book of Diogenes Laertius, the biographies of Epicurus, N.
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  • Diogenes Laertius (ix.
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  • The trick was discovered, and Heraclides received only ridicule instead of divine honours (Diogenes Laertius v.
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  • Many of them upheld the principle of community of wives (see Diogenes Laertius vi.
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  • By his eighth year he had read Aesop's Fables, Xenophon's Anabasis, and the whole of Herodotus, and was acquainted with Lucian, Diogenes Laertius, Isocrates and six dialogues of Plato (see his Autobiography).
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  • MENEDEMUS, Greek philosopher, and founder of the Eretrian school of thought, was born at Eretria about 350 and died between 278 and 275 B.C. Though of noble birth, he worked as builder and tentmaker until he was sent with a military expedition to Megara, where, according to Diogenes Laertius, he heard Plato and resolved to devote himself to philosophy.
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  • According to Diogenes Laertius, he divided the virtues into two kinds, those founded on scientific intellectual principles (i.e.
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  • Specimens of his apophthegms may be found in Diogenes Laertius and the florilegium of Stobaeus, while there are traces of his influence in Seneca.
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  • Diogenes Laertius says that he died of excessive drinking, but the testimony of others (e.g.
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  • He is said by Herodotus and others to have been of Phoenician extraction, but the more common account (see Diogenes Laertius) is that he was a native Milesian of noble birth.
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  • He became a close friend of Isidore, succeeded him as head of the school in Athens, and wrote his biography, part of which is preserved in the Bibliotheca of Photius (see appendix to the Didot edition of Diogenes Laertius).
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  • Again, the account of the Hipparchus is contradicted by Diogenes Laertius, who says that Solon provided for the due recitation of the Homeric poems. The only good authorities as to this point are the orators Lycurgus and Isocrates, who mention the law prescribing the recitation, but do not say when or by whom it was enacted.
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