Khorasan sentence example

khorasan
  • The province used to be one of the administrative divisions of Khorasan, but is now a separate province, with a governor appointed by the shah.
    0
    0
  • During the latter Sassanids it is seldom mentioned, and when the Arabs came to Khorasan (641-642) it was of so little importance that, as Tabari relates, it did not even have a garrison.
    0
    0
  • Five-sixths of these coins preserved at Stockholm were from the mints of the Samanian dynasty, which reigned in Khorasan and Transoxiana from about A.D.
    0
    0
  • In the midst of general anarchy in Persia, he was proclaimed ruler of Khorasan, and obtained possession of the Persian throne in 1586.
    0
    0
  • Determined to raise the fallen fortunes of his country, he first directed his efforts against the predatory Uzbegs, who occupied and harassed Khorasan.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • His father belonged to the class of Dihkans (the old native country families and landed proprietors of Persia, who had preserved their influence and status under the A ab rule), and possessed an estate in the neighbourhood of Cus (in Khorasan).
    0
    0
  • His "Book of Kings" was completed in the year 260 of the Hegira, and was freely circulated in Khorasan and Irak.
    0
    0
  • It corresponds to the modern Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • Under the caliphate of Mamun, Saman, a Persian noble of Balkh, who was a close friend of the Arab governor of Khorasan, Asad b.
    0
    0
  • (997, 387 A.H.), and Mahmud (q.v.), confronted with an internal contest against his own brother Isma`il, had to withdraw his attention for a short time from the affairs in Khorasan and Transoxiana.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He succeeded his father Da'ud as ruler of Khorasan in 1059, and his uncle Togrul Bey as sultan of Oran in 1063, and thus became sole monarch of Persia from the river Oxus to the Tigris.
    0
    0
  • Bagdad also lies on a natural line of communication between Persia and the west, the ancient caravan route from Khorasan debouching from the mountains at this point, while another natural caravan route led up the Euphrates to Syria and the Mediterranean and still another up the Tigris to Armenia and the Black Sea.
    0
    0
  • The hostility he encountered in the propagation of these new religious ideas after his return to Khorasan in 1052 and Sunnite fanaticism compelled him at last to flee, and after many wanderings he found a refuge in Yumgan (about 1060) in the mountains of Badakshan, where he spent as a hermit the last decades of his life, and gathered round him a considerable number of devoted adherents, who have handed down his doctrines to succeeding generations.
    0
    0
  • Most of Nasir's lyrical poems - were composed in his retirement, and their chief topics are - an enthusiastic praise of `Ali, his descendants, and Mostansir in particular; passionate outcries against Khorasan and its rulers, who had driven him from house and home; the highest satisfaction with the quiet solitude of Yumgan; and utter despondency again in seeing himself despised by his former associates and for ever excluded from participation in the glorious contest of life.
    0
    0
  • With regard to the history of Irak in particular he was deemed to have the best information, and for this subject he is Tabari's chief source, just as Madaini, a younger contemporary of Wagidi, is followed by preference in all that relates to Khorasan.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • 1 000, speaks of them as comprising the bulk of the population of Syria, Irak and Khorasan, and as superior to the orthodox in intellectual ability.
    0
    0
  • They showed a zeal for evangelization which resulted in the establishment of their influence throughout Asia, as is seen from the bishoprics founded not only in Syria, Armenia, Arabia and Persia, but at Halavan in Media, Mer y in Khorasan, Herat, Tashkent, Samarkand, Baluk, Kashgar, and even at Kambaluk (Pekin) and Singan fu Hsi`en fu in China, and Kaljana and Kranganore in India.
    0
    0
  • He was a scholar of the traditionalist Bukhari, and in his search for traditions travelled through Khorasan, Irak and Hejaz.
    0
    0
  • From that time until his death in 1881 the Aga Khan, while leading the life of a peaceful and peacemaking citizen, under the protection of British rule, continued to discharge his sacerdotal functions, not only among his followers in India, but towards the more numerous communities which acknowledged his religious sway in distant countries, such as Afghanistan, Khorasan, Persia, Arabia, Central Asia, and even distant Syria and Morocco.
    0
    0
  • Till the year 1079 the Persian year resembled that of the ancient Egyptians, consisting of 365 days without intercalation; but at that time the Persian calendar was reformed by Jelal ud-Din Malik Shah, sultan of Khorasan, and a method of intercalation adopted which, though less convenient, is considerably more accurate than the Julian.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Under the Tahirids of Khorasan, the Saffarids of Seistan and the Samanids of Bokhara, it flourished for some centuries in peace and progressive prosperity; but during the succeeding rule of the Ghaznevid kings its metropolitan character was for a time obscured by the celebrity of the neighbouring capital of Ghazni, until finally in the reign of Sultan Sanjar of Mer y about 1157 the city was entirely destroyed by an irruption of the Ghuzz, the predecessors, in race as well as in habitat, of the modern Turkomans.
    0
    0
  • Though the Gur Khan himself is not described as having extended his conquests into Persia, the shah of Kharezm followed up the victory by invading Khorasan and plundering the cities and treasuries of Sanjar.
    0
    0
  • Bujnurd, a town of Persia, in the province of Khorasan, in a fertile plain encompassed by hills, in 37° 29' N., 57° 21' E., at an elevation of 3600 ft.
    0
    0
  • Barmak, the founder of the family, was a Persian fire-worshipper, and is supposed to have been a native of Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • In 994 Mahmud was made governor of Khorasan, with the title of Saif addaula (ud-daula) ("Sword of the State") by thee Samanid Nuh II.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • When he was in the Punjab at this time, he heard of the invasion of Khorasan by the Ilek Khan Nasr I.
    0
    0
  • Allying himself both in cause and by family connexion with Kurgan, the dethroner and destroyer of Kazan, chief of the western Jagatai, he was deputed to invade Khorasan at the head of a thousand horse.
    0
    0
  • Miller's translations includes a long extract of Mani's book called Schapurakan, parts of his Evangelium, and epistles, with liturgies, hymns and prayers, for Tatar Khans who espoused the faith in Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • The Discovery Of The Period Of Thirty Three Years Is Ascribed To Omar Khayyam, One Of The Eight Astronomers Appointed Byjelal Ud Din Malik Shah, Sultan Of Khorasan, To Reform Or Construct A Calendar, About The Year 1079 Of Our Era.
    0
    0
  • Mahommed had been successful by the aid of his brother Sinjar, who from the year 1097 held the province of Khorasan with the capital Merv.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • (767), we find it transferred without question to the mystical brotherhood which appears in Khorasan under Abu Sa'id about 200 A.H.
    0
    0
  • Christianity penetrated to Khorasan and Bactria at an early date; episcopal sees are said to have existed at Mer y and Samarkand in the 4th and 5th centuries, and Cosmas (c. 545) testifies to the spread of Christianity among the Bactrians and Huns.
    0
    0
  • In 711-712 Mahommedan troops were conducted by Kotaiba, the governor of Khorasan, into the province of Khwarizm (Khiva), after subjugating which they advanced on Bokhara and Samarkand, the ancient Sogdiana, and are said to have even reached Ferghana and Kashgar, but no occupation then ensued.
    0
    0
  • They held Kunduz, Balkh, Khwarizm and Khorasan, and for a time Badakshan also; but Badakshan was soon won by the emperor Baber, and in 1529 was bestowed on his cousin Suleiman, who by 1555 had established his rule over much of the region between the Oxus and the Hindu Kush.
    0
    0
  • Independent monarchs established themselves in Africa and Khorasan (Spain had remained Omayyad throughout), and in the north-west the Greeks successfully encroached.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This was that of the Seljuk Turkomans from Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • Having long suffered from a terrible disease, he died in 1773, bequeathing to his son Timur a dominion which embraced not only Afghanistan to its utmost limits, but the Punjab, Kashmir and Turkestan to the Oxus, with Sind, Baluchistan and Khorasan as tributary governments.
    0
    0
  • The Arabic historians are still absorbed by the events in Irak and Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • The first army sent by Ziyad into Khorasan recaptured Merv, Herat and Balkh, conquered Tokharistan and advanced as far as the Oxus.
    0
    0
  • Sa`id, son of the caliph Othman, whom Moawiya made governor of Khorasan, in 674 marched against Samarkand.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The latter loaded him with honours and made him governor of Khorasan, whence he directed several expeditions into Transoxiana.
    0
    0
  • In the east the realm of Islam had been very much extended under the reign of Moawiya, when Ziyad was governor of Irak and Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • When, in 697, Hajjaj gave the government of Khorasan to Mohallab, he committed that of Sijistan (Seistan) to Obaidallah b.
    0
    0
  • His partisans fled before `Omara's army and penetrated into Khorasan, where they were disarmed by the governor Yazid, son of the celebrated Mohallab, who had died in the year 701.
    0
    0
  • Mohallab was soon after deprived of the government of Khorasan, Majjaj accusing him of partiality towards the rebels of Yemenite extraction.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Mohallab, whom he had recalled from Khorasan, and imprisoned, had escaped and put himself under the protection of Suleiman, who made himself surety for the fine to which Yazid had been condemned.
    0
    0
  • Moslim, the powerful governor of Khorasan, tried to anticipate the caliph by a revolt, but a conspiracy was formed against him, which ended in his murder.
    0
    0
  • He therefore asked the caliph to give him the governorship of Khorasan also, and took his residence in Merv, where he was free from control.
    0
    0
  • On his return to Khorasan he set on foot a series of new expeditions against Jorjan and Tabaristan, with only partial success.
    0
    0
  • Abbas the names of the chiefs of the Shia in Irak and Khorasan, and disclosed his way of corresponding with them.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In North Africa particularly, and in Khorasan the effect of Omar's proclamation was that a great multitude embraced Islam.
    0
    0
  • Ahwaz (Khuzistan), Fars and Kirman were easily subdued, but in Khorasan the Azd could not prevail over the Tamim, who were loyal to the caliph.
    0
    0
  • Maslama was rewarded with the governorship of Irak and Khorasan, but was soon replaced by Omar b.
    0
    0
  • In these years the antagonism between Qais (Modar) and Yemenites became more and more acute, especially in Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • Hobaira, to supply the deficiency, ordered the prefect of Khorasan, Sa`id-al-Harashi, to take tribute from the Sogdians in Transoxiana, who had embraced Islam on the promise of Omar II.
    0
    0
  • His first care was to put an end to the tyrannical rule of the Qaisites (Modarites) in Irak and Khorasan by dismissing Omar b.
    0
    0
  • His son Yahya, still a youth, fled to Balkh in Khorasan, but was discovered at last and hunted down, till he fell sword in hand under Walid II.
    0
    0
  • In Khorasan also there were very serious disturbances.
    0
    0
  • Hisham then separated Khorasan from Irak and chose as governor of the former Nasr b.
    0
    0
  • Omar, the governor of Irak, being a Qaisite, was not only confirmed in his office, but received with it the supreme command of Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • Sayyar, the governor of Khorasan, had not yet decided whether he ought to take the oath of allegiance when Yazid died, after a reign of only five months and a half, on the 12th of Dhu'l-Ilijja A.x.
    0
    0
  • Ilanzala defeated his army; Ibn Moawiya fled to Khorasan, where he met his death; the chief of the Kharijites, Shaiban Yashkori went to eastern Arabia; Suleiman b.
    0
    0
  • But in the northeast, in Khorasan, meanwhile a storm had arisen, against which his resources and his wisdom were alike of no avail.
    0
    0
  • Sayyar did not at once acknowledge the Caliphate of Yazid III., but induced the Arab chiefs to accept himself as amir of Khorasan, until a caliph should be universally acknowledged.
    0
    0
  • Being a Tamimite, he belonged to the Moelar, on whom the government in Khorasan depended; but he aided the Yemenites to gain the upper hand of them.
    0
    0
  • He directed his energies primarily to Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • The missionaries had great success, especially among the non-Arabic inhabitants of Khorasan and Transoxiana.
    0
    0
  • To him, in 745-746,the management of affairs in Khorasan was entrusted, with instructions to consult in all weighty matters the head of the mission, the Arab Suleiman b.
    0
    0
  • Merwan had at last discovered who was the real chief of the movement in Khorasan, and had seized upon Ibrahim the Imam and imprisoned him at Harran.
    0
    0
  • Abu Jahm, the vizier (q.v.; also Mahommedan Institutions), or "helper," of Abu Moslim, advised that Abu Ja`far, the caliph's brother, should be sent to Khorasan to consult Abu Moslim.
    0
    0
  • Kathir, who had been the head of the propaganda in Khorasan, and had also expected that the Mandi would belong to the house of Ali.
    0
    0
  • It is said that Abu Ja`far, whilst in Khorasan, was so impressed by the unlimited power of Abu Moslim, and saw so clearly that, though he called his brother and himself his masters, he considered them as his creatures, that he vowed his death at the first opportunity.
    0
    0
  • In Bathaniya and the IIauran, in the north of Syria, in Mesopotamia and Irak Khorasan insurrections had to be put down with fire and sword.
    0
    0
  • The Abbasids, on the contrary, were a Persian dynasty, under which the Arab tribal system, as regulated by Omar, fell to pieces; the Persians of Khorasan were the real rulers, and the government became despotic as in the days of Chrosroes."
    0
    0
  • In Khorasan many people were discontented.
    0
    0
  • But Nicephorus, profiting by serious disturbances in Khorasan, broke the treaty again, and overran the country as far as Anazarba and Kanisat as-sauda ("the black church") on the frontier, where he took many prisoners, who were, however, recovered by the garrison of Mopsuestia.
    0
    0
  • The disturbances in Khorasan were caused by the malversations of the governor of that province, Ali b.
    0
    0
  • The caliph's hope that Rafi` would submit on condition of receiving a free pardon was not fulfilled, and he resolved to set out himself to Khorasan, taking with him his second son Mamun.
    0
    0
  • He even, in direct violation of Harun's will, led back the corps which was intended to occupy Khorasan under the authority of Mamun.
    0
    0
  • Mamun resolved to hold out, and found pretexts for remaining in Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • Amin immediately despatched to Khorasan an army of 40,000 under the command of Ali b.
    0
    0
  • `Isa, who had regained his former influence, and told the caliph that, at his coming to Khorasan, all the leading men would come over to his side.
    0
    0
  • He was here reinforced by troops sent from Khorasan under the command of Harthama b.
    0
    0
  • Harthama was ordered to return to Khorasan; Tahir was made governor of Mesopotamia and Syria, with the task of subduing Nasr b.
    0
    0
  • The former was decapitated, the latter was sent to Khorasan, the revolt in Arabia was quickly suppressed, and peace seemed within reach.
    0
    0
  • Tahir, fearing lest the caliph, not being able to endure the sight of the murderer of his brother, should change his mind towards him, contrived to get himself appointed governor of Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • When he returned thence, the caliph gave him the choice between the government of Khorasan and that of the northern provinces, where he would have to combat Babak the Khorramite.
    0
    0
  • During the civil war their power was steadily increasing, and spread not only over Azerbaijan, but also over Media (Jabal) and Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • His head was sent to Khorasan, his body was crucified.
    0
    0
  • A year later the province was reconquered by the Tahirid governor of Khorasan, so that Hasan was obliged to retreat for refuge to the land of the Dailam.
    0
    0
  • The empire was by this time practically reduced to the province of Bagdad; Khorasan and Transoxiana were in the hands of the Samanids, Fars in those of the Buyids; Kirman and Media were under independent sovereigns; the Hamdanids possessed Mesopotamia; the Sajids Armenia and Azerbaijan; the Ikshidites Egypt; as we have seen, the Fatimites Africa, the Carmathians Arabia.
    0
    0
  • At his death in 387 his son Mahmud conquered the whole of Khorasan and Sijistan, with a great part of India.
    0
    0
  • Already during the reign of Mahmud large bodies had passed the Oxus and spread over Khorasan and the adjacent countries.
    0
    0
  • In the winter1876-1877a disease which appears to have been plague appeared in two villages in the extreme north of the province of Khorasan, about 25 leagues from the south-east angle of the Caspian Sea.
    0
    0
  • Returning to the court of Uzbeg, at Sarai on the Volga, he crossed the steppes to Khwarizm and Bokhara; thence through Khorasan and Kabul, and over the Hindu Kush (to which he gives that name, its first occurrence).
    0
    0
  • It has a population of about io,000, post and telegraph offices, and a transit trade between western Khorasan and Astarabad.
    0
    0
  • (Russian trigonometrical survey), and ending in Khorasan, the great Elburz range presents on its southern, or inward, face a more or less abrupt scarp rising above immense gravel slopes, and reaches in some of its summits a height of nearly 13,000 ft.; and the peak of Demavend, north-west of Teheran, has a height of at least 18,000 ft.
    0
    0
  • There are several important ranges in Khorasan, and one of them, the Binalud, west of Meshed and north of Nishapur, has several peaks of 11,000 to 12,000 ft.
    0
    0
  • The fourth is a comparatively small area on the western frontier containing the basin of Lake Urmia, shut off from the rest of the inland drainage, and the fifth area takes in a part of Baluchistan, most of Kermgn, a part of Fars, all Yezd, Isfahan, Kashan, Kum, Irak, Khamseh, Kazvin, Teheran, Samnan, Damghan, Shahrud, Khorasan and the central desert regions.
    0
    0
  • The Gurgan rises on the Armutlu plateau in Khorasan east of Astarabad, and enters the Caspian in 37 4 N., northwest of Astarabad, after a course of about 200 m.
    0
    0
  • Khorasan to the Perso-Afghan border, its western limit being indicated by a long line to the northwest from near Shiraz, taking in the whole upper country to the Russian frontier and the Elburz; (2) the provinces south and south-west of the Caspian; (3) a narrow strip of wooded country south-west of the Zagros range, from the Diyala River in Turkey in Asia to Shiraz; (4) the Persian side of the Shatt-el-Arab, and Aralictan, east of the Tigris; and (5) the shores of the Persian Gulf and Baluchistan.
    0
    0
  • The Turkoman horse of Khorasan and the Atak is a large, bony and clumsy-looking quadruped, with marvellous power and endurance.
    0
    0
  • Stewart stated that the Khorasan camel is celebrated for its size and strength, that it has very long hair, and bears cold and exposure far better than the ordinary Arabian or Persian camel, and that, while the ordinary Persian camel only carries a load of some 320 lb and an Indian camel one of some 400 Ib, the Khorasan camel will carry from 600 to 700 lb.
    0
    0
  • The Kali and its smaller sizes, called Kaiicheh (in Europe, rugs), are chiefly made in Ferahan, Sultanabad (Irak), Khorasan, Kurdistan, Karadagh, Yezd, Kerman, and among the nomad tribes of southern Persia.
    0
    0
  • Of silk fabrics manufactured in Persia, principally in Khorasan, Kashan and Yezd, about 100,000 worth per annum is exported to Turkey, Russia and India.
    0
    0
  • Cotton is largely grown, principally in the central districts and Khorasan, and some qualities are excellent and command high prices in the European markets; 18,400 tons of raw cotton, valued at 838,787, were exported to Russia in I 906f 907.
    0
    0
  • The principal opium-producing districts are those of Shiraz, Isfahan, Yezd, Kerman, Khorasan, Burujird and Kermnshh.
    0
    0
  • It was sprung from a predatory nomad tribe (the Parnian Dahae, Scythians) which had established itself in Khorasan (Parthia), on the borders of civilization, and thence gradually annexed further districts as the political situation or the weakness of its neighbors allowed.
    0
    0
  • Yet it maintained itself not merely in the west, where its head resided at Babylonpropagating thence far into the Roman Empirebut also in the east, in Khorasan and beyond the bounds of the Sassanian dominion.
    0
    0
  • With this war is evidently connected the foundation of the great town New-Shapur (Nishapur) in Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • In the reign of Harun al-Rashid disturbances broke out in Khorasan which, were temporarily appeased by a visit from Harun himself.
    0
    0
  • His son and successor Mahmud (qv.) was attacked by a brother, Ismail, and retired from Khorasan (of which he had been governor).
    0
    0
  • The Samanids then fell under the power of the Tatar Ilkhans, but Mahmud returned, triumphed over both the Samanids and the Tatars, and assumed the independent title of sultan with authority over Khorasan, Transoxiana and parts of north-west India.
    0
    0
  • Sinjar himself lost all his dominions except Khorasan in wars with the Karakitai.
    0
    0
  • The former of these subdued Khorasan, Rai and Isfahan, while the latter brought practically all Persia under his sway, conquered Bokhara, Samarkand and Otrar, capital of the Karakitai, and had even made himself master of Ghazni when his career was stopped by the hordes of the Mongol Jenghiz Khan.
    0
    0
  • The Sarbadarids (so called from their motto Sar-ba-dar, Head to the Gibbet), descendants of Abd al-Razzak, who rebelled in Khorasan about 1337, enjoyed some measure of independence under twelve rulers till they also were destroyed by Timur (c. 1380).
    0
    0
  • The Beni Kurt (or Kart), who had governed in Khorasan from 1245, became independent in the early 1 4th century; they were abolished by Timur (c. 1383).
    0
    0
  • Khorasan and Mazandaran had submitted to him in 1381, Azerbaijan had shortly after followed their example, and Isfahan was seized in 1387.
    0
    0
  • In fact the uncle and nephew changed placesthe one quitting his government of Khorasan to take possession of the Central-Asian throne, the other con~ senting to become governor of the vacated Persian province and abandon the cares of the empire at Samarkand.
    0
    0
  • Babarnot the illustrious founder of the Mughal dynasty in India, but an elder member of the same housenext obtained possession of the sovereign power, and established himself in the government of Khorasan and the neighboring countries.
    0
    0
  • After him Abu Said, grandson of Miran Shah, and once governor of Fars, became a candidate for empire, and allied himself with the Uzbeg Tatars, seized Bokhara, entered Khorasan, and waged war upon the Turkoman tribe aforesaid, which, since the invasion of Azerbaijan, had, under Jahan Shah, overrun Irak, Fars and Kermgn, and pillaged Herat.
    0
    0
  • The second could not well be included in the first, because the Turkomans were in possession of the greater part of the Persian plateau, while the sultan was in Herat, to which Khorasan belonged.
    0
    0
  • Abbas, held possession of Khorasan; on the west the sultans troops again entered Azerbaijan and took Tabriz.
    0
    0
  • On the news of his death reaching Khorasan, Murshid Kuli Khan, leader of the Ustujulu Kizil-bash, who had made good in fight his claims to the guardianship of Abbas, at once conducted the young prince from that province to Kazvin, and occupied the royal city.
    0
    0
  • Shah Abbas the Great commenced his long and glorious reign (1586) by retracing his steps towards Khorasan, which bad been reinvaded by the Uzbegs almost immeAbbas the diately after his departure thence with the Kizil-bash Great.
    0
    0
  • But circumetances rendered impossible his immediate renewal of the Khorasan warfare.
    0
    0
  • In 1597 Abbas renewed operations against the Uzbegs, and succeeded in recovering from them Herat and Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • He strengthened his position in Khorasan by planting colonies of Kurdish horsemen on the frontier, or along what is called the atak or skirt of the Turkoman mountains north of Persia.
    0
    0
  • During his reign the Uzbegs were driven back from Khorasan, and a rebellion was suppressed in Gilan; but Kandahar was again handed over to the Moguls of Delhi, and Bagdad retaken from Persia by Sultan Muradboth serious national losses.
    0
    0
  • During his reign Khorasan was invaded by the ever-encroaching Uzbegs, the Kipchak Tatars plundered the shores of the Caspian, and the island of Kishm was taken by the Dutch; but the kingdom suffered otherwise no material loss.
    0
    0
  • In the meanwhile the Saduzai tribe revolted at Herat, and declared itself independent in 1717; the Kurds overran the country rous~d Hamadan; the Uzbegs desolated Khorasan; and the Arabs of Muscat seized the island of Bahrein and threatened Bander Abbasi.
    0
    0
  • With an army of 80,000 men he marched through Khorasan and Seistan to Kandahar, which city he blockaded ineffectually for a year; but it finally capitulated on the loss of the citadel.
    0
    0
  • At this juncture Abmad Shah Abdali reappeared in Persian Khorasan from Herat; he attacked and took possession of Meshed, slew Mir Alam, and, pledging the local chiefs to support the blinded prince in retaining the kingdom of his grandfather, returned to Afghanistan.
    0
    0
  • Lutf Ali Khan took refuge with the hospitable chief of Tabbas in the heart of Khorasan, where he succeeded in collecting a few followers; but advancing into Fars, he was again defeated, and forced to take refuge at Kandahar.
    0
    0
  • He occupied the K ~rm&in city of Kerman, then a flourishing commercial town, e half-way between the Persian Gulf and the province of Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • Khorasan could hardly be called an integral part of the shahs kingdom so long as it was under Operations even the nominal rule of the blind grandson of in Nadir.
    0
    0
  • But there had been continual dissatisfaction in the capital of Khorasan, and constant inroads upon it from without, which the royal puppet was unable to prevent.
    0
    0
  • Finally, he advanced into Khorasan with an army which appears to have met with no opposition save at Nishapur and Turbet, both of which places were taken, and when it reached Meshed, Nadir Mirza tendered his submission, which was accepted.
    0
    0
  • The revolt of Nadir Mirza had, as before explained, drawn the shahs attention to Khorasan in the early part of his reign; but, although quiet had for the moment been restored at Meshed by the presence of the royal camp, fresh grounds of complaint were urged against the rash but powerless prince, and recourse was had to extreme measures.
    0
    0
  • Yezd and Kerman were the first points of attack; Khorasan was afterwards entered by Samnan, or the main road from Teheran.
    0
    0
  • A member of the royal family, the asafu d-daula, governor of Khorasan, left his government to urge his candidature for the post.
    0
    0
  • As might have been anticipated, the hajji fell into the hands of Russia, represented by Count Simonich, who urged him to a fresh expedition into Khorasan and the siege of Herat.
    0
    0
  • Mahiati otherwise known as the chief of the Assassins; a new rupture with Turkey; the banishment of the asafud-daula, governor of Khorasan, followed by the insurrection and defeat of his son; and the rise of Bbiism (q.v).
    0
    0
  • The conqueror of Meshed, Murad Mirza, became afterwards himself the prince-governor of Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • In June 1893 Persia ceded to Russia the small but very fertile and strategically important district of Firuza and the adjacent lands between Baba Durmaz and Lutfabad on the northern frontier of Khorasan, and received in exchange the important village of Hissar and a strip of desert ground near Abbasabad on the frontier of Azerbaijan, which had become Russian territory in I 828, according to the Treaty of Turkmanchai.
    0
    0
  • In addition to these details the Fihrist mentions a tradition that he originally came from Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • 1 Nizam-ud-din, whose beautiful marble tomb is at Indarpat near Delhi, was, according to some authorities, an assassin of the secret society of Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • It is most largely produced in the districts of Ispahan, Shiraz, Yezd and Khonsar, and to a less extent in those of Khorasan, Kermanshah and Fars.
    0
    0
  • The produce of Ispahan and Fars is carried for exportation to Bushire, and that of Khorasan and Kirman and Yezd partly to Bushire and partly to Bandar-Abbas.
    0
    0
  • The surface of Khorasan thus consists mainly of highlands, saline, swampy deserts and upland valleys, some fertile and wellwatered.
    0
    0
  • Bander Abbasi has a lively trade, exporting much of the produce of central and south-eastern Persia and supplying imports to those districts and Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • When peace was made in 1828 Abbas then sought to restore order in the province of Khorasan, which was nominally under Persian supremacy, and while engaged in the task died at Meshed in 1833.
    0
    0
  • The plains and lowlands of the Turanian basin are subdivided by a line drawn from north-east to south-west along a slight range of hills running from the sources of the Ishim towards the south-east corner of the Caspian (Bujnurd and Elburz edge of Khorasan).
    0
    0
  • While still young he started on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and travelling by way of Tangut, Khotan, Kashgar, Talas in the Syr Dania valley, Khorasan, Maragha and Mosul, arrived at Ani in Armenia.
    0
    0
  • Of the socalled Arabian philosophers of the East, al-Farabi, Ibn-Sina and al-Ghazali were natives of Khorasan, Bokhara and the outlying provinces of north-eastern Persia; whilst al-Kindi, the earliest of them, sprang from Basra, on the Persian Gulf, on the debatable ground between the Semite and the Aryan.
    0
    0
  • The seat of empire had been transferred to Bagdad, on the highway of Oriental commerce; and the distant Khorasan became the favourite province of the caliph.
    0
    0
  • At the time of the Afghan invasion of Mir Mahmud (1722), Malik Mahommed Kaiani was the resident ruler in Seistan, and by league with the invader or other intrigue he secured for himself that particular principality and a great part of Khorasan also.
    0
    0
  • Hospitable and generous, he held in Khorasan a court of great magnificence.
    0
    0
  • (C. Mi.) Nishapur, a province of Persia, situated between Meshed and Sabzevar, in northern Khorasan.
    0
    0
  • It was once one of the four great cities of Khorasan, rivalling Rai (Rhages), "the mother of cities," in importance and population, but is now a small and comparatively unimportant place with a population of barely 15,000.
    0
    0
  • But the pay was small, and Avicenna wandered from place to place through the districts of Nishapur and Mer y to the borders of Khorasan, seeking an opening for his talents.
    0
    0
  • Nub II., in order to retain at least a nominal sway over those Afghan territories, confirmed him in his high position and even invested Sabuktagin's son Mahmud with the governorship of Khorasan, in reward for the powerful help they had given him in his desperate struggles with a confederation of disaffected nobles of Bokhara under the leadership of Fa'iq and the troops of the Dailamites, a dynasty that had arisen on the shores of the Caspian Sea and wrested already from the hands of the Samanids all their western provinces.
    0
    0
  • But this Mogul visitation was most calamitous; forty persons, indeed, are stated to have alone survived the general massacre of 1232, and as a similar catastrophe overtook the city at the hands of Timur in 1398, when the local dynasty of Kurt, which had succeeded the Ghorides in eastern Khorasan, was put an end to, it is astonishing to find that early in the 15th century Herat was again flourishing and populous, and the favoured seat of the art and literature of the East.
    0
    0
  • Bujnurd, a town of Persia, in the province of Khorasan, in a fertile plain encompassed by hills, in 37° 29' N., 57° 21' E., at an elevation of 3600 ft.
    0
    0
  • Retreating to Ghazni, he there yielded, and was imprisoned, and Mahmud obtained undisputed power as sovereign of Khorasan and Ghazni (997) The Ghaznevid dynasty is sometimes reckoned by native historians to commence with Sabuktagin's conquest of Bost and Kosdar (978).
    0
    0
  • From Meshed Aga Mahommed sent an envoy to Zaman Shah, asking for the cession of Balkh, and explaining his invasion of Khorasan; but the Afghan monarch was too perplexed with the troubles in his own country and his own insecure position to do more than send an unmeaning reply.
    0
    0