Jur sentence example

jur
  • The Lol maintains a fairly straight course east to about 28° E., when it turns north-east, and in about 282° E., 92° N., joins the Bahrel-Homr. The chief of the southern affluents, and that tributary of the Ghazal which contributes the largest volume of water, is the Jur, known in its upper course as the Sue, Swe or Souch.
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  • After flowing north for several hundred miles the Sue, now the Jur, is joined on the left bank, in about 7° 30' N., 28° E., by the Wau, a considerable river whose headwaters are west of those of the Jur.
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  • The town of Wau (7° 42' N., 28° 3' E.), on the Jur, is the capital of the Bahr-el-Ghazal province of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan.
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  • Between the Jur and the Nile, and following a course generally parallel with these rivers, several streams run north from the Congo-Nile watershed and join the Bahr-el-Ghazal.
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  • The Tonj, the most westerly of these rivers, joins the Jur a little above its confluence with the Ghazal.
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  • From the confluence of the Lol with the Jur, above which point none of the rivers is called Bahr-el-Ghazal, to the junction with the Nile at Lake No, is a distance of about 200 m.
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  • Just above the Lol confluence the Jur broadens out and forms a lake (Ambadi) 0 m.
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  • For a considerable portion of the period between 1853 and 1865 John Petherick, a Welshman, originally a mining engineer, explored the Ghazal region, particularly the main stream and the Jur.
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  • In 1901 and following years the sudd was removed by British officers from the Bahr-el-Ghazal, the Jur and other rivers.
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  • For centuries, they exercised the power of life and death; a stone stands where the gallows were formerly erected, and indicates that here they exercised jur y regalia.
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  • The Bahr-el-Ghazal (Gazelle river) is a deep stream formed by the junction of many rivers, of which the Jur (see below) is the most important.
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  • The Lol maintains a fairly straight course east to about 28° E., when it turns north-east, and in about 282° E., 92° N., joins the Bahrel-Homr. The chief of the southern affluents, and that tributary of the Ghazal which contributes the largest volume of water, is the Jur, known in its upper course as the Sue, Swe or Souch.
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  • After flowing north for several hundred miles the Sue, now the Jur, is joined on the left bank, in about 7° 30' N., 28° E., by the Wau, a considerable river whose headwaters are west of those of the Jur.
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  • The town of Wau (7° 42' N., 28° 3' E.), on the Jur, is the capital of the Bahr-el-Ghazal province of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan.
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