Jacobi sentence example

jacobi
  • This is about a semitone below the Diapason Normal, and a just minor third lower than the St Jacobi organ in the same city (1688), measured by Herr Schmahl, a' 489.2.
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  • 1783 St Jacobi, Hamburg, "Tertia minore" stop..1688-1693Hofcapelle, Dresden.
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  • Jacobi and that of three squares by F.
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  • von Jacobi showed that for a given electromotive force in the battery the horse-power is greatest when the current is reduced to one-half of what it would be if the engine were at rest.
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  • Jacobi in 1857.
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  • He became involved in a controversy with Joseph Justus Scaliger, formerly his intimate friend, and others, wrote Ecclesiasticus auctoritati Jacobi regis oppositus (1611), an attack upon James I.
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  • Functional determinants were first investigated by Jacobi in a work De Determinantibus Functionalibus.
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  • Jacobi, J.
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  • He appears to have attended Dirichlet's lectures on theory of numbers, theory of definite integrals, and partial differential equations, and Jacobi's on analytical mechanics and higher algebra.
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  • Jacobi, and others.'
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  • In later life he was powerfully influenced by Fichte, and subsequently, on grounds of religious feeling, by Jacobi and Bardili.
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  • and putting a=b, Maclaurin's solution is obtained of If 1 - =o or 8 3 =1" in addition, we obtain the solution of Jacobi's the rotating spheroid.
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  • in the Protevangelium Jacobi, ch.
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  • The boldness of some of his ideas cost him some valuable friendships, as that of Jacobi, Lavater and even of his early teacher Hamann.
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  • These are: - Jacobi Bernoulli Basiliensis Opera (Genevae, 1 744), 2 tom.
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  • Bruno's writings had been much neglected when Jacobi brought them into notice in his Briefe fiber die Lehre Spinozas (2nd ed., 1879).
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  • KARL GUSTAV JACOB JACOBI (1804-1851), German mathematician, was born at Potsdam, of Jewish parentage, on the 10th of December 1804.
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  • It was in analytical development that Jacobi's peculiar power mainly lay, and he made many important contributions of this kind to other departments of mathematics, as a glance at the long list of papers that were published by him in Crelle's Journal and elsewhere from 1826 onwards will sufficiently indicate.
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  • Jacobi, were published in 1828-1832, and form a third volume.
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  • Legendre had pursued the subject which would now be called elliptic integrals alone from 1786 to 1827, the results of his labours having been almost entirely neglected by his contemporaries, but his work had scarcely appeared in 1827 when the discoveries which were independently made by the two young and as yet unknown mathematicians Abel and Jacobi placed the subject on a new basis, and revolutionized it completely.
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  • Jacobi (1801-1874) in Russia, working independently, succeeded in contriving methods which could be made commercially profitable.
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  • The "Aphorisms on Naturphilosophie" contained in the Jahrbiicher der Medicin als Wissenschaft (1806-1808) are for the most part extracts from the Wiirzburg lectures; and the Denkmal der Schrift von den gottlichen Dingen des Herrn Jacobi wasdrawn forth by the special incident of Jacobi's work.
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  • Jacobi (Leipzig, 1878).
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  • During these Wanderjahre he made the acquaintance of the poets Gellert and Jacobi, the learned Jean-Jacques Barthelemy, the duc de Choiseul, and Gottfried Achenwall, the statistician.
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  • Fries's point of view in philosophy may be described as a modified Kantianism, an attempt to reconcile the criticism of Kant and Jacobi's philosophy of belief.
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  • In this view of reason Fries approximates to Jacobi rather than to Kant.
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  • Jacobi, the other a political pamphlet which called forth violent criticism.
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  • In the beginning of the Encyklopadie he discusses the defects of dogmatism, empiricism, the philosophies of Kant and Jacobi.
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  • He spent some time with Jacobi at Pempelfort and with Buchholz at Walbergen.
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  • von Jacobi (1801-1874).
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  • Jacobi, Printing, a practical treatise on the art of printing, &c. (8vo, 4th ed., London, 1908); W.
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  • Jacobi, The Printer's Handbook of Trade Recipes, &c. (8vo, 3rd ed., London, 1905); F.
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  • Jacobi), but the assertion that we owe the present division of the chapters of the Vulgate to him is false.
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  • The change of opinion in this respect may be dated from Lessing's famous conversation with Jacobi in 1780.
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  • Jacobi illustrious.
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  • Jacobi, he extended these results to curves and surfaces of unequal order.
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  • From this point of view we may even see a truth in Jacobi's dictum as quoted by Sir W.
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  • Jacobi, Das Romerkastell Saalburg (2 vols., Homburg, 1897); also a small guide by the same author (3rd ed.
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  • Jacobi and other mathematicians have developed to a great extent, and as a question of pure mathematics only, Hamilton's processes, and have thus made extensive additions to our knowledge of differential equations.
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  • FRIEDRICH HEINRICH JACOBI (1743-1819), German philosopher, was born at Dusseldorf on the 25th of January 1743.
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  • Of a retiring, meditative disposition, Jacobi associated himself at Geneva mainly with the literary and scientific circle of which the most prominent member was Lesage.
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  • Jacobi kept up his interest in literary and philosophic matters by an extensive correspondence, and his mansion at Pempelfort, near Dusseldorf, was the centre of a distinguished literary circle.
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  • This was followed in 1779 by Woldemar, a philosophic novel, of very imperfect structure, but full of genial ideas, and giving the most complete picture of Jacobi's method of philosophizing.
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  • A few unimportant tracts on questions of theoretical politics were followed in 1785 by the work which first brought Jacobi into prominence as a philosopher.
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  • The Briefe fiber die Lehre Spinozas (1785; 2nd ed., much enlarged and with important Appendices, 1789) expressed sharply and clearly Jacobi's strenuous objection to a dogmatic system in philosophy, and drew upon him the vigorous enmity of the Berlin clique, led by Moses Mendelssohn.
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  • Jacobi's next important work, David Hume fiber den Glauben, oder Idealismus and Realismus (1787), was an attempt to show not only that the term Glaube had been used by the most eminent writers to denote what he had employed it for in the Letters on Spinoza, but that the nature of the cognition of facts as opposed to the construction of inferences could not be otherwise expressed.
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  • In this writing, and especially in the Appendix, Jacobi came into contact with the critical philosophy, and subjected the Kantian view of knowledge to searching examination.
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  • The outbreak of the war with the French republic induced Jacobi in 1793 to leave his home near Dusseldorf, and for nearly ten years he resided in Holstein.
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  • During the same period the excitement caused by the accusation of atheism brought against Fichte at Jena led to the publication of Jacobi's Letter to Fichte (1799), in which he made more precise the relation of his own philosophic principles to theology.
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  • Soon after his return to Germany, Jacobi received a call to Munich in connexion with the new academy of sciences just founded there.
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  • A bitter reply from Schelling was left without answer by Jacobi, but gave rise to an animated controversy in which Fries and Baader took prominent part.
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  • In 1812 Jacobi retired from the office of president, and began to prepare a collected edition of his works.
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  • To the second is prefixed an introduction by Jacobi, which is at the same time an introduction to his philosophy.
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  • The philosophy of Jacobi is essentially unsystematic. A certain fundamental view which underlies all his thinking is brought to bear in succession upon those systematic doctrines which appear to stand most sharply in contradiction to it, and any positive philosophic results are given only occasionally.
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  • For Jacobi understanding, or the logical faculty, is purely formal or elaborative, and its results never transcend the given material supplied to it.
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  • As Jacobi starts with the doctrine that thought is partial and limited, applicable only to connect facts, but incapable of explaining their existence, it is evident that for him any demonstrative system of metaphysic which should attempt to subject all existence to the principle of logical ground must be repulsive.
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  • Now in modern philosophy the first and greatest demonstrative system of metaphysic is that of Spinoza, and it lay in the nature of things that upon Spinoza's system Jacobi should first direct his criticism.
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  • 216223): (I) Spinozism is atheism; (2) the Kabbalistic philosophy, in so far as it is philosophy, is nothing but undeveloped or confused Spinozism; (3) the philosophy of Leibnitz and Wolff is not less fatalistic than that of Spinoza, and carries a resolute thinker to the very principles of Spinoza; (4) every demonstrative method ends in fatalism; (5) we can demonstrate only similarities (agreements, truths conditionally necessary), proceeding always in identical propositions; every proof presupposes something already proved, the principle of which is immediately given (Offenbarung, revelation, is the term here employed by Jacobi, as by many later writers, e.g.
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  • Jacobi, accepting the law of reason and consequent as the fundamental rule of demonstrative reasoning, and as the rule explicitly followed by Spinoza, points out that, if we proceed by applying this principle so as to recede from particular and qualified facts to the more general and abstract conditions, we land ourselves, not in the notion of an active, intelligent creator of the system of things, but in the notion of an all-comprehensive, indeterminate Nature, devoid of will or intelligence.
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  • The best introduction to Jacobi's philosophy is the preface to the second volume of the Works, and Appendix 7 to the Letters on Spinoza's Theory.
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  • Kuhn, Jacobi and die Philosophie seiner Zeit (1834); F.
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  • Jacobi im Verhdltnis zu seinen Zeitgenossen (1848); H.
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  • Jacobi, (1876).
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  • Jacobi's Auserlesener Briefwechsel has been edited by F.
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  • Johann Georg Jacobi >>
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  • He then took up the study of German, worked at Kant and Jacobi, and sought to master the Philosophy of Nature of Schelling, by which he was at first greatly attracted.
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  • He sympathized with the principle of faith of Jacobi, but regarded it as arbitrary so long as it was not recognized as grounded in reason.
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  • The following year Cousin went to Munich, where he met Schelling for the first time, and spent a month with him and Jacobi, obtaining a deeper insight into the Philosophy of Nature.
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  • Tested by the power and effect of his teaching influence, Cousin occupies a foremost place in the rank of professors of philosophy, who like Jacobi, Schelling and Dugald Stewart have united the gifts of speculative, expository and imaginative power.
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  • Professor Jacobi has edited and translated the Kalpa Sutra, containing a life of the founder of the Jain order; but this can scarcely be older than the 5th century of our era.
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  • Professor Jacobi translated two more, the Uttaradhyayana and the Sutra Kritanga.
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  • It is related of the founder himself, the Maha-vira, that after twelve years' penance he thus obtained Nirvana (Jacobi, Jaina Sutras, i.
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  • Professor Jacobi, who is the best authority on the history of this sect, thus sums up the distinction between the Maha-vira and the Buddha: "Maha-vira was rather of the ordinary class of religious men in India.
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  • - Bhadrabahu's Kalpa Siitra, the recognized and popular manual of the Svetambara Jains, edited with English introduction by Professor Jacobi (Leipzig, 1879); Hemacandra's "Yoga S'astram," edited by Windisch, in the Zeitschrift der deutschen morg.
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  • Its leaders were obscure and usually illiterate men, who delighted to propound their theories for the universal reformation of society and the state in rhetoric of which tile characteristic phrases were borrowed from the tribune of the Jacobi.
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  • Later generations have learned by repeated experience that the eloquence of Hyde Park orators is not the voice of England; there were some even then-among those not immediately responsible for keeping orderwho urged the government to ti-ust the people;l but with the object-lesson of France before them it is not altogether surprising that ministers refused to believe ih the harmlessness of societies, which not only kept up a fraternal correspondence with the National Convention and the Jacobi.
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  • Among its celebrities are Johann Georg and Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, Heinrich Heine, Varnhagen von Ense, Peter von Cornelius, Wilhelm Camphausen and Heinrich von Sybel.
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  • Binet in France, Carl Gustav Jacobi in Germany, and James Joseph Sylvester and Arthur Cayley in England.
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  • Jacobi's researches were published in Crelle's Journal (1826-1841).
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  • In these papers the subject was recast and enriched by new and important theorems. through which the name of Jacobi is indissolubly associated with this branch of science.
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  • Skew-determinants were studied by Cayley; axisymmetric-determinants by Jacobi, V.
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  • Continuants have been discussed by Sylvester; alternants by Cauchy, Jacobi, N.
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  • Enneper, and the expression of continued fractions as determinants by Jacobi, V.
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  • At the same time he studied with great earnestness the writings of Kant and Jacobi.
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  • Meantime he studied Spinoza and Plato, and was profoundly influenced by both, though he was never a Spinozist; he made Kant more and more his master, though he departed on fundamental points from him, and finally remodelled his philosophy; with some of Jacobi's positions he was in sympathy, and from Fichte and Schelling he accepted ideas, which in their place in his system, however, received another value and import.
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  • From Leibnitz, Lessing, Fichte, Jacobi and the Romantic school he had imbibed a profound and mystical view of the inner depths of the human personality.
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  • Jacobi, with whom he was for years on terms of friendship. He now learned something of Schelling, and the works he published during this period were manifestly influenced by that philosopher.
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  • In 1583 he was_ appointed by the Edinburgh town council sole regent of the "town's college" ("Academia Jacobi Sexti," afterwards the university of Edinburgh), and three years later he received from the same source the title of "principal, or first master," and was engaged in lecturing on philosophy.
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  • Through his philosophical writings he became acquainted with many distinguished persons - Goethe, Herder, Princess Amalia of Gallitzin, and especially Jacobi, with whom he had much in common.
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  • Towards the end of the 18th century Eutin acquired some fame as the residence of a group of poets and writers, of whom the best-known were Johann Heinrich Voss, the brothers Stolberg, and Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi.
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  • After Steiner's publication (1832) of his Systematische Entwickelungen he received, through Jacobi's exertions, who was then professor at Konigsberg, an honorary degree of that university; and through the influence of G.
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  • Jacobi and of the brothers Alexander and Wilhelm von Humboldt a new chair of geometry was founded for him at Berlin (1834).
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  • Hamann, the friend of Herder and Jacobi, who was thus a mediator between Kant and these philosophical adversaries.
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  • At Cassel Forster formed an intimate friendship with the great anatomist Sommerring, and about the same time made the acquaintance of Jacobi, who gave him a leaning towards mysticism from which he subequently emancipated himself.
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  • Jacobi, Erinnerungen an August Neander (1882); Philipp Schaff, Erinnerungen an Neander (1886); Adolph Harnack, Rede auf August Neander (1889); A.
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  • See Lejeune-Dirichlet, "Geddchtnisrede auf Jacobi" 'in the ' Abhandlungen der Berliner Akademie (1852).
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  • Ere rationalismus vulgaris fell before the combined assault of Schleiermacher's subjective theology and the deeper historical insight of the Hegelians, it had found a refuge successively in the Kantian postulates of the practical reason, and in the vague but earnest faith-philosophy of Jacobi.
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  • Jacobi was ridiculed as endeavouring to reintroduce into philosophy the antiquated notion of unreasoning belief, was denounced as an enemy of reason, as a pietist, and as in all probability a Jesuit in disguise, and was especially attacked for his use of the ambiguous term "belief."
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