Independencia sentence example

independencia
  • The Independencia Park, formerly called Calvario Park, which occupies a hill on the west side of the city, is the largest and most attractive of the public gardens.
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  • The more noteworthy are the old government house (now occupied by the school of mines), the legislative chambers, municipal hall and jail - all fronting on the Praga da Independencia - and elsewhere the old Casa dos Contos (afterwards the public treasury), a theatre (the oldest in Brazil, restored in 1861-1862) and a hospital.
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  • Mello Moraes, Brazil historico (4 vols., Rio de Janeiro, 1839); Chorographia historica, chronographica genealogica, nobiliaria e politica do Brazil (5 vols., Rio de Janeiro, 1858-1863); A Independencia e o imperio do Brazil (Rio de Janeiro, 1877); B.
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  • Hernandez y Davalos, Coleccion de documentos Para la historia de la Independencia (Mexico, 6 vols).
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  • There are several public squares and gardens, the more important being the Praca Harmonia, the Pra9a d'Alfandega, Pra9a da Independencia and the Parque, where an exposition was held in 1901.
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  • above the level of the Plaza de la Independencia.
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  • The principal street, which is considered one of the finest boulevards in South America, is the Calle 18 de Julio, extending eastward from the Plaza de la Independencia to the suburb of Cordon; one of its features is its Sunday morning market, occupying the whole street from the Plaza de la Independencia to the Plaza Libertad, a distance of half a mile - a survival of the old market that existed here at the fortified entrance to the walled town in the earlier years of its history.
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  • There are seven plazas, or squares, within the urban limits: Zabala or Rincon, Constitucion or Matriz, Independencia, Libertad or Cagancha, Treinte y Tres, Flores and Frutos; and two suburban parks or public gardens: the Paseo del Prado and Parque Urbano.
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  • The Plaza de la Independencia stands at the junction of the old and new towns and is the centre of the city's political and social life.
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  • Amunatequi, Descubri miento y conquista de Chile (Santiago, 1885), a valuable detailed account of the Spanish conquest; by same author, Los Precursores de la independencia de Chile (Santiago, 1870), a clear useful description of the evils of the Spanish colonial system; Horacio Lara, Cronica de la Araucania (Santiago, 1889), a history of the Araucanian Indians right up to recent dates; Abbe Eyzaguirre, Histoire du Chili (Lille, 1855), mainly dealing with the position of the Church during the colonial period.
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  • Valdes, Revolution Chilena y campanas de la independencia (Santiago, 1888), an account of the early fighting and rivalry of the revolutionary leaders; W.
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  • The eastern extremity of the state is served by a railway originally called the Conde d'Eu railway but now forming part of the Great Western of Brazil system, which runs westward and northward from Parahyba to Independencia (72 m.), where it connects with the extension of the Natal and Nova Cruz line, and a branch runs southward to Pilar, 15 m.
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  • Carranza, Constitucion Nacional y Constituciones Provinciales Vigentes (Buenos Aires, 1898); Angelo de Gubernatis, L' Argentina (Firenze, 1898); Meliton Gonzales, El Gran Chaco Argentino (Buenos Aires, 1890); John Grant & Sons, The Argentine Year Book (Buenos Aires, 1902 et seq.); Francis Latzina, Diccionario Geografico Argentino (Buenos Aires, 1891); Geographie de la Republique Argentine (Buenos Aires, 1890); L' Agriculture et l'Elevage dans la Republique Argentine (Paris, 1889); Bartolome Mitre, Historia de San Martin y de la Emancipation Sud-Americana, segun nuevos documentos (3 vols., Buenos Aires, 1887); Historia de Belgrano y de la Independencia Argentina (3 vols., Buenos Aires, 1883); Felipe Soldan, Diccionario Geografico Estadistico Nacional Argentino (Buenos Aires, 1885); Thomas A.
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