Iiepi sentence example

iiepi
  • Some genuine Sibylline verses are preserved in the Book of Marvels (IIepi oav,sautwv) of Phlegon of Tralles (2nd century A.D.).
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  • Some of Theodoret's dogmatic works are no longer extant: of his five books IIEpi Evavepwirila - ecws, for example, directed against Cyril after the council of Ephesus, we now possess fragments merely.
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  • Among the apologetico-dogmatic works of Theodoret must be reckoned his ten discourses IIEpi irpovotas.
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  • With Plutarch, who dedicated to him his treatise IIEpi Tov irpwrov 11vxpov, with Herodes Atticus, to whom he bequeathed his library at Rome, with Demetrius the Cynic, Cornelius Fronto, Aulus Gellius, and with Hadrian himself, he lived on intimate terms; his great rival, whom he violently attacked in his later years, was Polemon of Smyrna.
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  • In fact a medley from both Basil and the Physiologus exists under the title of the Hexaeineron of Eustathius; some copies of the first bear as a title IIepi diuvnoXoyc'as, and in a Milan MS. the "morals" of the Physiologus are ascribed to Basil.
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  • A fragment of this was published under the title IIepi 7rapab6 cov µrXambuirrwv by L.
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  • His radical scepticism is seen in the first sentence of his IIEpi 01)o€ws, quoted by Cicero in the Academics ii.
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  • The same difficulty is found in the case of the IIEpi to-Topias referred to by the scholiast on Apollonius.
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  • Fresh translations of Aristotle and Averroes had already been made from the Arabic (IIepi ret ivropiat from the Hebrew) by Michael Scot, and Hermannus Alamannus, at the instance of the emperor Frederick II.; so that the whole body of Aristotle's works was at hand in Latin translations from about 1210 to 1225.
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  • Among the works which he translated into Syriac and of which his versions survive are treatises of Aristotle, Porphyry and Galen, 3 the Ars grammatica of Dionysius Thrax, the works of Dionysius the Areopagite, and possibly two or three treatises of Plutarch.4 His own original works are less important, but include a " treatise on logic, addressed to Theodore (of Merv), which is unfortunately imperfect, a tract on negation and affirmation; a treatise, likewise addressed to Theodore, On the Causes of the Universe, according to the Views of Aristotle, showing how it is a Circle; a tract On Genus, Species and Individuality; and a third tract addressed to Theodore, On the Action and Influence of the Moon, explanatory and illustrative of Galen's IIEpi rcptaiµwv r t µepwv, bk.
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  • The latter singles out the version of the pseudo-Aristotelian IIEpi Kbvµov as a model of excellence in translation.
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  • Speliotopoulos, IIEpi 'EpEid60v (Athens, 1890); T.
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  • His treatise IIEpi a pwv, uBaTwv, Kai T07rwv (Airs, Waters, and Places) contains the first enunciation of the principles of public health.
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  • Although the treatises IIEpi Kpwviuwv cannot be accepted as authentic, we find in the Ilpoyvwvr,KOV evidence of the acuteness of observation in the manner in which the occurrence of critical days in disease is enunciated.
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  • Although the treatise IIEpi voivwv is doubtfully from the pen of Hippocrates, it contains strong evidence of having been the work of his grandson, representing the views of the Father of Medicine.
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  • Littre accepts the following thirteen as absolutely genuine: (I) On Ancient Medicine (IIEpi ap X airs i f rpLK'Y / s); (2) The Prognostics (IIpoyvcovruK6v); (3) The Aphorisms ('AOopc-pot); (4) The Epidemics, i.
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  • ('E7rch,utcov a Kai -y'); (5) On Regimen in Acute Diseases (IIEpi cairns o Ewv); (6) On Airs, Waters, and Places (IIEpi cthpwv, l'6aTwv, Kai rorrwv); (7) On the Articulations (IIEpi etpBpwv); (8) On Fractures (IIEpi by c&v); (9) The Instruments of Reduction (M0xXix6s); (Jo) The Physician's Establishment, or Surgery (Kar' i rpEiov); (II) On Injuries of the Head (IIEpi KE0aXij TpwpaTwv); (12) The Oath ("OpKoi); (13) The Law (Nopos).
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  • Of these Adams accepts as certainly genuine the 2nd, 6th, 5th, 3rd (7 books), 4th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 12th, and as " pretty confidently acknowledged as genuine, although the evidence in their favour is not so strong," the 1st, Loth and 13th, and, in addition, (14) On Ulcers (IIEpi EXKc v); (15) On Fistulae (IIEpi vu piyywv); (16) On Hemorrhoids (IIEpi aipoppot&e); (17) On the Sacred Disease (IIEpi iepi l s yob o- According to the sceptical and somewhat subjective criticism of Ermerins, the whole collection is to be regarded as spurious except Epidemics, books i.
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  • Hermogenes also spoke highly of him (IIEpi ibeWV).
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  • Archimedes gave his results in the treatise IIepi Ti j c aOaipas Kai roD KUXLvbpov: he left unfinished the problem of dividing a sphere into segments whose volumes are in a given ratio.
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  • He wrote many historical and geographical works, of which some seem to have been voluminous and of considerable value on account of the sources to which their author had access: (I)`Pwµai,u (2) 'AvvuptaKet: (3) (4) De Arabia sive De expeditione arabica; (5) Physiologa; (6) De Euphorbia herba; (7) IIEpi Ora: (8) IIEpl (IIEpi i'wypci wv): (10) ` Oµo&ornTEs: (II) IIEpi 400pas: (12) 'E?riypaµµa.
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  • IIepi Lpow, i (ed.
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  • 6 IIepi Mot) IIu9ayopte00 Xhyos, i.
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  • This work of the Pythagorean, to which the mystical name BaKXac is sometimes given, seems to have consisted of three books: (I) IIEpi Kkuou, containing a general account of the origin and arrangement of the universe; (2) llepi ckaaes, an exposition of the nature of numbers; (3) IIEpc kxi)s, on the nature of the soul.
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  • See Mustoxidi, Delle cose Corciresi (Corfu, 1848); Lunzi, IIEpi Tjs - 'ETrramp-a 'Ever&v (Athens, 1856); Ansted, The I.
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  • The result of his travels was set down by him in two works - Aiyu7rrcaea and IIEpi `T7rEpOopEwv, which were used by Diodorus Siculus.
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  • He was the author of a lost work On Nature or the Non-existent (IIepi 6vros i) zrepi chuaews, fragments edited by M.
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  • In many satires the philosophers were pounded, as in the " Burial of Menippus " and " Concerning the Sects " (IIEpi aipeahwv).
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  • Modern critics are of opinion that, if genuine, it is an abridgment of a larger work by him (IIepi B &w).
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  • Galen, who in his youth was carefully trained in the Stoic philosophy, was an unusually prolific writer on logic. Of the numerous commentaries and original treatises, a catalogue of which is given in his work De propriis libris, one only has come down to us, the treatise on Fallacies in dictione (IIepi TWV KaTa T1jv M Gi' oocio-µarouv).
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  • His extant works consist of two treatises; the one, Hcpi ravovj.thv s v4aipas, contains some simple propositions on the motion of the sphere, the other, IIEpi EirtroXWV Kai Sbo €wv, in two books, discusses the rising and setting of the fixed stars.
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  • Herodianus also wrote numerous grammatical treatises, of which only one has come down to us in a complete form (IIepi µovr t pous Wews, on peculiar style), articles on exceptional or anomalous words.
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  • They are better than usual for the IfEpi aTeOlcvou, KaTa Tcµo?cpaTous; best for the IIEpi 7rapa7rpEa- (3EEas.
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  • 29); of these the names of the following have survived: - (1) l spl 'wwv (mentioned in Or., 15); (2) IIepi Sac iovwv (mentioned in Or., 16); (3) Aoyos lrpos ran "EXXfvas; (4) Hpo 1 3X j .0 rwv f3c/3Xiov (Eus., v.
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  • 5) IIpos Coro- 4n 7 vap4Vovs arpos Beou (mentioned in Or., '40 as a book which Tatian intended to write, but there is no evidence that he carried his plan into effect; (6) IIepi Tou Kara 2corijpa Karaprur oii (Clem.
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  • Dionysius was also the author of several rhetorical treatises, in which he shows that he has thoroughly studied the best Attic models: The Art of Rhetoric (which is rather a collection of essays on the theory of rhetoric), incomplete, and certainly not all his work; The Arrangement of Words (IIEpi 6uv%o-Ews ovo,uarwv), treating of the combination of words according to the different styles of oratory; On Imitation (Ilepi Au170 Ews), on the best models in the different kinds of literature and the way in which they are to be imitated - a fragmentary work; Commentaries on the Attic Orators (IIEpi T(AV apXalwv prtrOpwv inro j j anopoi), which, however, only deal with Lysias, Isaeus, Isocrates and (by way of supplement) Dinarchus; On the admirable Style of Demosthenes (IIEpi Anyoa8 'ous b€t)orrlros); and On the Character of Thucydides (Hepi Tou Oovevbibov a detailed but on the whole an unfair estimate.
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  • He is the author of a AE (or IIEpi TWV TWV SEKa n r6pwv, which has come down to us in an incomplete form.
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