Ibelin sentence example

ibelin
  • (I) The assizes of the high court are preserved for us in works by legists - John of Ibelin, Philip of Novara and Geoffrey of Tort - composed in the 13th century.
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  • John of Ibelin - the laws of the kingdom were laid down by Godfrey, who is thus regarded as the great vo.
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  • The text of Ibelin became a textus receptus - but it also became overlaid by glosses, for it was used as authoritative in the kingdom of Cyprus after the loss of the kingdom of Jerusalem, and it needed expounding.
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  • Recensions and revisions were twice made, in 1368 and 1531; but how far the true Ibelin was recovered, and what additions or alterations were made at these two dates, we cannot tell.
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  • We can only say that we have the text of Ibelin which was used in Cyprus in the later middle ages.
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  • These assizes do not, of course, appear in Ibelin, who was only concerned with the feudal law of the high court.
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  • In 1229 this commission was overthrown by John of Ibelin, lord of Beirut, against whom it had taken proceedings.
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  • Till 1243 the party of Frederick had been successful in retaining Tyre, and the baronial demand for a regency had remained without effect; but in that year the opposition, headed by the great family of Ibelin, succeeded, under cover of asserting the rights of Alice of Cyprus to the regency, in securing possession of Tyre, and the kingdom of Jerusalem thus fell back into the power of the baronage.
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  • by Stubbs, "Rolls" series, London, 1864), and the Chronique d'outremer, or the French translation of William of Tyre's history and its continuation by Ernoul, the squire of Balian, seigneur of Ibelin, 1228.
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  • In 1144 a crusaders' fortress was built on the hill, which is often mentioned under the name Ibelin.
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  • cii.), William of Tyre tells us that he spent his spare time in reading and had a particular affection for history; that he was well skilled in the jus consuetudinarium of the kingdom (afterwards recorded by lawyers like John of Ibelin and Philip of Novara as "the assizes of Jerusalem"); and that he had the royal faculty for remembering faces, and could generally be trusted to address by name anybody whom he had once met, so that he was more popular with high and low than any of his predecessors.
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