Haureau sentence example

haureau
  • Haureau, De la philosophie scolastique, pp. 294-318; R.
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  • Eric or Heiricus, who studied there under Haimon, the successor of Hrabanus, and after wards taught at Auxerre, wrote glosses on the margin of his copy of the pseudo-Augustinian Categoriae, which have been published by Cousin and Haureau.
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  • It is possible, as Haureau maintains, that Roscellinus meant no more than to refute the extreme Realism which asserts the substantial and, above all, the independent existence of the universals.
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  • It is not to be supposed that the full scope of his doctrine was present to the mind of Roscellinus; but Nominalism would hardly have made the sensation it did had its assertions been as innocent as Haureau would make them.
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  • Haureau, Histoire de la philosophie scolastique, i.
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  • Remigius is thus a Realist, not so much in the sense of Plato as in the spirit of Parmenides, and Haureau applies to this form of Realism Bayle's description of Realism in general as " le Spinosisme non developpe."
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  • But there is in some of the manuscripts the various reading of " indifferenter " for " individualiter," and this is accepted as giving the true sense of the passage by Cousin and Remusat (Haureau and Prantl taking, on different grounds, the opposite view).
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  • The concessions to Nominalism which such views embody make them representative of what Haureau calls " the Peripatetic section of the Realistic school."
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  • But Gilbert de la Porree, according to Haureau, is the most eminent logician of the Realistic school in the 12th century and the most profound metaphysician of either school.
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  • difference of opinion as to his system, some, like Ritter and Erdmann, regarding it as a moderate form of Realism - a return indeed to the position of Aristotle - while others, like Cousin, Remusat, Haureau and Ueberweg, consider it to be essentially Nominalistic, only more prudently and perhaps less consistently expressed than was the case with Roscellinus.
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  • " These writings contained," says Haureau, " the text of the Organon, the Physics, the Metaphysics, the Ethics, the De anima, the Parva naturalia and a large number of other treatises of Aristotle, accompanied by continuous commentaries.
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  • His treatise De anima, on which Haureau lays particular stress, is interesting as showing the greater scope now given to psychological discussions.
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  • Some of these, it may be said, are simply the old Scholastic problem in a different garb; but the extended horizon of which Haureau speaks is amply proved by mere reference to the treatises of Albert and St Thomas.
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  • Philosophy, as Haureau finely says, was the passion of the 13th century; but in the 15th humanism, art and the beginnings of science and of practical discovery were busy creating a new world, which was destined in due time to give birth to a new philosophy.
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  • Besides the numerous works quoted in articles on the individual philosophers, see Haureau, Histoire de la philosophic scolastique (2 vols., 1850; revised and expanded in 1870 as Histoire de la phil.
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  • Supplementary details are given in Haureau's Singularites historiques et litteraires (1861) and in R.
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  • Haureau, Notices.
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  • Haureau, De la philosophie scolastique (Paris, 1850); Opuscula in J.
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  • Haureau, Histoire de la philosophic scolastique (Paris, 1872); F.
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  • The histories of Haureau, Ritter, Prantl and Windelband may also be consulted.
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  • Lefevre (Milan, 1894), on which see Haureau in the Journal des savants for 1895.
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  • 1044-1045; Haureau, Phil.
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  • Erigena in all probability never left France, and Haureau has advanced some reasons for fixing the date of his death about 877.
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  • See also the general works on scholastic philosophy, especially Haureau, Stuckl and Kaulich.
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  • See Jourdain, Recherches sur les traductions d'Aristote (2nd ed., 1843); Haureau, Philosophie scolastique (2nd ed., 1872), and works appended to art.
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  • Haureau, Hist.
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  • Haureau, A.
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  • 167-173); Haureau, Hist.
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  • Haureau, op. cit.
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  • Cousin, C uvres inedites of Abelard (Paris, 1836); Haureau, Philosophie scolastique, i.
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  • See Haureau, Memoire sur la vie et quelques oeuvres d'Alain de Lille (Paris, 1885); M.
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  • Haureau, Philosophie scolastique (Paris, 1850), tome i.
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  • and his advisers; "Relation de la mort de Charles V" in Haureau, Notices et extraits, xxxi.
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  • Haureau, De la philosophic scolastique, vol.
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  • Harnack's History of Dogma; Haureau's Histoire de la philosophie scolastique, 225-238; Hermann Reuter, Geschichte der religiosen Aufkldrung des Mittelalters, vol.
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  • Ii we are to put a sense upon this new expression, William may probably have meant to recall any words of his which seemed, by locating the universal in the entirety of its essence in each individual to confer upon the individual an independence which did not belong to it - thus leading in the end to the demand for a separate universal for 1 This treatise, first published by Cousin in his Ouvrages inedits d'Abelard, was attributed by him to Abelard, and he was followed in this opinion by Haureau; but Prantl adduces reasons which seem satisfactory for believing it to be the work of an unknown writer of somewhat later date (see Prantl.
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  • Other questions, says Haureau, are " placed on the order of the day - the question of the elements of substance, that of the principle of individuation, that of the origin of the ideas, of the manner of their existence in the human understanding and in the divine thought, as well as various others of equal interest " (i.
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  • Poole's Illustrations of the History of Mediaeval Thought (1884), while much light is thrown upon the minuter history of the period by the Chartularium Universitatis Parisiensis edited by Denifle and Chatelain in 1894, by Haureau's Notices et extraits de quelques MS. latins de la Bibliotheque Nationale (6 vols., 1890-1895) and by the Beitrage zur Geschichte d.
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