Hartig sentence example

hartig
  • Wounds, &c.Marshall Ward, Timber and some of its Diseases, p. 210; Hartig, Diseases of Trees (London, 1894).
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  • 356; Hartig, Text-Book of the Diseases of Trees (Eng.
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  • The fungus is most conspicuous on the grapes, but the leaves and stems From Hartig's Lehrbuch der Pfanzenkrankheiten, by permission of Julius Springer.
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  • Hartig's character drawn from the trochanter - whether of two segments or undivided - the groups being termed respectively Ditrocha and Monotrocha.
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  • Hartig advanced knowledge on the structure and development of tissues, while A.
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  • Hartig, Die Familien der Blattwespen and Holzwespen (Berlin, 1860); Walsh, " On the Insects, Coleopterous, Hymenopterous and Dipterous, inhabiting the Galls of certain species of Willow," Proc. Ent.
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  • Hartig, Genesis der Revolution in Osterreich (Leipzig, 1850), - an enlarged English translation will be found in the 4th volume of W.
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  • When these fires occur while the trees are full of sap, a curious mucilaginous matter is exuded from the half-burnt stems; when dry it is of pale reddish colour, like some of the coarser kinds of gum-arabic, and is soluble in water, the solution resembling gumwater, in place of which it is sometimes used; considerable quantities are collected and sold as " Orenburg gum "; in Siberia and Russia it is occasionally employed as a semi-medicinal food, being esteemed an antiscorbutic. For burning in close stoves and furnaces, larch makes tolerably good fuel, its value being estimated by Hartig as only one-fifth less than that of beech; the charcoal is compact, and is in demand for iron-smelting and other metallurgic uses in some parts of Europe.
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  • In Merulius lacrymans Hartig has observed thin-walled hyphae with large lumina, the septa of which are perforated like those of sieve-tubes.
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  • von Hartig, Genesis der Revolution in Osterreich im Jahre 1848 (Leipzig, 1851; 3rd edition, enlarged, ib., 1851; translated as appendix to Coxe's House of Austria, ed.
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  • Hartig, Timbers and How to know them; J.
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  • Causes of Disease, &c. Pfeffer, Physiology of Plants (Oxford, 1900); Sorauer, Treatise on the Physiology of Plants (1895); Bailey, The Principles of Agriculture (1898); Lafar, Technical Mycology (1898); Hartig, Diseases of Trees (I 894); Marshall Ward, Proc. Roy.
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