Hamann sentence example

hamann
  • The murder of Kotzebue by Karl Sand, however, shocked him out of his extreme revolutionary views, and from this time he tended, under the influence of the writings of Hamann and Herder, more and more in the direction of conservatism and romanticism, until at last he ended, in a mood almost of pessimism, by attaching himself to the extreme right wing of the forces of reaction.
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  • Hamann (1730-1788), the term mysticism may be fitly applied.
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  • Hamann has divided the group into three families, to which a fourth must be added.
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  • Highly magnified (both from Hamann).
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  • The boldness of some of his ideas cost him some valuable friendships, as that of Jacobi, Lavater and even of his early teacher Hamann.
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  • His story has been dramatized by Max Ring, Die Genfer (1850), by Jose Echegaray, La Muerte en los Labios (1880), by Albert Hamann, Servet (1881), and by Prof. Shields, The Reformer of Geneva (1897).
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  • Hamann seems at this time to have thought that any strenuous devotion to "bread-and-butter" studies was lowering, and accordingly gave himself entirely to reading, criticism and philological inquiries.
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  • In both cases apparently the rupture might be traced to the curious and unsatisfactory character of Hamann himself.
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  • Hamann, however, was quite unfitted for business, and when left in London, gave himself up entirely to his fancies, and was quickly reduced to a state of extreme poverty and want.
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  • In 1759 Hamann returned to Konigsberg, and lived for several years with his father, filling occasional posts in Konigsberg and Mitau.
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  • During this period of comparative rest Hamann was able to indulge in the long correspondence with learned friends which seems to have been his greatest pleasure.
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  • Hamann's works resemble his life and character.
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  • A place in the history of philosophy can be yielded to Hamann only because he expresses in uncouth, barbarous fashion an idea to which other writers have given more effective shape.
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  • Quite naturally, then, Hamann is led to object strongly to much of the Kantian philosophy.
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  • Concreteness, therefore, is the one demand which Hamann expresses, and as representing his own thought he used to refer to Giordano Bruno's conception (previously held by Nicolaus Curanus) of the identity of contraries.
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  • Nothing that Hamann has given can be regarded as in the slightest degree a response to it.
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  • Belief is, according to Hamann, the groundwork of knowledge, and he accepts in all sincerity Hume's analysis of experience as being most helpful in constructing a theological view.
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  • None of Hamann's writings is of great bulk; most are mere pamphlets of some thirty or forty pages.
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  • Hamann, the friend of Herder and Jacobi, who was thus a mediator between Kant and these philosophical adversaries.
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  • The education he received was comprehensive but unsystematic, and the want of definiteness in this early training doubtless tended to aggravate the peculiar instability of character which troubled Hamann's after life.
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