Hallgrimsson sentence example

hallgrimsson
  • C.) HALLGRIMSSON, JONAS (1807-1844), the chief lyrical poet of Iceland, was born in 1807 at Steinsstaoir in Eyjafjaroarsysla in the north of that island, and educated at the famous school of Bessastaor.
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  • The great Danish philologist and friend of Iceland, Rasmus Rask, and the poet Bjarni Thorarensen had done much to purify the language, but Jonas Hallgrimsson completed their work by his poems and tales, in a purer language than ever had been written in Iceland since the days of Snorri Sturlason.
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  • The excesses of Icelandic poetry were specially seen in the so-called rimur, ballads of heroes, &c., which were fiercely attacked by Jonas Hallgrimsson, who at last succeeded in converting the educated to his view.
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  • Most of the principal poems, tales and essays of JOnas Hallgrimsson appeared in the periodical Fj olnir, which he began publishing at Copenhagen in 183 5, together with Konr65 Gislason, a well-known philologist, and the patriotic Thomas Saemundsson.
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  • JOnas Hallgrimsson, who died in 1844, is the father of a separate school in Icelandic lyric poetry.
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  • The great influence of Jonas Hallgrimsson (1807-1845) is still felt, and his school was the reigning one up to the end of the 19th century, although then a change seemed to be in sight.
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  • 1835), who, following another of Jonas Hallgrimsson's many ways, has successfully revived the old metres of the classical Icelandic poets, whom he resembles in his majestic, but sometimes too gorgeous, language.
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  • Influenced by Jonas Hallgrimsson with regard to language and poetic diction, but keeping unbroken the traditions of Icelandic medieval poetry maintained by Sigur5r Breic fjorc6 (1798-1846), is another school of poets, very unlike the first.
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  • This school is very dissimilar from the half-romantic school of Jonas Hallgrimsson; it is nearer the national Icelandic school represented by Pall Olafsson and porsteinn Erlingsson, but differs from those writers by introducing foreign elements hitherto unknown in Icelandic literature, and - especially in the case of the prose-writers - by imitating closely the style and manner of some of the great Norwegian novelists.
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