Haller sentence example

haller
  • Excavations were made on its site in 1811 by Baron Haller von Hallerstein and the English architect C. R.
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  • Supported by the great authority of Haller, the doctrine of evolution, or development, prevailed throughout the whole of the 18th century, and Cuvier appears to have substantially adopted Bonnet's later views, though probably he would not have gone all lengths in the direction of " emboitement."
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  • Nevertheless, though the conceptions originally denoted by " evolution " and " development " were shown to be untenable, the words retained their application to the process by which the embryos of living beings gradually make their appearance; and the terms" development," " Entwickelung,"and " evolutio " are now indiscriminately used for the series of genetic changes exhibited by living beings, by writers who would emphatically deny that " development " or " Entwickelung " or " evolutio," in the sense in which these words were usually employed by Bonnet or Haller, ever occurs.
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  • Considering that this book was written before the time of Haller, or Bonnet, or Linnaeus, or Hutton, it surely deserves more respectful consideration than it usually receives.
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  • Aristotle, Haller, Harvey, Kielmeyer, Autenrieth, and many others have either made this observation incidentally, or, especially the latter, have drawn particular attention to it, and drawn therefrom results of permanent importance for physiology."
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  • von Haller, Papsttum u.
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  • Haller and C. A.
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  • Bonnet, Euler, Haller, Schmid and others " suppose miracles to be already implanted in nature.
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  • Haller, Arb.
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  • Haller, Concilium Basiliense, vol.
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  • The pursuit of the learned physician, - anatomy and physiology: exemplified by Harvey, Haller, Hunter, Johann Miller.
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  • These are physiology in the modern sense, as dating from Haller, and pathological anatomy, as dating from Morgagni.
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  • Albrecht von Haller (1708-1777) was a man of even more encyclopaedic attainments than Boerhaave.
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  • Haller occupied in the new university of Gottingen (founded 1737) a position corresponding to that of Boerhaave at Leiden, and in like manner influenced a very large circle of pupils, The appreciation of his work in physiology belongs to the history of that science; we are only concerned here with its influence on medicine.
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  • Haller's definition of irritability as a property of muscular tissue, and its distinction from sensibility as a property of nerves, struck at the root of the prevailing hypothesis respecting animal activity.
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  • Moreover, Haller's views did not rest on a priori speculation, but on numerous experiments.
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  • Unfortunately the lesson which his contemporaries learnt was not the importance of experiment, but only the need of contriving ether" systems "less open to objection; and thus the influence of Haller led directly to the theoretical subtleties of William Cullen and John Brown, and only indirectly and later on to the general anatomy of M.
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  • The great name of Haller does not therefore occupy a very prominent place in the history of practical medicine.
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  • Lancisi, Haller and others.
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  • He did not originate this line of research, for it had been pursued, if not originated, by Haller, and cultivated systematically by Tommasini, an Italian "contra-stimulist"; but he carried it out with much elaboration.
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  • This instrument, now indispensable in our daily work at the bedside, had indeed long been known both to physiologists (Haller) and to clinicians.
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  • Shortly after the foundation of the university of Gottingen appeared Zeitungen von gelehrten Sachsen (1739), still famous as the Gottingische gelehrte Anzeigen, which during its long and influential career has been conducted by professors of that university, and among others by Haller, Heyne and Eichhorn.
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  • BERTHOLD HALLER (1492-1536), Swiss reformer, was born at Aldingen in Wurttemberg, and after studying at Pforzheim, where he met Melanchthon, and at Cologne, taught in the gymnasium at Bern.
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  • Haller, Papsttum and Kirchenreform, vol.
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  • 9, p. 460 seq.; Harnack, Die Lehre der zwolf Apostel (1884), pp. 931 37; Haller, "Die Propheten der nachapostolischen Kirche," in the Theol.
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  • While thus engaged he determined to trace the history and describe the existing condition of each of the arts and sciences on which he was lecturing, being perhaps incited by the Bibliothecae of Albrecht von Haller.
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  • (1896, seq.); Haller, Papsttum and Kirchenreform (1903).
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  • von Haller, Die Alpen (1732, best ed., 1882, illustrated ed., 1902); and H.
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  • P, N, u, After Haller (Arbeiten zool.
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  • Haller, Bern in seinen Rathsmanualen, 1465-1565 (3 vols., Bern, 1900-1902); E.
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  • Albrecht von Haller >>
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  • Gadaldinus, Conrad Gesner, Sylvius, Cornarius, Joannes Montanus, Joannes Caius, Thomas Linacre, Theodore Goulston, Caspar Hoffman, Rene Chartier, Haller and Kuhn.
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  • Haller, Comptes rendus, 1905, 140, p. 127).
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  • Of the scientific societies the most noted is the Royal Society of Sciences (Konigliche Sozietdt der Wissenschaften) founded by Albrecht von Haller, which is divided into three classes, the physical, the mathematical and the historical-philological.
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  • Haller, Svenska Kyrkans mission i Lappmarken (1896).
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  • von Haller, Helvetien unter den Romern (Bern.
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  • Albert von Haller (b.
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  • So early as April 1819, at Göttingen, he had fallen under the influence of Karl Ludwig von Haller's Handbuch der allgemeinen Staatenkunde (1808), a text-book of the counterRevolution.
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  • von Haller, the first physiologist of the age, to adopt, advocate and extend them.
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  • The school of Cuvier was lamentably deficient in embryologists; and it was only in the course of the first thirty years of the igth century that Prevost and Dumas in France, and, later on, Ddllinger, Pander, von Bar, Rathke, and Remak in Germany, founded modern embryology; and, at the same time, proved the utter incompatibility of the hypothesis of evolution as formulated by Bonnet and Haller with easily demonstrable facts.
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