Hajjaj sentence example

hajjaj
  • In 691 Abdalmalik (`Abdul-Malik) determined to crush his rival and sent his general Hajjaj against Mecca.
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  • Jarir of another branch of the Bani Tamim lived in Irak and courted the favour of Hajjaj, its governor.
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  • Thence, a few days later, he sent Hajjaj b.
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  • Before the arrival of this reinforcement, Hajjaj confined himself to skirmishes, in which his soldiers always had the advantage.
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  • Hajjaj had set up a balista on the hill of Abu Qobais, whence he.poured on the city a hail of stones, which was suspended only in the days of the pilgrimage.
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  • Hajjaj having promised him amnesty if he would surrender, he went to his mother Asma, the daughter of Abu Bekr, who had reached the age of a hundred years, and asked her counsel.
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  • His head was cut off, and sent by Hajjaj to Damascus.
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  • Hajjaj pulled down the enlargements and restored the Ka`ba to its old state.
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  • Abdalmalik in alarm made Hajjaj governor of Irak with the most extensive powers.
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  • But he let them fall when Hajjaj lifted his veil and began to speak.
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  • As nobody uttered a word in reply, Hajjaj said: "Sto p, boy," and exclaimed: "The Prince of the Believers salutes you, and you do not answer his greeting !
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  • Thereupon Hajjaj ordered that every man capable of bearing arms should immediately join Mohallab in Khuzistan (Susiana), and swore that all who should be found in the town after the third day should be beheaded.
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  • This threat had its effect, and Hajjaj proceeded to Basra, where his presence was followed by the same results.
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  • In the meantime Hajjaj himself had, in 695 and 696, with great difficulty suppressed Shabib b.
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  • When, in 697, Hajjaj gave the government of Khorasan to Mohallab, he committed that of Sijistan (Seistan) to Obaidallah b.
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  • Not long after his arrival in Sijistan, Ibn Ash`ath, exasperated by the masterful tone of Hajjaj, the plebeian, towards himself, the high-born, decided to revolt.
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  • The new pretender entered Fars and Ahwaz (Susiana), and it was in this last province near Tostar (Shuster) that Hajjaj came up with him, after receiving from Syria the reinforcements which he had demanded in all haste from the caliph.
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  • Hajjaj, afraid lest his communications with Syria should be cut off, pitched his camp at Dair Qorra, eighteen miles west from Kufa towards the desert, where Mahommed, the brother of the caliph, and Abdallah, his son, brought him fresh troops.
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  • In great alarm Abdalmalik endeavoured to stifle the revolt by offering to dismiss Hajjaj from his post.
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  • Victory declared for Hajjaj.
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  • Ibn Ash`ath fled to Basra, where he managed to collect fresh troops; but having been again beaten in a furious battle that took place at Maskin near the Dojail, he took refuge at Ahwaz, from which he was soon driven by the troops of Hajjaj under `Omara b.
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  • His head was sent to Hajjaj and then to Damascus.
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  • Moreover, Hajjaj, in order to maintian the regular revenue from taxation, had been obliged to introduce stringent regulations, and had compelled a great many villagers who had migrated to the cities to return to their villages.
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  • Immediately after the victories of Dair al-Jamajim and Maskin, in 702, Hajjaj, built a new residence on the Tigris, between Basra and Kufa, which he called Wasit ("Middle").
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  • Hajjaj coined silver dirhems at Kufa in 694.
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  • Hajjaj, however, was not the man to allow the formation of a fresh nucleus of sedition, and persuaded the caliph to dismiss Omar in the year 712, and appoint Othman b.
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  • These two prefects compelled the refugees to return to Irak, where many of them were severely treated and even put to death by Hajjaj.
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  • Hajjaj was a sincere Moslem; this, however, did not prevent him from attacking Ibn Zobair in the Holy City, nor again from punishing rebels, though they bore the name of holy men.
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  • Hajjaj foreboded evil, and prayed eagerly that he might die before Walid.
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  • We can easily conceive the hatred felt by Suleiman for Hajjaj and for all that belonged to him.
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  • Hajjaj himself was dead; but Suleiman poured out his wrath on his family and his officers.
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  • Qasim, the conqueror of India, cousin of Hajjaj, was dismissed from his post and outlawed.
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  • Yazid discovered soon that the system of taxation as regulated by Hajjaj could not be altered without serious danger to the finances of the empire, and that he could not afford the expenses which his prodigal manner of life involved.
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  • This very able man, who under Hajjaj had been prefect of Mecca, belonged properly neither to the Qaisites nor to the Yemenites, but as he took the place of Ibn Hobaira and dismissed his partisans from their posts, the former considered him as their adversary, the, latter as their benefactor.
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  • Hajjaj, a man of high qualities, re-entered Gaul and pushed forward his raids as far as Lyons, but the Franks again drove back the Arabs as far as Narbonne.
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  • After his death his most glaring innovations (the introduction of two doors on a level with the ground, and the extension of the building lengthwise to include the Hijr) were corrected by Hajjaj, under orders from the caliph, but the building retained its more solid structure.
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  • The proud Arabic lords could not acquiesce in paying to a plebeian like Hajjaj, invested with absolute power by the caliph, the strict obedience he required.
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