Griffenfeldt sentence example

griffenfeldt
  • In May 1670 he received the titles of excellency and privy councillor; in July of the same year he was ennobled under the name of Griffenfeldt, deriving his title from the gold griffin with outspread wings which surmounted his escutcheon; in November 1673 he was created a count, a knight of the Elephant and, finally, imperial chancellor.
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  • Griffenfeldt was the originator of these new institutions.
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  • Griffenfeldt saw that, in future, the first at court would be the first everywhere.
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  • In the last three years of his administration, Griffenfeldt gave himself entirely to the conduct of the foreign policy of Denmark.
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  • Briefly, Griffenfeldt aimed at restoring Denmark to the rank of a great power.
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  • Such a conditional and tentative policy, on the part of a second-rate power, in a period of universal tension and turmoil, was most difficult; but Griffenfeldt did not regard it as impossible.
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  • An alliance, on fairly equal terms, between the three powers, would, in these circumstances, be the consummation of Griffenfeldt's "system"; an alliance with France to the exclusion of Sweden would be the next best policy; but an alliance between France and Sweden, without the admission of Denmark, was to be avoided at all hazards.
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  • Had Griffenfeldt's policy succeeded, Denmark might have recovered her ancient possessions to the south and east comparatively cheaply.
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  • On the iith of March 1676, wlfile on his way to the royal apartments, Griffenfeldt was arrested in the king's name and conducted to the citadel, a prisoner of state.
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  • On the 3rd of May Griffenfeldt was tried not by the usual tribunal, in such cases the Hojesteret, or supreme court, but by an extraordinary tribunal of 1 o dignitaries, none of whom was particularly well disposed towards the accused.
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  • Griffenfeldt, who was charged with simony, bribery, oath-breaking, malversation and lese-majeste, conducted his own defence under every imaginable difficulty.
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  • Griffenfeldt was pardoned on the scaffold, at the very moment when the axe was about to descend.
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  • Griffenfeldt married Kitty Nansen, the granddaughter of the great Burgomaster Hans Nansen, who brought him half a million rix-dollars.
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  • Under the guidance of his great chancellor Griffenfeldt, Denmark seemed for a brief period to have a chance of regaining her former position as a great power.
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  • But in sacrificing Griffenfeldt to the clamour of his adversaries, Christian did serious injury to the monarchy.
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  • The Kongelov is dated and subscribed the 14th of November 1665, but was kept a profound secret, only two initiated persons knowing of its existence until after the death of Frederick III., one of them being Kristoffer Gabel, the king's chief intermediary during the revolution, and the other the author and custodian of the Kongelov, Secretary Peder Schumacher, better known as Griffenfeldt.
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  • This was especially the case during the brief but brilliant administration of Chancellor Griffenfeldt.
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  • But Griffenfeldt's difficulties, always serious, were increased by the instability of the European situation, depending as it did on the ambition of Louis XIV.
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  • The Franco-Swedish Northern alliance left Griffenfeldt no choice but to accede to the War.
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  • Thus, very dexterously, Griffenfeldt had succeeded in gaining his subsidies without sacrificing his neutrality.
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  • His next move was to attempt to detach Sweden from France; but, Sweden showing not the slightest inclination for a rapprochement, Denmark was compelled to accede to the anti-French league, which she did by the treaty of Copenhagen, of January 1674, thereby engaging to place an army of 20,000 in the field when required; but here again Griffenfeldt safeguarded himself to some extent by stipulating that this provision was not to be operative till the allies were attacked by a fresh enemy.
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  • When, in December 1674, a Swedish army invaded Prussian Pomerania, Denmark was bound to intervene as a belligerent, but Griffenfeldt endeavoured to postpone this intervention as long as possible; and Sweden's anxiety to avoid hostilities with her southern neighbour materially assisted him to postpone the evil day.
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  • The aristocracy of birth, despite its reverses, still remained the elite of society; and Griffenfeldt, the son of a burgess as well as the protagonist of monarchy, was its most determined enemy.
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  • But what Griffenfeldt could create, Griffenfeldt could dispense with, and it was not long before he began to encroach upon the jurisdiction of the new departments of state by private conferences with their chiefs.
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  • See Peter Edvard Holm, Danmarks indre Historie under Enevaelden (Copenhagen, 1881-1886); Adolf Ditleva Jorgensen, Peter Griffenfeldt (Copenhagen, 1893); Robert Nisbet Bain, Scandinavia cap. x., xi.
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