Goschen sentence example

goschen
  • He acted as private secretary to Mr (afterwards Lord) Goschen, and in 1887, when Goschen became chancellor of the exchequer, was appointed his principal private secretary.
    0
    0
  • It was by Goschen's influence that in 1889 he was made under-secretary of finance in Egypt.
    0
    0
  • After Mr Gladstone's brief Home Rule Ministry in 1886 he entered Lord Salisbury's next Cabinet again as Irish secretary, making way for Lord Randolph Churchill as leader of the House; but troubles with his eyesight compelled him to resign in 1887, and meanwhile Mr Goschen replaced Lord Randolph as chancellor of the exchequer.
    0
    0
  • From 1888 to 1892 Sir Michael Hicks Beach returned to active work as president of the Board of Trade, and in 1895 - Mr Goschen being transferred to the Admiralty - he again became chancellor of the exchequer.
    0
    0
  • The free-trade Unionists, with the duke of Devonshire, Lord Goschen, Lord James and Lord Hugh Cecil, as their chief representatives, started a Free Food league in opposition to Mr Chamberlain's Tariff Reform league; and at a great meeting at Queen's Hall, London, on the 24th of November their attitude was made plain.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Its place was taken by another scheme drawn up by Mr (afterwards Lord) Goschen.
    0
    0
  • He swept away in doing so many of the advantages which the owner of real estate and the life tenant of settled property had previously enjoyed, and drove home a principle which Goschen had tentatively introduced a few years before by increasing the rate of the duty with the amount of the estate.
    0
    0
  • Lord Harting ton and Mr Goschen were not included in this administration.
    0
    0
  • In November Lord Hartington and Mr Goschen were in Dublin, and addressed a great loyalist meeting there.
    0
    0
  • Next day the visitors were entertained by Lord Salisbury at Hatfield, the duke of Devonshire, Mr Balfour, Mr Goschen and Mr Chamberlain being present.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Free-trade unionists like Lord Goschen and Lord Hugh Cecil, and the Liberal leaders - for whom Mr Asquith became the principal spokesman, though Lord Rosebery's criticisms also had considerable weight - found new matter in Mr Chamberlain's speeches for their contention that any radical change in the traditional English fiscal policy, established now for sixty years, would only result in evil.
    0
    0