Glossarium sentence example

glossarium
  • Of his numerous works the most important are the Glossarium ad scriptores mediae et infimae latinitatis (Paris, 1678), and the Glossarium ad scriptores mediae et infimae graecitatis (Lyons, 1688), which are indispensable aids to the student of the history and literature of the middle ages.
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  • To the three original volumes of the Latin Glossarium, three supplementary volumes were added by the Benedictines of St Maur (Paris, 1733-1736), and a further addition of four volumes (Paris, 1766), by a Benedictine, Pierre Carpentier (1697-1767).
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  • An edition of the Greek Glossarium was published at Breslau in 1889.
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  • See Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.
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  • Ihre's masterpiece is the Glossarium sueogothicum (1769), a historical dictionary with many valuable examples from the ancient monuments of the language.
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  • Besides those quoted in the notes, the reader may consult with advantage Du Cange's Glossarium, s.v.
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  • See, Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.
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  • See Joseph Bingham, Origines ecclesiasticae (1840); Du Cange, Glossarium med.
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  • See Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue francaise (Paris, 1895), for numerous examples of the use of the word vassal; also Du Cange, Glossarium, s.
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  • Du Cange, Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis, ed.
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  • See du Cange, Glossarium, s.
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  • Mitra, even as late as the 15th century, retained its simple meaning of cap (see Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.); to Isidore of Seville it is specifically a woman's cap. Infula, which in late ecclesiastical usage was to be confined to mitre (and its dependent bands) and chasuble, meant originally a piece of cloth, or the sacred fillets used in pagan worship, and later on came to be used of any ecclesiastical vestment, and there is no evidence for its specific application to the liturgical head-dress earlier than the 12th century.
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  • Zeumer, p. 55) and from various provisions of the Salic law (see du Cange, Glossarium, s.
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  • This, indeed, was its original meaning, the cappa having been an outer garment common to men and women whether clerical or lay (see Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.).
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