Girondins sentence example

girondins
  • In the strife which soon broke out between the Girondins and the Jacobins he took no decided part, but occupied himself mainly with the legal and legislative work which went on almost without intermission even during the Terror.
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  • At the close of 1794 he also used his tact and eloquence on behalf of the restoration of the surviving Girondins to the Convention, from which they had been driven by the coup d'etat of the 3 1st of May 1793.
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  • Placed under arrest with the Girondins, he escaped to Rennes where he drew up a pamphlet denouncing the constitution of 1793 under the curious title Le Dernier Crime de Lanjuinais (Rennes, 1793).
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  • He set about his greatest prose work, the Histoire des Girondins, which at first appeared periodically, and was published as a whole in 1847.
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  • The war was now the question, and Marat saw clearly that it was to serve the purposes of the Royalists and the Girondins, who thought of themselves alone.
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  • The king dead, the months from January to May 1793 were spent in an unrelenting struggle between Marat and the Girondins.
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  • Marat despised the ruling party because they had suffered nothing for the republic, because they talked too much of their feelings and their antique virtue, because they had for their own virtues plunged the country into war; while the Girondins hated Marat as representative of that rough red republicanism which would not yield itself to a Roman republic, with themselves for tribunes, orators and generals.
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  • The Girondins conquered at first in the Convention, and ordered that Marat should be tried before the Revolutionary Tribunal.
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  • The fall of the Girondins on the 31st of May was a triumph for Marat.
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  • The skin disease he had contracted in the subterranean haunts was rapidly closing his life; he could only ease his pain by sitting in a warm bath, where he wrote his journal; and accused the Girondins, who were trying to raise France against Paris.
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  • Sitting thus on the 13th of July he heard in the evening a young woman begging to be admitted to see him, saying that she brought news from Caen, where the escaped Girondins were trying to rouse Normandy.
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  • Hence the name Brissotins, coined by Camille Desmoulins, which was sometimes substituted for that of Girondins, sometimes closely coupled with it.
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  • His association with the Girondins nearly involved him in their fall, in spite of his vigorous republicanism.
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  • The humiliation of the king and queen after their capture at Varennes; the compulsory acceptance of the constitution; the plain incompetence of the new Legislative Assembly; the growing violence of the Parisian mob, and the ascendency of the Jacobins at the Common Hall; the fierce day of the 20th of June (1792), when the mob flooded the Tuileries, and the bloodier day of the 10th of August, when the Swiss guard was massacred and the royal family flung into prison; the murders in the prisons in September; the trial and execution of the king in January (1793); the proscription of the Girondins in June, the execution of the queen in October - if we realize the impression likely to be made upon the sober and homely English imagination by such a heightening of horror by horror, we may easily understand how people came to listen to Burke's voice as the voice of inspiration, and to look on his burning anger as the holy fervour of a prophet of the Lord.
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  • The Left consisted of the Jacobins, a term which still included the party afterwards known as the Girondins or Girondists - so termed because several of their leaders came from the region of the Gironde in southern France.
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  • The Girondins could claim the most brilliant orators, Vergniaud, Guadet, Isnard.
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  • The Girondins desired war in the hope that it would enable them to abolish monarchy altogether.
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  • The Girondins made a last advance to Louis, offering to save the monarchy if he would accept them as ministers.
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  • He with many other Girondins had been marked for slaughter in the original project.
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  • Thenceforwards the name of Jacobin was confined to the smaller and more fanatical group, while the rest came to be known as the Girondins.
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  • The Girondins, numbering perhaps 180, formed the Right.
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  • Whichever side prevailed destroyed its adversaries Jacobins only to divide afresh and renew the strife until the and Girondins.
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  • Although the leaders on both sides were of the middle class, the Girondins represented the bourgeoisie, the Jacobins represented the populace.
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  • The Girondins desired a speedy return to law and order; the Jacobins thought that they could keep power only by violence.
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  • The Jacobins leant on the revolutionary commune and the mob of Paris; the Girondins leant on the thriving burghers of the provincial cities.
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  • The Girondins numbered many orators, but not one man of action.
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  • The Girondins had no organized force at their disposal.
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  • The Girondins addressed themselves to provincials who had lost the power of initiative.
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  • The Girondins condemned the September massacres and dreaded the Parisian populace.
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  • But the Girondins gained no tangible result from this wordy warfare.
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  • The Girondins wished to spare Louis, but were afraid of incurring the reproach of royalism.
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  • The Mountain called for immediate sentence of death; the Girondins desired an appeal to the people of France.
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  • Danton strove to unite all partisans of the Revolution in defence of the country; but the Girondins, detesting his character and fearing his ambition, rejected all advances.
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  • The Commune of Paris and the journalists who were its mouthpieces, Hebert and Marat, aimed frankly at destroying the Girondins.
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  • In April the Girondins Revolt the lives and properties of all who were guilty of wealth or of moderate opinions, while the representatives on mission deposed the municipal authorities and placed their own creatures in power.
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  • But in the north the appeals of such Girondins as escaped from Paris were of no avail.
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  • The death of Marat, who was stabbed by Charlotte Corday to avenge the Girondins, gave yet another pretext for terrible measures of repression.
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  • Twenty-one Girondin deputies were next brought to the bar and, with the exception of Valaze who stabbed himself, were beheaded on the last day of October, Madame Roland and other Girondins of note suffered later.
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  • Enclosed by Hanriot's troops and thoroughly cowed, the Convention decreed the arrest of the Committee of Twelve and of twenty-two principal Girondins.
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  • The Commune of Paris, which had overthrown the Girondins, was jealous of the Committee of Public Safety, which meant to be supreme.
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  • In December 73 members of the Convention who had been imprisoned for protesting against the violence done to the Girondins on the 2nd of June 1793 were allowed to resume their seats, and gave a decisive majority to the anti-Jacobins.
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  • They sought for an understanding with the Girondins and Feuillants, and some went so far as.
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  • Neither Royalists nor Feuillants nor Girondins had the instinct of government.
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  • On his return to Paris, Herault was several times president of the Convention, notably on the 2nd of June 1793, the occasion of the attack on the Girondins, and on the 10th of August 1793, on which the passing of the new constitution was celebrated.
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  • At the same time the application of the Civil Constitution of the Clergy roused the whole of western La Vende; and in face of the danger threatened by the refractory clergy and by the army of the migrs, the Girondins set about confounding the court with the Feuillants in the minds of the public, and compromising Louis XVI.
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  • Louis XVI.s veto and the dismissal of the Girondin ministrythanks to an intrigue of Dumouriez, analogous to that of Mirabeau and as ineffectualdismayed the Feuillants and maddened the Girondins; the latter, to avert popular fury, turned it upon the king.
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  • The Girondins in the Convention played the part of the Feuillants in the Legislative Assembly.
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  • They drew support from the Parisian democracy, and considered the decentralization of the Girondins as endangering Frances unity, circumstances demanding a strong and highly concentrated government; they opposed a republic on the model of that of Rome to the Polish republic of the Gironde.
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  • The Girondins were the first to take the lead; in order to retain.
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  • On the other hand, after the 23rd of September they declared Paris dangerous for the Convention, and wanted to reduce it to eighty-three influential members Danton and the Mountain responded by decreeing the unity and indivisibility of the Republic, in order to emphasize the suspicions of federalism which weighed upon the Girondins.
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  • In order to preserve popular favor and their direction of the Republic, the Girondins had not dared to pronounce against the sentence of death, but had demanded an appeal to the people which was rejected; morally weakened by this equivocal attitude they were still more so by foreign events.
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  • Girondins and Jacobins unjustly accused one ar.other of leaving the traitors, the conspirators, the stipendiaries of Coblenz unpunished.
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  • The transformation of the provisional executive council into the Committee of Public Safetyomnipotent save in financial matterswas voted because the Girondins meant to control it; but Danton got the upper hand (April 6).
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  • The complete success of the Girondin proposals; the arrest of Hbertthe violent editor of the Pre Duc/zene; the insurrection of the Girondins of Lyons against the Montagnard Commune; the bad news from La Vendethe military reverses; and the economic situation which had compelled the fixing of a maximum price of corn (May 4) excited the moral insurrections of May 31 and June 2.
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  • Despite the efforts of Danton and the Committee of Public Safety, the arrest of the Girondins sealed the victory of the Mountain.
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  • The Girondins and their adversaries were differentiated by neither religious dissensions nor political divergency, but merely by a question of time.
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  • The Girondins, when in power, had had scruples which had not troubled them while scaling the ladder; idols of Paris, they had flattered her in turn, and when Paris scorned them they sought support in the provinces.
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  • He did good by moderating the revolutionary and destructive ardour of the Parisian populace in 1848; but he had been perhaps more responsible than any other single person for bringing about the events of that year by the vague and frothy republican declamation of his Histoire des Girondins.
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  • While excelling him in suppleness and dexterity, he lacked the force of character possessed by the great "tribune of the people"; and his influence was gradually eclipsed by that of the more ardent and determined champions of democracy, the Girondins and the Jacobins.
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  • The dominant group among these was that of the Girondins or Girondists, so called because its most brilliant members had been elected in the Gironde (see GIRONDISTS).
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  • He had, however, entered the ranks of the Girondins, and had voted in the trial of the king against the death penalty and in favour of the appeal to the people.
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