Giolitti sentence example

giolitti
  • The management of finance was scarcely satisfactory, for though Giolitti, who had succeeded Magliani and Perazzi at the treasury, suppressed the formers illusory pension fund, he lacked the fibre necessary to deal with the enormous deficit of nearly 10,000,000 in 1888-1889, the existence of which both i Perazzi and he had recognized.
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  • The influence of Giolitti was based largely upon the favor of a court clique, and especially of Rattazzi, minister of the royal household.
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  • Giolitti scarcely improved matters by creating Tanlongo a member of the senate, and by denying in parliament the existence of any mismanagement.
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  • For a time Giolitti successfully opposed inquiry into the conditions of the state banks, but on the 21st of March was compelled to sanction an official investigation by a parliamentary commission composed of seven members.
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  • It established that all Italian cabinets since 1880 had grossly neglected the state banks; that the two preceding cabinets had been aware of the irregularities committed by Tanlongo; that Tanlongo had heavily subsidized the press, paying as much as 20,000 for that purpose in 1888 alone; that a number of deputies, including several ex-ministers, had received from him loans of a considerable amount, which they had apparently made no effort to refund; that Giolitti had deceived the Chamber with regard to the state banks, and was open tosuspicion of having,after the arrest of Tanlongo, abstracted a number of documents from the latters papers before placing the remainder in the hands of the judicial authorities.
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  • The report, however, sealed the fate of the Giolitti cabinet, and on the 24th of November it resigned amid general execration.
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  • Apart from the lack of scruple manifested by Giolitti in the bank scandals, he exhibited incompetence in the conduct of foreign and home affairs.
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  • Giolitti removed the prefect of Rome for not having prevented an expression of popular anger, and presented formal excuses to the French consul at Messina for a demonstration against that consulate.
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  • At home Giolitti displayed the same weakiess.
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  • Instead of maintaining a firm policy, Giolitti allowed the movement to spread until, towards the autumn of 1893, he became alarmed and drafted troops into the island, though in numbers insufficient to restore order.
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  • In order to diminish the gold premium, which under Giolitti had risen to 16%, forced currency was given to the existing notes of the banks of Italy, Naples and Sicily, while special state notes were issued to meet immediate currency needs.
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  • On the 11th of December Giolitti laid these and other papers before the Chamber, in the hope of ruining Crispi, but upon examination most of thm were found to be worthless, and the rest of so private a nature as to be unfit for publication.
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  • The effect of the incident was rather to increase detestation of Giolitti than to damage Crispi.
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  • The latter, indeed, prosecuted the former for libel and for abuse of his position when premier, but after many vicissitudes, including the flight of Giolitti to Berlin in.
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  • On the 11th of May 1893 he denounced the treaty of Uccialli, but the Giolitti cabillet, absorbed by the bank scandals, paid no heed to his action.
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  • The fall of Signor Sonnino, the disappointment caused by the non-fulfilment of the expectations to which his advent to power had given rise throughout Italy and the dearth of influential statesmen, made the return to power of Signor Giolitti inevitable.
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  • In November Signor Gianturco died, and Signor Pietro Bertolini took his place as minister of public works; the latter proved perhaps the ablest member of the cabinet, but the acceptance of office under Giolitti of a man who had been one of the most trusted and valuable lieutenants of Signor Sonnino marked a further step in the dgringolade of that statesmans party, and was attributed to the fact that Signor Bertolini resented not having had a place in the late Sonnino ministry.
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  • He was minister of war in the Rudini and Giolitti cabinets of 1891-1893.
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  • The vigorous attacks of the Opposition, led by Baron Sonnino, induced Giolitti to adjourn the debate until the autumn, when, the Cabinet having been defeated on a point of procedure, he resigned (Dec. 2).
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  • When in March 1911 the latter resigned in consequence of the hostile vote of the Radicals and the resignation of its two Radical members, Giolitti was again called upon to form a Government (March 3 1).
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  • After the Armistice the unsatisfactory consequences of the peace negotiations, the heavy burden of suffering and loss caused by the war, and, above all, the intolerable internal policy of the Nitti Cabinet, brought about the return of Giolitti to the sphere of practical politics once more.
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  • After his fall he resumed his functions as president of the senate; but on the advent of the third Giolitti cabinet, he was not reappointed to that position.
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  • Fortunately the new Giolitti and Vesnie Cabinets showed equal moderation and skill in restraining the hotheads on both sides, and the new Foreign Minister, Count Sforza, was assisted by a personal knowledge of Serbian and Balkan problems all too rare among western statesmen.
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  • He was again minister of the treasury from November 1903 to March 1905 in Giolitti's second administration, and for the third time from February to May 1906, under Sonnino's premiership. During the latter term of office he achieved the conversion of the Italian 5% debt (reduced to 4% by the tax) to 31% to be eventually lowered to 32%, an operation which other ministers had attempted without success; although the actual conversion was not completed until after the fall of the cabinet of which he formed part the merit is entirely his.
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  • In December 1893 the impotence of the Giolitti cabinet to restore public order, then menaced by disturbances in Sicily and in Lunigiana, gave rise to a general demand that Crispi should return to power.
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  • In June 1920, when the Giolitti Government was formed with the programme of a reconstitution of the Italian State and of radical reforms, Croce (who had been a senator of the Kingdom of Italy since 1920) was asked to accept the office of Minister of Public Instruction.
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  • In 1921 he retired from office on the resignation of the Giolitti Ministry.
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  • When Giolitti became premier for the second time in 1903, Tittoni became his Foreign 141inister.
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  • On the resignation of Giolitti in March 1905 Tittoni became interim premier for a few days and remained in the Fortis Cabinet as Foreign Minister.
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  • A few months later he was appointed ambassador in London (March 1906), but in May, on the fall of the Sonnino Cabinet and the return of Giolitti to power, he was again summoned to the Consulta.
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  • He remained in office until the fall of Giolitti in Dec. 1909.
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  • When the World War broke out, in spite of his Triplicist policy he openly expressed himself in favour of Italian neutrality, and on Italy's entry into the war he was careful not to compromise himself with Giolitti's attitude.
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  • On the fall of the Rudini cabinet in May 1892, Giolitti, with the help of a court clique, succeeded to the premiership. His term of office was marked by misfortune and misgovernment.
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  • A bank law, passed by Giolitti failed to effect an improvement.
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  • The senate declined to admit Tanlongo, whom Giolitti, in consequence of an interpellation in parliament upon the condition of the Banca Romana, was obliged to arrest and prosecute.
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  • During the prosecution Giolitti abused his position as premier to abstract documents bearing on the case.
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  • Its report, though acquitting Giolitti of personal dishonesty, proved disastrous to his political position, and obliged him to resign.
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  • His policy of never interfering in strikes and leaving even violent demonstrations undisturbed at first proved successful, but indiscipline and disorder grew to such a pitch that Zanardelli, already in bad health, resigned, and Giolitti succeeded him as prime minister (November 1903).
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  • When Sonnino became premier in February 1906, Giolitti did not openly oppose him, but his followers did, and Sonnino was defeated in May, Giolitti becoming prime minister once more.
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  • After the fall of the Giolitti cabinet in 1893, Zanardelli made a strenuous but unsuccessful attempt to form an administration.
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  • In 1892 he entered the Giolitti cabinet as minister for foreign affairs, accompanying, in that capacity, the king and queen of Italy to Potsdam, but showed weakness towards France on the occasion of the massacre of Italian workmen at Aigues-Mortes.
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  • He became Minister of Agriculture in the Pelloux Cabinet (1898-9), and in 1905, on the fall of the Giolitti Cabinet, became premier.
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  • Giolitti became premier, the Marquis di San Giuliano was selected as undersecretary for agriculture, while in the Pelloux ministry (1899-1900) he held the portfolio of posts and telegraphs.
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  • On Giolitti's resignation in March 1914, San Giuliano retained office under Sig.
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  • He was Minister of Education in the Giolitti-Tittoni Cabinet of 1903-5, and of Justice in the Giolitti Cabinet of 1907-9, and again under Salandra in March 1914.
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  • He was overthrown in May 1892 by a vote of the Chamber and succeeded by Giolitti.
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  • Giolitti resigned, Sig.
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  • He made his reputation as an authority on economic and financial questions, and was Minister of Agriculture, Industry and Trade in the Giolitti Cabinet of 1911-4.
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  • The exasperation of the majority of the country at his policy, and the indignation aroused by his treatment of the Dalmatians in Rome, as well as his failure to secure a settlement of the Adriatic problem, led to his fall in June 1920, thus leaving the way open for the return of Giolitti.
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  • At the end of July the trial of the persons implicated in the Banca Romana scandal revealed the fact that among the documents abstracted by Giolitti from the papers of the bank manager, Tanlongo, were several bearing upon Crispis political and private life.
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  • Nevertheless public confidence in the efficacy of the parliamentary system and in the honesty of politicians was seriously diminished by these unsavoury occurrences, which, in combination with the acquittal of all the defendants in the Banca Romana trial, and the abandonment of the proceedings against Giolitti, reinforced to an alarming degree the propaganda of the revolutionary parties.
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  • Though irregular, his action was to some extent justified by the depletion of the secret service fund under Giolitti and by the abnormal circumstances prevailing in 1893-1894, when he had been obliged to quell the insurrections in Sicily and Massa-Carrara.
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  • The unpopularity of the ministry forced Signor Giolitti, the minister of the interior, to resign (June 1903), and he was followed by Admiral Bettolo, whose administration had been violently attacked by the Socialists; in October Signor Zanardelli, the premier, resigned on account of his health, and the king entrusted the formation of the cabinet to Signor Giolitti.
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  • Signor Giolitti wished to conciliate the Vatican by facilitating religious education, which was desired by the majority of the parents, but he did not wish to offend the Freemasons and other anti-clericals too much, as they could always give trouble at awkward moments.
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  • But after the Armistice the unsatisfactory consequences of the peace negotiations, the heavy burden of suffering and loss caused by the war, and, above all, the intolerable internal policy of the Nitti Cabinet, which seemed prepared to hand the country over to the Bolshevist Socialists, brought about the return of Giolitti to the sphere of practical politics once more.
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  • When Nitti was forced by the impossibility of governing the country to resign for the third and last time on May 20 1920, the return of Giolitti was the inevitable alternative.
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  • After Giolitti's renunciation of a mandate in Albania the claim to Skutari became untenable, and at last in 1921 the Supreme Council sanctioned the frontiers assigned to Albania in 1913.
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