Gildas sentence example

gildas
  • To the north as far as the rocky point of St Gildas, sheltering the mouth of the Loire, the shore, often occupied by salt marshes (marshes of Poitou and Brittany), is low-lying and hollowed by deep bays sheltered by large islands, those of Olron and Re lying opposite the ports of Rochefort and La Rochelle, while Noirmoutier closes the Bay of Bourgneuf.
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  • Two short treatises exist, purporting to be lives of Gildas, and ascribed respectively to the 11th and 12th centuries; but the writers of both are believed to have confounded two, if not more, persons that had borne the name.
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  • The writings of Gildas have come down to us under the title of Gildae Sapientis de excidio Britanniae liber querulus.
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  • These faults are of less importance during the period when Greek and Roman writers notice the affairs of Britain; but they become more serious when, as is the case from nearly the beginning of the 5th century to the date of his death, Gildas's brief narrative is our only authority for most of what passes current as the history of our island during those years.
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  • Gildas's treatise was first published in 1525 by Polydore Vergil, but with many avowed alterations and omissions.
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  • The text of Gildas founded on Gale's edition collated with two other MSS., with elaborate introductions, is included in the Monumenta historica Britannica, edited by Petrie and Sharpe (London, 1848).
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  • An identical rite existed among the 12th century Cathars, and in the Celtic church of Gildas every presbyter was a Peter.
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  • The author's name is unknown; but he is, after Gildas, our earliest authority for the facts of the English conquest of England.
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  • During his early years the Irish Church was reformed by Gildas and Finian of Clonard, and numerous monasteries were founded which made Ireland renowned as a centre of learning.
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  • According to Gildas it was for protection against these incursions that the Britons decided to call in the Saxons.
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  • According to Gildas this event was followed by a period of peace for at least forty-four years.
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  • - Gildas states that in the time of the Romans Britain contained twenty-eight cities (civitates), besides a number of fortresses (castella).
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  • Gildas, writing in the 6th century, speaks of the twentyeight cities of the Britons.
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  • This tradition - which is given only as such by Malmesbury himself - is not confirmed, and there is no mention of it in either Gildas or Bede.
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  • Living on for some time apart (we do not know exactly where), after his flight from St Gildas, Abelard wrote, among other things, his famous Historia Calamitatum, and thus moved her to pen her first Letter, which remains an unsurpassed utterance of human passion and womanly devotion; the first being followed by the two other Letters, in which she finally accepted the part of resignation which, now as a brother to a sister, Abelard commended to her.
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  • The history of that conquest itself is mainly inferential; there is the flebilis narratio of Gildas, vague and rhetorical, moral rather than historical in motive, and written more than a century after the conquest had begun, and the narrative of the Welsh Nennius, who wrote two and a half centuries after Gildas, and makes no critical distinction between the deeds of dragons and those of Anglo-Saxons.
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  • It was printed with the works of Gildas and Nennius, under the editorship of Charles Julius Bertram, professor of English in the academy of Copenhagen in the middle of the 18th century, with the following special title: "Richardi Corinensis monachi Westmonasteriensis de situ Britanniae libri duo.
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  • The earliest reference to Ambrosius is in a tract called De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae, written by a 6th century cleric named Gildas.
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  • Gildas chastens his fellow Britons for rebellions that he regards as sinful.
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  • This seems confirmed by Gildas' use of tyrannus where Magnus Maximus is concerned, who indeed usurped the imperial throne.
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  • To the north as far as the rocky point of St Gildas, sheltering the mouth of~he Loire, the shore, often occupied by salt marshes (marshes of Poitou and Brittany), is low-lying and hollowed by deep bays sheltered by large islands, those of Olron and Re lying opposite the ports of Rochefort and La Rochelle, while Noirmoutier closes the Bay of Bourgneuf.
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  • Unfortunately, on almost every point on which he touches, the statements of Gildas are vague and obscure.
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  • The chief authorities whom Nennius followed were Gildas' De excidio Britonum, Eusebius, the Vita Patricii of Murichu Maccu Machtheni, the Collectanea of Tirechan, the Liber occupationis (an Irish work on the settlement of Ireland), the Liber de sex aetatibus mundi, the chronicle of Prosper of Aquitaine, the Liber beati Germani.
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  • The principal buildings are the church of St Esprit (13th century) now secularized; the Renaissance church of St Gildas; the town-hall (18th century); and, at a short distance from the town, the Carthusian monastery, now a deaf and dumb institute, on the site of the battle of 1364, at which Charles of Blois was defeated by John of Montfort (see Brittany: History).
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  • Gildas does not mention any dates, not even any regnal years.
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