Gesner sentence example

gesner
  • Gesner was then rector, an office to which Ernesti succeeded in 1734.
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  • Allamand of Bex, and the Professor Breitinger of Zurich, and opened a new one with the Professor Gesner of Göttingen.
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  • 2 Meanwhile the study received a great impulse from the appearance, at Zurich in 1555, of the third book of Conrad Gesner's Historia Animalium " qvi est de Auium natura," and at Paris in the same year of Pierre Belon's (Bellonius) Histoire de la nature des Oyseaux.
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  • Gesner brought an amount of erudition, hitherto unequalled, to bear upon his subject; and, making due allowance for the times in which he wrote, his judgment must in most respects be deemed excellent.
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  • Both his work and that of Gesner were illustrated with woodcuts, many of which display much spirit and regard to accuracy.
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  • The work is almost wholly a compilation, and that not of the most discriminative kind, while a peculiar jealousy of Gesner is continuously displayed, though his statements are very constantly quoted - nearly always as those of " Ornithologus," his name appearing but few times in the text, and not at all in the list of authors cited.
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  • The Swiss professor, Konrad Gesner (1516-1565), is the most voluminous and instructive of these earliest writers on systematic zoology, and was so highly esteemed that his Historia animalium was republished a hundred Gesner.
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  • The most prominent name between that of Gesner and Linnaeus in the history of systematic zoology is that of John Ray (1628-1705).
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  • Gesner's figure of the aurochs, or as he calls it "thur," given in the Icones to his History of Animals, was probably adapted from Herberstein's.
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  • Jean Gesner (1709-1790), a Swiss physician and botanist, states that at the end of the 18th century there were 1600 botanic gardens in Europe.
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  • In the same year Johann Gesner (1709-1790) set forth the theory of a great period of time, which he estimated at 80,000 years, for the elevation of the shell-bearing levels of the Apennines to their present height above the sea.
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  • But even Linnaeus could not clear himself of the confusion, and unhappily misapplied the name Meleagris, undeniably belonging to the guinea-fowl, as the generic term for what we now know as the turkey, adding thereto as its specific designation the word gallopavo, taken from the Gallopava of C. Gesner, who, though not wholly free from error, was less mistakep than some of his contemporaries and even successors.'
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  • In 1555 both sexes were characteristically figured by Belon (Oyseaux, p. 249), as was the cock by Gesner in the same year, and these are the earliest representations of the bird known to exist.
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  • The best collection is by C. Horstmann, Yorkshire Writers: Richard Rolle of Hampole; An English Father of the Church and his Followers ' Gesner in 1 555 said that the bird was thus called, and for this reason, near Strassburg, but the name seems not to be generally used in Germany, where the bird is commonly called Rake, apparently from its harsh note.
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  • It does not seem to have been commonly known till the middle of the 16th century, when John Caius sent a description and figure, with the name Gallus Mauritanus, to Gesner, who published both in his Paralipomena in 1555, and in the same year Belon also gave a notice and woodcut under the name of Poulle de la Guinee; but while the former authors properly referred their bird to the ancient Meleagris, the latter confounded the Meleagris and the turkey.
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  • To Turner's name, repeated by Gesner and other authors, we owe the introduction by Linnaeus of Sterna into scientific nomenclature.
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  • In 1555 he published a new edition of Conrad Gesner's Epitome of his Bibliotheca universalis (a list of all authors who had written in Greek, Latin or Hebrew), in 1574 a new edition of the Bibliotheca itself, and in 1575 an annotated edition of the Antonine Itinerary.
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  • That he anticipated in any manner the inductive philosophy cannot be contended; his botanical studies did not lead him, like his contemporary Konrad von Gesner, to any idea of a natural system of classification, and he rejected with the utmost arrogance and violence of language the discoveries of Copernicus.
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  • Considering his long life and reputation Aurispa produced little: Latin translations of the commentary of Hierocles on the golden verses of Pythagoras (1474) and of Philisci Consolatoria ad Ciceronem from Dio Cassius (not published till 1510); and, according to Gesner, a translation of the works of Archimedes.
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  • Semler he co-operated in the revolution of Lutheran theology, and in conjunction with Gesner he instituted a new school in ancient literature.
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  • Allamand of Bex, and the Professor Breitinger of Zurich, and opened a new one with the Professor Gesner of Göttingen.
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  • On the death of Johann Matthias Gesner at Göttingen in 1761, the vacant chair was refused first by Ernesti and then by Ruhnken, who persuaded Miinchhausen, the Hanoverian minister and principal curator of the university, to bestow it on Heyne (1763).
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