Gergonne sentence example

gergonne
  • John Casey, professor of mathematics at the Catholic university of Dublin, has given elementary demonstrations founded on the theory of similitude and coaxal circles which are reproduced in his Sequel to Euclid; an analytical solution by Gergonne is given in Salmon's Conic Sections.
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  • There is added an important Appendix, consisting of the papers from Gergonne's Annales which are referred to in the text above.
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  • Servois (Gergonne's Annales, 1813) a very remarkable comment, in which was contained the only yet discovered trace of an anticipation of the method of Hamilton.
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  • When the refracting curve is a circle and the rays emanate from any point, the locus of the secondary caustic is a Cartesian oval, and the evolute of this curve is the required diacaustic. These curves appear to have been first discussed by Gergonne.
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  • Gergonne had shown that when a number of the intersections of two curves of the (p+q)th degree lie on a curve of the pth degree the rest lie on a curve of the qth degree.
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  • Plucker finally (Gergonne Ann., 1828-1829) showed how many points must be taken on a curve of any degree so that curves of the same degree (infinite in number) may be drawn through them, and proved that all the points, beyond the given ones, in which these curves intersect the given one are fixed by the original choice.
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  • In this memoir by Gergonne, the theory of duality is very clearly and explicitly stated; for instance, we find " da p s la geometrie plane, a chaque theoreme ii en repond necessairement un autre qui s'en deduit en echangeant simplement entre eux les deux mots points et droites; tandis que dans la geometrie de l'espace ce sont les mots points et plans qu'il faut echanger entre eux pour passer d'un theoreme a son correlatif "; and the plan is introduced of printing correlative theorems, opposite to each other, in two columns.
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  • And, assuming the above theory of geometrical imaginaries, a curve such that m of its points are situate in an arbitrary line is said to be of the order m; a curve such that n of its tangents pass through an arbitrary point is said to be of the class n; as already appearing, this notion of the order and class of a curve is, however, due to Gergonne.
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