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george washington

george washington Sentence Examples

  • A considerable part of this land was surveyed by George Washington between 1748 and 1751.

  • The site of the city was a part of the Castle Hill estate of Thomas Walker (1715-1794), an intimate friend of George Washington.

  • Giddings (Chicago, 1892), by his son-inlaw, George Washington Julian (1817-1899), a Free-soil leader and a representative in Congress in 1849-1851, a Republican representative in Congress in 1861-1871, a Liberal Republican in the campaign of 1872, and afterwards a Democrat.

  • He wrote: Life and Letters of George Cabot (1877); Alexander Hamilton (1882), Daniel Webster (1883) and George Washington (2 vols., 1889), in the "American Statesmen" series; A Short History of the English Colonies in America (1881); Studies in History (1884); Boston (1891), in the "Historic Towns" series; Historical and Political Essays (1892); with Theodore Roosevelt, Hero Tales from American History (1895); Certain Accepted Heroes (1897); The Story of the American Revolution (2 vols., 1898); The War with Spain (1899); A Fighting Frigate (1902); A Frontier Town (1906); and, with J.

  • The American Congress at Philadelphia, acting for all the thirteen colonies, voted general defensive measures, called out troops and appointed George Washington of Virginia commander-in-chief.

  • There is no legal limitation to his re-eligibility any number of times; but tradition, dating from the refusal of George Washington to be rioniinated for a third term, has virtually established the rule that no person shall be president for more than two continuous terms, If the president dies, the vice-president steps into his place; and if the latter also dies in office, the succession passes to the secretary of state.f The president receives a salary of $75,000 a year, besides $25,000 a year for travelling expenses, and has an official residence called the Executive Mansion, or more familiarly the White House.

  • Three parks, Washington, Cushing and Atkinson, are maintained by the city; and there are a statue of George Washington (1879), by J.

  • In 1798 its name was changed to Washington Academy, in recognition of a gift from George Washington of some shares of canal stock, which he refused to receive from the Virginia legislature.

  • He was succeeded by his son, General George Washington Custis Lee (b.

  • is City Park of loo acres, with lakes and fountains, and monuments to the memory of Alexander von Humboldt, George Washington and T.

  • Foremost among the city's many monuments is that erected to the memory of George Washington.

  • Lawton; there is a Spanish War Monument; the grounds are noted for their natural beauty, and on the brow of a hill commanding a magnificent view of the city is Arlington House (1802), the residence of George Washington Parke Custis (1781-1857), grandson of Martha Washington, and afterwards of General Robert E.

  • 4 The name was changed when the offer of the George Washington Memorial Association to build a $500,000 memorial building was accepted.

  • C. Ford, Writings of George Washington (14 vols., ibid., 1889-93); W.

  • Ford's True George Washington (Philadelphia, 1896) and R.

  • The need of a larger supply of educated ministers for home and for mission work alike soon came to be profoundly felt, and resulted in the establishment of Columbian College, Washington (now George Washington University), with its theological department (1821), intended to be a national Baptist institution.

  • See Life and Writings of George Washington Doane (4 vols., New York, 1860-1861), edited b y his son, William Croswell Doane (b.

  • In 1753, after the French had laid formal claim to this region and the Ohio Land Company had been formed with a view to establishing a settlement within it, Robert Dinwiddie, governor of Virginia and a shareholder in the Ohio Company, sent George Washington with a letter to " the commandant of the French forces on the Ohio " (then stationed at Fort Le Bceuf, near the present Waterford, about 115 m.

  • The fort was finally recaptured by the English in 1758, as the result of an elaborate expedition (involving about 7000 troops) planned by Brigadier-General John Forbes (1710-1759), and prosecuted, with the assistance of Colonel George Washington and Colonel Henry Bouquet, in the face of great difficulties.

  • He wrote: The State: Elements of Historical and Practical Politics, Sketch of Institutional History and Administration (1889); The State and Federal Government of the United States (1891); Division and Reunion, 1829-1889 (1893) in the "Epochs of American History" series; An Old Master and Other Political Essays (1893); Mere Literature and Other Essays (1893); George Washington (1896), an excellent biography; the popular History of the American People (1902); Constitutional Government in the United States (1908), being Columbia University Lectures; and in the seventh volume of the Cambridge Modern History the chapter on "State Rights, 1850-1860."

  • Even so, the issue of the struggle was for long doubtful, and there were moments when it might have ended by a policy of wise concession; but the Americans, though reduced at times to desperate straits, had the advantage of fighting in their own country, and above all they found in George Washington a leader after the model of the English country gentleman who had upheld the standard of liberty against the Stuarts, and worthy of the great cause for which they fought.

  • After some months of preparation, in which he was hampered by administrative confusion and want of resources, he took the field with a picked column, in which George Washington served as a volunteer officer, intended to attack Fort Duquesne (Pittsburg, Pa.).

  • It was his chief concern to prevent the French from building in the Ohio Valley a chain of forts connecting their settlements in the north with those on the Gulf of Mexico; and in the autumn of 1753 he sent George Washington to Fort Le Boeuf, a newly established French post at what is now Waterford, Pennsylvania, with a message demanding the withdrawal of the French from English territory.

  • March 27 - President George Washington signs " an act to provide a naval armament.

  • commissary general of prisoners who was appointed his position by General George Washington.

  • After serving as president, George Washington became probably the new republic's largest whiskey distiller.

  • American presidents from George Washington to Benjamin Harrison practiced ethnic cleansing against the original inhabitants in America.

  • The noble figure of Simon Bolivar, the great South American liberator, has naturally been compared with that of George Washington.

  • A considerable part of this land was surveyed by George Washington between 1748 and 1751.

  • The site of the city was a part of the Castle Hill estate of Thomas Walker (1715-1794), an intimate friend of George Washington.

  • Taking up his residence at Philadelphia, he wrote a few months later to Thomas Russell expressing unqualified dislike of the American people, whom he was disappointed to find no more truly democratic in sentiment and no less attached to order and authority than the English; he described George Washington as a "high-flying aristocrat," and he found the aristocracy of money in America still less to his liking than the European aristocracy of birth.

  • Giddings (Chicago, 1892), by his son-inlaw, George Washington Julian (1817-1899), a Free-soil leader and a representative in Congress in 1849-1851, a Republican representative in Congress in 1861-1871, a Liberal Republican in the campaign of 1872, and afterwards a Democrat.

  • Other prominent members of the family were: Montgomery Schuyler (1814-1896) and his cousin Anthony (1816-1896), Protestant Episcopal clergymen; George Washington (1810-1888), treasurer of New York State in1863-1865and of Cornell University in1868-1874and author of Colonial New York: Philip Schuyler and his Family (2 vols., 1885); his son Eugene (1840-1890), who was long in the consular and diplomatic service of the United States, and who translated some of the novels of Tourgeniev and Tolstoi and wrote Peter the Great (1884) and American Diplomacy and the Furtherance of Commerce (1886); and Montgomery (b.

  • It is a quaint, old-fashioned city, with quiet, shady streets, and a number of buildings dating back to the 18th century; of these the most interesting is the old Christ Church in which George Washington and Robert E.

  • He wrote: Life and Letters of George Cabot (1877); Alexander Hamilton (1882), Daniel Webster (1883) and George Washington (2 vols., 1889), in the "American Statesmen" series; A Short History of the English Colonies in America (1881); Studies in History (1884); Boston (1891), in the "Historic Towns" series; Historical and Political Essays (1892); with Theodore Roosevelt, Hero Tales from American History (1895); Certain Accepted Heroes (1897); The Story of the American Revolution (2 vols., 1898); The War with Spain (1899); A Fighting Frigate (1902); A Frontier Town (1906); and, with J.

  • The American Congress at Philadelphia, acting for all the thirteen colonies, voted general defensive measures, called out troops and appointed George Washington of Virginia commander-in-chief.

  • There is no legal limitation to his re-eligibility any number of times; but tradition, dating from the refusal of George Washington to be rioniinated for a third term, has virtually established the rule that no person shall be president for more than two continuous terms, If the president dies, the vice-president steps into his place; and if the latter also dies in office, the succession passes to the secretary of state.f The president receives a salary of $75,000 a year, besides $25,000 a year for travelling expenses, and has an official residence called the Executive Mansion, or more familiarly the White House.

  • Three parks, Washington, Cushing and Atkinson, are maintained by the city; and there are a statue of George Washington (1879), by J.

  • In 1798 its name was changed to Washington Academy, in recognition of a gift from George Washington of some shares of canal stock, which he refused to receive from the Virginia legislature.

  • He was succeeded by his son, General George Washington Custis Lee (b.

  • is City Park of loo acres, with lakes and fountains, and monuments to the memory of Alexander von Humboldt, George Washington and T.

  • Foremost among the city's many monuments is that erected to the memory of George Washington.

  • Lawton; there is a Spanish War Monument; the grounds are noted for their natural beauty, and on the brow of a hill commanding a magnificent view of the city is Arlington House (1802), the residence of George Washington Parke Custis (1781-1857), grandson of Martha Washington, and afterwards of General Robert E.

  • Among many private institutions are the Washington City Orphan Asylum (1815); Lutheran Eye, Ear and Throat Infirmary (1889); Episcopal Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital (1897); Providence Hospital (1861; Sisters of Charity); George Washington University Hospital (1898); Georgetown University Hospital (1898); Columbia Hospital for Women (1866); Children's Hospital (1871); Washington Hospital for Foundlings (1887); Children's Temporary Home (1899; for negroes); a German Orphan Asylum (1879); Washington Home for Incurables (1889); Home for the Aged (1871); the National Lutheran Home (1890); the Methodist Home (1890) and Baptist Home (1880).

  • 4 The name was changed when the offer of the George Washington Memorial Association to build a $500,000 memorial building was accepted.

  • C. Ford, Writings of George Washington (14 vols., ibid., 1889-93); W.

  • Ford's True George Washington (Philadelphia, 1896) and R.

  • The need of a larger supply of educated ministers for home and for mission work alike soon came to be profoundly felt, and resulted in the establishment of Columbian College, Washington (now George Washington University), with its theological department (1821), intended to be a national Baptist institution.

  • See Life and Writings of George Washington Doane (4 vols., New York, 1860-1861), edited b y his son, William Croswell Doane (b.

  • In 1753, after the French had laid formal claim to this region and the Ohio Land Company had been formed with a view to establishing a settlement within it, Robert Dinwiddie, governor of Virginia and a shareholder in the Ohio Company, sent George Washington with a letter to " the commandant of the French forces on the Ohio " (then stationed at Fort Le Bceuf, near the present Waterford, about 115 m.

  • The fort was finally recaptured by the English in 1758, as the result of an elaborate expedition (involving about 7000 troops) planned by Brigadier-General John Forbes (1710-1759), and prosecuted, with the assistance of Colonel George Washington and Colonel Henry Bouquet, in the face of great difficulties.

  • He wrote: The State: Elements of Historical and Practical Politics, Sketch of Institutional History and Administration (1889); The State and Federal Government of the United States (1891); Division and Reunion, 1829-1889 (1893) in the "Epochs of American History" series; An Old Master and Other Political Essays (1893); Mere Literature and Other Essays (1893); George Washington (1896), an excellent biography; the popular History of the American People (1902); Constitutional Government in the United States (1908), being Columbia University Lectures; and in the seventh volume of the Cambridge Modern History the chapter on "State Rights, 1850-1860."

  • Even so, the issue of the struggle was for long doubtful, and there were moments when it might have ended by a policy of wise concession; but the Americans, though reduced at times to desperate straits, had the advantage of fighting in their own country, and above all they found in George Washington a leader after the model of the English country gentleman who had upheld the standard of liberty against the Stuarts, and worthy of the great cause for which they fought.

  • After some months of preparation, in which he was hampered by administrative confusion and want of resources, he took the field with a picked column, in which George Washington served as a volunteer officer, intended to attack Fort Duquesne (Pittsburg, Pa.).

  • It was his chief concern to prevent the French from building in the Ohio Valley a chain of forts connecting their settlements in the north with those on the Gulf of Mexico; and in the autumn of 1753 he sent George Washington to Fort Le Boeuf, a newly established French post at what is now Waterford, Pennsylvania, with a message demanding the withdrawal of the French from English territory.

  • "I should like to be a sailor," said George Washington.

  • Who has not heard of George Washington?

  • (The use of such practices continued into the scientific age: While Jenner was inoculating people with his new smallpox vaccine, doctors were draining half a gallon of blood from George Washington for his sore throat, a procedure that hastened his death.

  • Early presidents including George Washington and Thomas Jefferson did not have middle names.

  • Budding artists who are looking to put some formal education behind their design ambitions can take a class or work on an interior design degree at the Corcoran College of Art and Design or George Washington University.

  • I want to be beautiful like Tyra and fierce like MS Jay and George Washington.

  • After graduating from George Washington High School in 1990, Garner went on to Dennison University in Granville, Ohio where she originally majored in chemistry.

  • For example, who doesn't love hearing about how George Washington founded the American Empire in 95 B.C. and became a massive military power that went on to conquer the neighboring French two centuries later?

  • The George Washington University Biostatistics Center, 6110 Executive Blvd.

  • George Washington Parke Custis was the adopted son of the first President of the United States, George Washington.

  • Custis constructed the Arlington House as a living memorial to George Washington.

  • In 1857, after the death of George Washington Parke Custis, the couple's only child, Mary Ann Randolph Custis inherited the estate.

  • Following the death of George Washington Parke Custis, he returned to the Arlington House estate to be with his wife and become executor of the estate.

  • For example, you could use DNA testing to prove that your family is descended from George Washington - assuming you could obtain DNA from George Washington.

  • However, you would not be able to determine if George Washington was your great-great-great-great-grandfather.

  • If successful figures from George Washington to Christopher Paolini were homeschooled, who knows what heights your own children can reach?

  • For example, Discovery News reported on a study conducted by doctors at George Washington University that found that only moments before the actual moment of death, the brain has a sudden surge of brain activity.

  • College: Graduated in 1993 from George Washington University.

  • The Continental Congress gave George Washington the privilege of creating the first "official" Continental Army uniform, and in 1979 the Continental Army accepted the design for its national uniform.

  • In fact history takes it all the way back to George Washington and the uniforms worn in the Revolutionary War.

  • At that time, Congress passed a motion directed by General George Washington to dictate what the uniform would look like.

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