Gentz sentence example

gentz
  • His first sojourn was in Vienna, where the friendship of Gentz and the protection of Metternich opened to him the Venetian archives, of which many were preserved in that city - a virgin field, the value of which he first discovered, and which is still unexhausted.
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  • For a Prussian official to venture to give uncalled-for advice to his sovereign was a breach of propriety not calculated to increase his chances of favour; but it gave Gentz a conspicuous position in the public eye, which his brilliant talents and literary style enabled him to maintain.
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  • Private affairs also combined to urge Gentz to leave the Prussian service; for, mainly through his own fault, a separation with his wife was arranged.
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  • Before returning to Berlin to make arrangements for transferring himself finally to Vienna, Gentz paid a visit to London, where he made the acquaintance of Pitt and Granville, who were so impressed with his talents that, in addition to large money presents, he was guaranteed an annual pension by the British government in recognition of the value of the services of his pen against Bonaparte.
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  • This latter, the last of Gentz's works as an independent publicist, was a masterly expose of the actual political situation, and at the same time prophetic in its suggestions as to how this should be retrieved: "Through Germany Europe has perished, through Germany it must rise again."
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  • The writer was known, and it was in this connexion that Napoleon referred to him as "a wretched scribe named Gentz, one of those men without honour who sell themselves for money."
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  • Gentz, who from the winter of 1806 onwards divided his time between Prague and the Bohemian wateringplaces, seemed to devote himself wholly to the pleasures of society, his fascinating personality gaining him a ready reception in those exalted circles which were to prove of use to him later on in Vienna.
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  • In 1809, on the outbreak of war between Austria and France, Gentz was for the first time actively employed by the Austrian government under Stadion; he drafted the proclamation announcing the declaration of war (15th of April), and during the continuance of hostilities his pen was ceaselessly employed.
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  • Of Metternich, Stadion's successor, he had at the outset no high opinion, and it was not till 1812 that there sprang up between the two men the close relations that were to ripen into life-long friendship. But when Gentz returned to Vienna as Metternich's adviser and henchman, he was no longer the fiery patriot who had sympathized and corresponded with Stein in the darkest days of German depression and in fiery periods called upon all Europe to free itself from foreign rule.
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  • For ten years, from 1812 onward, Gentz was in closest touch with all the great affairs of European history, the assistant, confidant, and adviser of Metternich.
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  • As to Gentz's private life there is not much to be said.
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  • Gentz has been very aptly described as a mercenary of the pen, and assuredly no other such mercenary has ever carved out for himself a more remarkable career.
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  • Yet he never made any secret of these gifts; Metternich was aware of them, and he never suspected Gentz of writing or acting in consequence against his convictions.
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  • It is, indeed, the very impartiality and objectivity of his attitude that make the writings of Gentz such illuminating documents for the period of history which they cover.
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  • And, apart from their value as historical documents, Gentz's writings are literary monuments, classical examples of nervous and luminous German prose, or of French which is a model for diplomatic style.
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  • A selection of Gentz's works (Ausgewahlte Schriften) was published by Weick in 5 vols.
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  • Several lives of Gentz exist.
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  • Gentz acted as secretary both to him and the congress and did much of the routine work.
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  • "The king," wrote Gentz to the hospodar Caradja on the 1st of December 1814, "himself enters the houses of his first ministers, arrests them, and hands them over to their cruel enemies"; and again, on the 14th of January 1815, "The king has so debased himself that he has become no more than the leading police agent and gaoler of his country."
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  • See further the bibliographies to the articles on Metternich, Gentz, &c. For the latest developments of the " Austrian question " see Andre Cheradame, L'Europe et la question d'Autriche au seuil du XX.
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  • An attitude so indecent threatened to defeat the very objects of the reactionary powers, and Gentz congratulated the congress that these sorry protests would be buried in the archives, offering at the same time to write for the king a dignified letter in which he should express his reluctance at having to violate his oaths in the face of irresistible force !
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  • The first of these was Ober den Unsprung andCharakterdesKrieges gegen die franzosische Revolution (1801), by many regarded as Gentz's masterpiece; another important brochure, Von dem politischen Zustande von Europa vor and nach der Revolution, a criticism of Hauterive's De l'etat de la France a la fin de l'an VIII, appeared the same year.
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  • In this mission Gentz had no official mandate from the Austrian government, and whatever hopes he may have cherished of privately influencing the situation in the direction of an alliance between the two German powers were speedily dashed by the campaign of Jena.
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  • Garve (Breslau, 1857); correspondence (Briefwechsel) with Adam Muller (Stuttgart, 1857); Briefe an Pilat (2 vols., Leipzig, 1868); Aus dem Nachlass Friedrichs von Gentz (2 vols.), edited by Count Anton Prokesch-Osten (Vienna, 1867); Aus der alten Registratur der Staats-Kanzlei: Briefe politischen Inhalts von and an Friedrich von Gentz, edited by C. von Klinkowstrom (Vienna, 1870); Depeches inedites du chev.
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