Fifeshire sentence example

fifeshire
  • division of Manchester rather than retain his seat in Fifeshire, but was defeated.
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  • He sent 14,000 men into Fifeshire and marched to Perth, which he captured on the 2nd of August, thus cutting off Leslie from the north and his supplies.
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  • COWDENBEATH, a police burgh, Fifeshire, Scotland, 54 m.
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  • ALEXANDER HENDERSON (1583-1646), Scottish ecclesiastic, was born in 1583 at Criech, Fifeshire.
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  • KINGHORN, a royal and police burgh of Fifeshire, Scotland.
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  • of Great Britain and of Anne of Denmark, and was born at Falkland Castle in Fifeshire in August 1596.
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  • ELIE, a village and watering-place of Fifeshire, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth.
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  • Before the building of the Forth Bridge the customary approach to Fifeshire and the north-east of Scotland was by means of a steam ferry from Granton to Burntisland, which is still used to some extent.
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  • DYSART, a royal and police burgh and seaport of Fifeshire, Scotland, on the shore of the Firth of Forth, 2 m.
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  • During the time of the alliance between Scotland and Holland, which was closer in Fifeshire than in other counties, Dysart became known as Little Holland.
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  • Fifeshire >>
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  • ANSTRUTHER (locally pronounced Anster), a seaport of Fifeshire, Scotland.
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  • James Melville (1556-1614), nephew of the more celebrated reformer, Andrew Melville, who was minister of Kilrenny, has given in his Diary a graphic account of the arrival at Anstruther of a weatherbound ship of the Armada, and the tradition of the intermixture of Spanish and Fifeshire blood still prevails in the district.
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  • These fisher towns on the eastern and south-eastern coasts of Fifeshire furnish artists with endless subjects.
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  • DAVID LESLIE NEWARK, Lord (1601-1682), Scottish general, was born in 1601, the fifth son of Sir Patrick Leslie of Pitcairly, Fifeshire, commendator of Lindores, and Lady Jean Stuart, daughter of the 1st earl of Orkney.
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  • In 1649 he purchased the lands of Abercrombie and St Monance, Fifeshire.
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  • ABERDOUR, a village of Fifeshire, Scotland.
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  • Landing at Kinghorn in Fifeshire in August 1332, he gained a complete victory over the Scots under Donald, earl of Mar, at Dupplin Moor, took Perth, and on the 24th of September was crowned king of Scotland at Scone.
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  • ADAM SMITH (1723-1790), English economist, was the only child of Adam Smith, comptroller of the customs at Kirkcaldy in Fifeshire, Scotland, and of Margaret Douglas, daughter of Mr Douglas of Strathendry, near Leslie.
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  • CHALMERS, THOMAS (1780-1847), Scottish divine, was born at Anstruther in Fifeshire, on the 17th of March 1780.
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  • In May 1803, after attending further courses of lectures in Edinburgh, and acting as assistant to the professor of mathematics at St Andrews, he was ordained as minister of Kilmany in Fifeshire, about 9 m.
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  • Upon St Serf's, the largest, which commemorates the patron saint of Fifeshire, are the ruins of the Priory of Portmoak - so named from St Moak, the first abbot - the oldest Culdee establishment in Scotland.
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  • KIRKCALDY (locally pronounced Kerkawdi), a royal, municipal and police burgh and seaport of Fifeshire, Scotland.
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  • INVERKEITHING, a royal and police burgh of Fifeshire, Scotland.
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  • CULROSS (locally pronounced Coo-rus), a royal and police burgh, Fifeshire, Scotland, 62 m.
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  • LADYBANK, a police burgh of Fifeshire, Scotland, 51 m.
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  • Fire-clay is produced in Lanarkshire, which yields nearly half of the total output, and Ayrshire and, less extensively, in Stirlingshire, Fifeshire, Renfrewshire, Midlothian and a few other shires.
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  • Those created by charter directly from the crown were styled royal burghs: they number seventy in all, of which no fewer than seventeen belong to Fifeshire.
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  • AUCHTERMUCHTY (Gaelic, "the high ground of the wild sow"), a royal and police burgh of Fifeshire, Scotland, built on an elevation about 9 m.
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  • CRAIL (formerly Karel), a royal and police burgh of Fifeshire, Scotland, 2 M.
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  • DUNFERMLINE (Gaelic, "the fort on the crooked linn"), a royal, municipal and police burgh of Fifeshire, Scotland.
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  • CUPAR, a royal, municipal and police burgh, and capital of the county of Fifeshire, Scotland, 11 m.
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  • LOCHGELLY, a police burgh of Fifeshire, Scotland, 72 m.
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  • SIR JOHN LESLIE (1766-1832), Scottish mathematician and physicist, was born of humble parentage at Largo, Fifeshire, on the 16th of April 1766, and received his early education there and at Leven.
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  • In 1889 he was returned to parliament for West Fifeshire as a Liberal.
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