Fecamp sentence example

fecamp
  • (Pierre Roger), pope from the 7th of May 1342 to the 6th of December 1352, was born at Maumont in Limousin in 1291, the son of the wealthy lord of Rosieres, entered the Benedictine order as a boy, studied at Paris, and became successively prior of St Baudil, abbot of Fecamp, bishop of Arras, chancellor of France, archbishop of Sens and archbishop of Rouen.
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  • Fecamp, Le Poeme de Gudrun, ses origines, sa formation et son histoire (1892); F.
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  • FECAMP, a seaport and bathing resort of northern France, in the department of Seine-Inferieure, 28 m.
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  • In the time of the Confessor Winchelsea (Winchenesel, Winchelese, Wynchelse) was included in Rameslie which was granted by him to the abbey of Fecamp. The town remained under the lordship of the abbey until it was resumed by Henry III.
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  • The abbot of Fecamp seems to have originally held a market.
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  • Other works probably by Baudry are Epistola ad Fiscannenses monachos, a description of the monastery of Fecamp; Vita Roberti de Arbrissello; Vita S.
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  • He showed vigour and capacity, and recovered Fecamp and some other places in Normandy.
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  • He set sail from Shoreham on the 15th of October 1651, and landed at Fecamp in Normandy the next day.
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  • Alfred bequeathed Steyning to his nephew, but it evidently reverted to the Crown, as it was granted by Edward the Confessor to the abbot and convent of Fecamp, with whom it remained until the 15th century.
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  • In the 14th century the abbot of Fecamp held weekly markets in the borough on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and fairs at the Nativity of the Virgin and the Feast of St Michael, by prescriptive right.
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  • The story with Nicodemus as protagonist is told of the Saint-Sang relic at Fecamp; and, as stated already, a similar origin is ascribed to the Volto Santo at Lucca.
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  • Nor can there be much doubt that in this process of combination the Fecamp legend played an important role.
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  • refer to a book written at Fecamp as source for certain Perceval adventures.
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  • What this book was we do not know, but in face of the fact that certain special Fecamp relics, silver knives, appear in the Grail procession of the Parzival, it seems most probable that it was a Perceval-Grail story.
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  • Legends of the part played by Joseph of Arimathea in the conversion of Britain are closely connected with Glastonbury, the monks of which foundation showed, in the 12th century, considerable literary activity, and it seems a by no means improbable hypothesis that the present form of the Grail legend may be due to a monk of Glastonbury elaborating ideas borrowed from Fecamp. This much is certain, that between the Saint-Sang of Fecamp, the Volto Santo of Lucca, and the Grail tradition, there exists a connecting link, the precise nature of which has yet to be determined.
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  • For the Fecamp legend see Leroux de Lincey's Essai sur l'abbaye de Fescamp (1840); for the Volto Santo and kindred legends, Ernest von Dobschiitz, Christus-Bilder (Leipzig, 1899).
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  • At Coggs, in the water-meadows bordering the river immediately below Witney, a priory was attached to the Benedictine Priory of Fecamp, and of this there are Early English remains in the vicarage, while the church is mainly Decorated.
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