Farnese sentence example

farnese
  • The Madonna della Steccata (Our Lady of the Palisade), a fine church in the form of a Greek cross, erected between 1521 and 1539 after Zaccagni's designs, contains the tombs and monuments of many of the Bourbon and Farnese dukes of Parma, and preserves its pictures, Parmigiano's "Moses Breaking the Tables of the Law" and Anselmi's "Coronation of the Virgin."
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  • The Teatro Farnese, a remarkable wooden structure erected in1618-1619from Aleotti d'Argenta's designs, and capable of containing 4500 persons, is also in this palace.
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  • (Alexander Farnese) invested his son Pierluigi with the duchies of Parma and Piacenza.
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  • Antonio and Francesco both having died childless, the duchy passed to Charles of Bourbon (Don Carlos), infante of Spain, who, becoming king of Naples in 1734, surrendered Parma and Piacenza to Austria, but retained the artistic treasures of the Farnese dynasty which he had removed from Parma to Naples.
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  • But Philip had now become thoroughly alarmed, and he despatched Alexander Farnese, son of the duchess of Parma, to join his uncle Don John with a veteran force of 20,000 troops.
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  • Philip immediately appointed Alexander Farnese to the vacant post.
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  • Farnese at once set to work with subtle skill to win over to the royalist cause the Catholic nobles of the south.
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  • Alexander Ghent had fallen into the hands of John Casimir, Farnese and under his armed protection a fierce and intolerant governor= Calvinism reigned supreme in that important city.
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  • Gian Paolo Baglioni was lured to Rome in 1520 and beheaded by Leo X.; and in 1534 Rodolfo, who had slain a papal legate, was defeated by Pier Luigi Farnese, and the city, captured and plundered by his soldiery, was deprived of its privileges.
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  • In 1534 Alessandro Farnese, who owed his elevation to his sister Giulia, one of Alexander VI.s mistresses, took the tiara with the title of Paul III.
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  • much wrangling between the French and Spanish parties, the duchy was confirmed in 1586 to Ottaviano Farnese and his son Alessandro, better known as Philip II.s general, the prince of Parma.
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  • married Elisabetta Farnese, heiress to the last duke of Parma, in 1714.
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  • The duke Antonio Farnese acreS died ill 1731; the grand-duke Gian Gastone de Medici died in 737.
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  • But his very domestic regularity caused him to be entirely under the influence of his two wives, Maria Louisa of Savoy, whom he married in 1702, and who died in February 1714, and Elizabeth Farnese of Parma, whom he married in December of the same year, and who survived him.
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  • In order to dominate the Sacred College more completely he created twelve new cardinals, among them his own son Cesare, then only eighteen years old, and Alessandro Farnese, the brother of Giulia Bella, one of the pope's mistresses, creations which caused much scandal.
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  • Great jealousy of their increasing power was excited amongst the neighbouring princes, and Odoardo Farnese, duke of Parma, made war upon Taddeo, and defeated the papal troops.
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  • Her punishment is the subject of the famous group called "The Farnese Bull," by Apollonius and Tauriscus of Tralles, in the Naples museum (see Greek Art, Plate I.
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  • Lysippus worked out the finest type of sculptured Hercules, of which the Farnese by Glycon is a grand specimen.
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  • A staircase of 900 steps leads to the top. On one of the landings is a huge rudely-carved stone figure of the giant Enceladus, and at the top is an octagon building called the Riesenschloss, surmounted by a colossal copper figure of the Farnese Hercules, 31 ft.
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  • Fabio Chigi, on being made pope (Alexander VII.) in 1655, conferred the Roman patriciate on his family, and created his nephew Agostino prince of Farnese and duke of Ariccia, and the emperor Leopold I.
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  • (Alessandro Farnese), pope from 1534 to 1549, was born on the 28th of February 1468, of an old and distinguished family.
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  • But in 1549 Pier Luigi was assassinated by his outraged subjects, and the emperor thereupon claimed the two duchies for his son-in-law Ottavio Farnese, Paul's grandson.
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  • It was only with reluctance that he supported the ambitious projects of Elizabeth Farnese, queen of Spain, in Italy by guaranteeing in 1729 the succession of Don Carlos to the duchies of Parma and Tuscany.
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  • Legitimated in 1547, she was married in 1553 to Horace Farnese, second son of the duke of Parma, but her husband was killed soon afterwards at the siege of Hesdin.
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  • The harvest was reaped during the long pontificate of the Farnese pope, Paul III.
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  • 10, 1549) Under the Farnese pope art enjoyed an Indian summer.
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  • ELIZABETH FARNESE (1692-1766), queen of Spain, born on the 25th of October 1692, was the only daughter of Odoardo II., prince of Parma.
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  • See Memoires pour servir a l'histoire d'Espagne sous le regne de Philippe V, by the Marquis de St Philippe, translated by Maudave (Paris, 1756); Memoirs of Elizabeth Farnese (London, 1746); and E.
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  • Armstrong, Elizabeth Farnese, the Termagant of Spain (1892).
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  • As an adherent of the emperor he suffered in consequence of imperial reverses, and was forced to confirm Parma to Ottavio Farnese, the ally of France (1552).
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  • He studied at Bologna, Florence and Rome, and by his learning attracted the patronage of Alexander Farnese, who, as Pope Paul III., made him nuncio to Florence, where he received the honour of being elected a member of the celebrated academy, and then to Naples, where his oratorical ability brought him considerable success.
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  • The Farnese statue of Atlas in the Naples museum is well known.
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  • This had been achieved by the military skill and statesmanlike abilities of Alexander Farnese, prince of Parma, appointed governor general on the death of Don John of Austria, on the prince of 1st of October 1578.
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  • Farnese first won by promises and blandishments the confidence of the Walloons, always jealous of the predominance of the " Flemish " provinces, and then proceeded to make himself master of Brabant and Flanders by force of arms. In succession Ypres, Mechlin, Ghent, Brussels, and finally Antwerp (17th of August 1585) fell into his hands.
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  • His father's second wife, Elizabeth Farnese, was a managing woman, who had no affection except for her own children, and who looked upon her stepson as an obstacle to their fortunes.
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  • A majestic and rather severe beauty marks the conception of Hera in later art, of which the Farnese bust at Naples and the Ludovisi Hera are the most conspicuous examples.
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  • the Farnese Hercules.
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  • had failed to take, was wrested from the Farnese and annexed to the Papal States.
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  • Pomp Eio (1569-1616), a native of Corsica, who served under Alessandro Farnese and the marquis of Spinola in the Low Countries, where he lost an arm, and, from the artificial substitute which he wore, came to be known by the sobriquet Bras de Fer.
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  • The city has a number of good statues, chief among which are copies of the Farnese Hercules (Victoria Square) and of Canova's Venus (North Terrace), statues of Queen Victoria and Robert Burns, Sir Thomas Elder's statue at the university, and a memorial (1905) over the grave of Colonel Light, founder of the colony, in Light Square.
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  • The huge Farnese palace was begun after Vignola's designs by Margaret of Austria in 1558, but it was never completed, and since 1800 it has been used as barracks.
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  • Having been occupied by the papal forces in 1512, it was in 1545 united with Parma (q.v.) to form an hereditary duchy for Pierluigi Farnese, son of Paul III.
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  • The medieval castle of Isola Farnese, on a hill to the south of the city,' is first mentioned in a document of A.D.
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  • In1474-1475Charles the Bold of Burgundy besieged the town in vain for eleven months, during which he lost io,000 men; but it was taken and sacked by Alexander Farnese in 1586.
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  • with Elizabeth Farnese of Parma.
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  • proclaimed it his private property independently of the crown, placed in it the Farnese collection which he had inherited from his father, and all the specimens from Herculaneum, Pompeii, Stabiae, Puteoli, Paestum, &c., which till then had been housed in the palace at Portici, and gave it the name of Real Museo Borbonico.
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  • The large bronzes are almost the only ones which have survived from classical times, the most famous of them being the seated Mercury and the dancing Faun; the marbles reckon among their vast number the Psyche, the Capuan Venus, the portraits of Homer and Julius Caesar, as well as the huge group called the Toro Farnese (Amphion and Zethus tying Dirce to its horns), the Farnese Hercules, the excellent though late statues of the Balbi on horseback and a very fine collection of ancient portrait busts.
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  • FARNESE, the name of one of the most illustrious and powerful Italian families, which besides including eminent prelates, statesmen and warriors among its members, ruled the duchy of Parma for two centuries.
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  • The early history of the family is involved in obscurity, but they are first heard of as lords of Farneto or Farnese, a castle near the lake of Bolsena, and they played an important part as consuls and signori of Orvieto.
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  • One Pietro Farnese commanded the papal armies under Paschal II.
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  • Ranuccio Farnese served Eugene IV.
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  • so well that the pope endowed him with large fiefs, and is reported to have said, "The Church is ours because Farnese has given it back to us."
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  • The family derived further advantages at the time of Pope Alexander VI., who was the lover of the beautiful Giulia Farnese, known as Giulia Bella, and created her brother Alessandro a cardinal (1493).
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  • Of these the most famous was Pierluigi Farnese (1503-1547), who served in the papal army in various compaigns, but also took part in the sack of Rome in 1527.
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  • Della Casa, Bembo, Vasari, &c. It was he who completed the magnificent Farnese palace in Rome.
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  • Julius, who was anxious to be on good terms with Charles on account of the council of Trent which was then sitting, ordered Farnese to hand Parma over to the papal authorities once more, and on his refusal hurled censures and admonitions at his head, and deprived him of his Roman fiefs, while Charles did the same with regard to those in Lombardy.
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  • At his death in 1586 he was succeeded by his son Alessandro Farnese (1545-1592), the famous general of Philip II.
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  • of Spain by Elisabetta Farnese (1692-1766), granddaughter of Ranuccio II.
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  • Antonio died in 1731, and with him the line of Farnese came to an end.
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  • Alexander Farnese >>
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  • In concert with her he arranged the king's marriage with Elizabeth Farnese of Parma.
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  • ALEXANDER FARNESE (1545-1592), duke of Parma, general, statesman and diplomatist, governor-general of the Netherlands under Philip II.
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  • He was the son of Ottavio Farnese, duke of Parma, and Margaret of Austria, natural daughter of Charles V.
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  • In the meantime the provinces of the Netherlands had revolted against the arbitrary and oppressive Spanish rule, and Don John of Austria, who had been sent as governorgeneral to restore order, had found himself helpless in face of the superior talent and personal influence of the prince of Orange, who had succeeded in uniting all the provinces in common resistance to the civil and religious tyranny of Philip. In the autumn of 1577 Farnese was sent to join Don John at the head of reinforcements, and it was mainly his prompt decision at a critical moment that won the battle of Gemblours (1578).
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  • Shortly afterwards Don John, whose health had broken down through disappointment and ill-health, died, and Farnese was appointed to take his place.
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  • Farnese, as soon as he had obtained a secure basis of operations in Hainaut and Artois, set himself in earnest to the task of reconquering Brabant and Flanders by force of arms. Town after town fell into his power.
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  • The siege began in 1584 and called forth all the resources of Farnese's military genius.
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  • With the fall of Antwerp, for Malines and Brussels were already in the hands of Farnese, the whole of the southern Netherlands was brought once more to recognize the authority of Philip. But Holland and Zeeland, whose geographical position made them unassailable except by water, were by the courage and skill of their hardy seafaring population, with the help of English auxiliaries sent by Queen Elizabeth, able to defy his further advance.
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  • In 1586 Alexander Farnese became duke of Parma by the death of his father.
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  • Farnese could get no regular supplies of money from the king for the payment of the soldiery, and he had to pledge his own jewels to meet the demand.
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  • P. Gachard, Correspondance d'Alexandre Farnese, Prince de Parme, gouverneur general des Pays-Bas, avec Philippe II, 15781 579 (Brussels, 1850); Fra Pietro, Alessandro Farnese, duca di Parma (Rome, 1836).
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  • Elizabeth Farnese >>
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  • He succeeded in this by playing very adroitly on the ambition of Elizabeth Farnese and her husband Philip V., who was to reign in France notwithstanding any renunciation that might have taken place.
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  • On the death of Philip V.s first wife Maria Louisa Gabriella of Savoy, in 1714, the king was married at once to Elizabeth Farnese of Parma, who expelled Mrne des Ursins, obtained complete control over her husband, and used her whole influence to Elizabeth drag Spain into a series of adventures in order to Farneseand obtain Italian dominions for her sons.
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  • by his second marriage with Elizabeth Farnese.
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  • The Hercules Farnese of Naples, though signed by Glycon of Athens, and a later and exaggerated transcript, owes something, including the motive of rest after Jabour, to Lysippus.
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  • There were eight dukes of Parma of the Farnese line - Pierluigi (d.
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  • Her place in his affections was filled by the beautiful Giulia Farnese (Giulia Bella), wife of an Orsini, but his love for his children by Vannozza remained as strong as ever and proved, indeed, the determining factor of his whole career.
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  • To the liaison between his sister Giulia Farnese Orsini and Alexander VI.
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  • He began the famous Farnese Palace; constructed the Sala Regia in the Vatican; commissioned Michelangelo to paint the "Last Judgment," and to resume, work upon St Peter's; and otherwise adorned the city.
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  • Many of their fiefs he seized for himself, and he was implicated in the murder of Pier Luigi Farnese, duke of Parma (see Farnese), who had helped Fiesco.
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  • The Palazzo Farnese in Rome, one of the finest specimens of Roman Renaissance architecture, was begun under Paul III., while he was cardinal, by Antonio da San Gallo, and completed by his nephew Cardinal Alessandro under the direction of Michelangelo (1526).
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  • Alexander Farnese had been brought up in Spain with his cousin, the ill-fated Don Carlos, and his uncle Don John of Austria, both of whom were about the same age as himself, and after his marriage he took up his residence at once at the court of Madrid.
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  • The dream of Cardinal Alberoni, Philip V.s minister, was to set fire to all this inflammable material in order to snatch therefrom a crown of som~ sort to satisfy the maternal greed of Elizabeth Farnese; and this he might have attained by the occupation of Sardinia and the expedition to Sicily (1717-1718), if Dubois, a priest without a religion, a greedy parvenu and a diplomatist of second rank, though tenacious and full of resources as a minister, had not placed his common sense at the disposal of the regents interests and those of European peace.
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