Farnell sentence example

farnell
  • Farnell refers to the ancient association between the healing craft and the singing of spells, and says that it is impossible to decide which is the original sense.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States.
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  • Farnell, The Evolution of Religion, p. 202 seq.).
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  • Farnell, The Evolution of Religion, lest.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, ii.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, especially i.
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  • Farnell (Cults of the Greek States, iii.
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  • 217, 222; but see Farnell, Cults, iii.
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  • Both pampa and iptvis, according to Farnell, are epithets of Demeter as an earth-goddess of the under-world.
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  • According to Farnell, the meaning of the epithet is to be looked for in the original conception of Erinys, which was that of an earth-goddess akin to Ge, thus naturally associated with Demeter, rather than that of a wrathful avenging deity.
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  • Various interpretations have been given of the horse-headed form of the Black Demeter: (I) that the horse was one of the forms of the corn-spirit in ancient Greece; (2) that it was an animal " devoted " to the chthonian goddess; (3) that it is totemistic; (4) that the form was adopted from Poseidon Hippios, who is frequently associated with the earth-goddess and is said to have received the name Hippios first at Thelpusa, in order that Demeter might figure as the mother of Areion (for a discussion of the whole subject see Farnell, Cults, iii.
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  • Although the offerings at the festival were bloodless, the ceremony of the presentation of the airapxai was probably accompanied by animal sacrifice (Farnell, Foucart); Mommsen, however, considers the offerings to have been pastry imitations.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, iii.
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  • The thought that is most intensely present with the mystic is that ' Farnell, Cults, iii.
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  • The church of the parish of Farnell, 3z m.
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  • Between Farnell and Brechin lies Kinnaird Castle, the seat of the earl of Southesk.
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  • According to Roscher, the manner of her birth represents the storm-cloud split by lightning; Farnell (Cults of the Greek States, i.
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  • As in the case of Aphrodite and Apollo, Roscher in his Lexikon deduces all the characteristics of Athena from a single conception - that of the goddess of the storm or the thunder-cloud (for a discussion of such attempts see Farnell, Cults, i.
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  • Farnell, The Cults of the Greek States, i.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, iv.
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  • Farnell, The Evolution of Religion (London, 1905); Jacob Grimm, Teutonic Mythology, translation by J.
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  • grecques et rom.; Farnell, Cults v.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, v.
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  • Farnell, The Evolution of Religion (London, 1905); J.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States (1907), iv.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States; also article Athena and works quoted.
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  • There is nothing in the Samian iepos yapos to suggest a marriage of heaven and earth, or of two vegetation-spirits; as Dr Farnell points out, the ritual appears to explain the custom of human nuptials.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, i.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States (1907), vol.
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  • Farnell in The Year's Work in Classical Studies, 1907).
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  • Sikes (1904); Farnell, Cults, the Greek States, v.
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  • Farnell, The Evoliition of Religion (1905), follows similar lines.
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  • Farnell, Cults of Greece, iii.
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  • 8 Farnell, however, supposes that Ge acquired the cult-appellative through her prophetic character (Cults of the Greek States, iii.
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  • Vide Farnell, op. cit.
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  • pp. 1100-1121; Farnell's Cults of the Greek States, vol.
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  • According to the generally accepted view, she is of Hellenic origin, but Farnell regards her as a foreign importation from Thrace, the home of Bendis, with whom Hecate has many points in common.
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  • Alone of the gods besides Helios, she witnessed the abduction of Persephone, and, torch in hand (a natural symbol for the moon's, light, but see Farnell), assisted Demeter in her search for her daughter.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, ii., where this view is examined; P. Paris in Daremberg and Saglio's Dictionnaire des antiquites; O.
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  • This view is examined in detail and rejected by Farnell (Cults, ii.
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  • Her character as a goddess of vegetation is clearly shown in the cult and ritual of Adonis (q.v.; also Farnell, ii.
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  • It is pointed out by Farnell that this cult of Aphrodite, as the patroness of married life, is probably a native development of the Greek religion, the oriental legends representing her by no means as an upholder of the purer relations of man and woman.
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  • Worner, article " Aineias " in Roscher's Lexikon, and Farnell, ii.
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  • (For the legend of Theseus and Aphrodite E7rcrpayia, " on the goat," see Farnell, Cults, ii.
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  • See Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, v.
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  • He is the god of agriculture, specially connected with Aristaeus, which, originally a mere epithet, became an independent personality (see, however, Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, iv.
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  • Carneius (probably "horned") is considered by some to be a pre-Dorian god of cattle, also connected with harvest operations, whose cult was grafted on to that of Apollo; by others, to have been originally an epithet of Apollo, afterwards detached as a separate personality (Farnell, Cults, iv.
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  • The consecration of the wolf to Apollo is probably the relic of an ancient totemistic religion (Farnell, Cults, i.
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  • (On the Delphian cult of Apollo and its political significance, see Amphictyony, Delphi, Oracle; and Farnell, Cults, iv.
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  • whether Paean (or Paeon) was originally an epithet of Apollo, subsequently developed into an independent personality, or an independent deity merged in the later arrival (Farnell, Cults, iv.
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  • As Agyieus (" god of streets and ways"), in the form of a stone pillar with painted head, placed before the doors of houses, he let in the good and kept out the evil (see Farnell, Cults, iv.
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  • Apollo-Helios must be regarded as "a late by-product of Greek religion" (Farnell, Cults, iv.
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  • This would point to the fact that certain settlements of Apolline worship along the northernmost border of Greece (Illyria, Thrace, Macedonia) were in the habit of sending offerings to the god to a centre of his worship farther south (probably Delphi), advancing by the route from Tempe through Thessaly, Pherae and Doris to Delphi; while others adopted the route through Illyria, Epirus, Dodona, the Malian gulf, Carystus in Euboea, and Tenos to Delos (Farnell, Cults, iv.
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  • Two curious epithets in this connexion deserve notice: Xvy03Eo a ("bound with withies"), derived from the legend that the image of Artemis Orthia was found in a thicket of withies, which twined round it and kept it upright (Xi yos is the agnus castus, and points to Artemis in her relation to women); and Cura-yxop. vr 7 ("the suspended"), probably a reference to the custom of hanging the mask or image of a vegetation-divinity on a tree to obtain fertility (Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, ii.
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  • It has been observed that she is rather the patroness of the wild beasts of the field than of the more agricultural or domestic animals (Farnell, Cults, ii.
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  • Lang, Myth, Ritual and Religion, ii.; Farnell, Cults, ii.
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  • The custom of flogging youths at the altar of Artemis Orthia 1 at Limnaeum in Laconia, and the legend of Iphigeneia, herself another form of Artemis, connected with Artemis Taurica of the Tauric Chersonese, are usually supposed to point to early human sacrifice (but see Farnell).
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  • The idea of Artemis '.s a virgin goddess, the "queen and huntress, chaste and fair," which obtained great prominence in early times, and seems inconsistent with her association with childbirth, is generally explained as due to her connexion with Apollo, but it is suggested by Farnell that irapOE'os originally meant "unmarried," and that "Apreµcs 7r-ap9Evos may have been originally the goddess of a people who had not yet the advanced Hellenic institutions of settled marriage.
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  • Farnell, The Cults of the Greek States, ii.
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  • Farnell, Cults of the Greek States; Miss Jane Harrison, Prolegomena to Greek Religion; and Frazer, The Golden Bough, especially as regards the vegetable or " probably arboreal ".aspect of Zeus.
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  • See also Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, i.
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  • Farnell (Cults, p. 275) points out that at the same time she is certainly looked upon as in some way connected with the health-divinities, since in her temple she is grouped with Asclepius and Hygieia (see Hygieia).
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  • The epithet rrpovoia (" forethought") is due, according to Farnell, to a confusion with irpovaLa, referring to a statue of the goddess standing "before a shrine," and arose later (probably spreading from Delphi), some time after the Persian wars, in which she repelled a Persian attack on the temples "by divine forethought"; another legend attributes the name to her skill in assisting Leto at the birth of Apollo and Artemis.
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  • Dr Farnell, however, holds that Erechtheus and Poseidon were originally independent figures, and that both Erechtheus and Athena were prior to Poseidon, As he gave, so he could withhold, springs of water; thus the waterless neighbourhood of Argos was supposed to be the result of his anger.
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  • Various explanations of the title ` '17r7rcos have been given: (1) that the horse represented the corn-spirit; (2) the resemblance of the crested waves to horses; (3) the impression of horses' hoofs near the god's sacred springs, and the shaking of the earth by them when galloping (see Farnell, Cults of the Greek States, iv.
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  • Farnell, who regards Artemis as originally an earth-goddess, while recognizing a "genuine lunar element" in Hecate from the 5th century, considers her a chthonian rather than a lunar divinity (see also Warr in Classical Review, ix.
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