Epistolae sentence examples

  • et aliorum epistolae," in S.

  • Grynaei epistolae (1847).

  • Boissonade chiefly devoted his attention to later Greek literature: Philostratus, Heroica (1806) and Epistolae (1842); Marinus, Vita procli (1814); Tiberius Rhetor, De Figuris (1815); Nicetas Eugenianus, Drosilla et Charicles (1819); Herodian, Partitiones (1819); Aristaenetus, Epistolae (1822); Eunapius, Vitae Sophisiarum (1822); Babrius, Fables (1844); Tzetzes, Allegoriae Iliados (1851); and a Collection of Greek Poets in 24 vols.

  • Palearii Verulani Opera), including four books of Epistolae and twelve Orationes besides the De immortalitate, was published at Lyons in 1552; this was followed by two others, at Basel, and several after his death, the fullest being that of Amsterdam, 1696.

  • For the Tatar invasion see the contemporary Rogerius, Epistolae super destructione Regni Hungariae per Tartaros facta (Budapest, 1885).

  • See "Epistolae Coelestini III.

  • Pauli Epistolae xiv.

  • The opening words of the Philobiblon and the Epistolae as given by Bale represent those of the Philobiblon and its prologue, so that he apparently made two books out of one treatise.

  • We have above all his Letters (Epistolae), difficult to date, but extremely important from the standpoint of history, dogma, or literature; see Dummler's edition in the Monumenta Germaniae historica, 1892.

  • allocutions, epistolae, &c. (Bruges and Lille, 1887, &c.); the encyclicals (Sdmtliche Rundschreiben) with a German translation (6 vols., Freiburg, 1878-1904); Discorsi del Sommo Pontefice Leone XIII.

  • epp. 2 and 61; Ambrose, De fide, prolegomena to Epistolae II, 17, 21, Consolatio de obitu Valentiniani; H.

  • During this period he published his poetical satire called Metamorphosis (1726), his Epistolae ad virum perillustrem (1727), his Description of Denmark and Norway (1729), History of Denmark, Universal Church History, Biographies of Famous Men, Moral Reflections, Description of Bergen (1737), A History of the Jews, and other learned and laborious compilations.

  • epistolae interpretatio historicoexegetica (Bremen, 1844); and H.

  • C. Klotzsch, De occasione et indole epistolae ad Philem.

  • Mansel, and in 1618 James Howell, author of Epistolae Ho-elianae, was acting as steward.

  • de locis quibusdam epistolae ad Phil., 1844).

  • His Epistolae were published at Leiden in 1647, and a French translation at Paris in 1668-1670.

  • The extant writings of Paulinus consist of some fifty Epistolae, addressed to Sulpicius Severus, Delphinus, Augustine, Jerome and others; thirty-two Carmina in a great variety of metre, including a series of hexameter "natales," begun about 393 and continued annually in honour of the festival of St Felix, metrical epistles to Ausonius and Gestidius, and paraphrases of three psalms; and a Passio S.

  • His correspondence (Epistolae ad diversos, ed.

  • One hundred and eight letters to Camerarius were published at Groningen in 1646 under the title Langueti Epistolae ad Joach.

  • Theodorici epistolae et verba mystica.

  • His most important original works are: Les Vies des poetes Grecs (1665); Methode pour commencer les humanites Grecques et Latines (2nd ed., 1731), of which several English adaptations have appeared; Epistolae Criticae (1659).

  • See "Epistolae et Privilegia," in J.

  • These Epistolae have been translated into French by E.

  • Johann Reuchlin, a well-known scholar, who had been charged by the Dominicans with heresy, not only received the support of the newer type of scholars, who wrote him encouraging letters which he published under the title Epistolae clarorum virorum, but this collection suggested to Crotus Rubianus and Ulrich von Hutten one of the most successful satires of the ages, the Epistolae obscurorum virorum.

  • His extant works are - (i) a speech before Arcadius, De regno; (2) Dio, sive de suo ipsius instituto, in which he signifies his purpose to devote himself to true philosophy; (3) Encomium calvitii (he was himself bald), a literary jeu d'esprit, suggested by Dio Chrysostom's Praise of Hair; (4) De providentia, in two books; (5) De insomniis; (6) 157 Epistolae; (7) 12 Hymni, of a contemplative, Neoplatonic character; and several homilies and occasional speeches.

  • The Epistolae, which for the modern reader greatly exceed his other works in interest, have been edited by Demetriades (Vienna, 1792) and by Glukus (Venice, 1812), the Calvitii encomium by Krabinger (Stuttgart, 1834), the De providentia by Krabinger (Sulzbach, 1835), the De regno by Krabinger (Munich, 1825), and the Hymns by Flach (Tubingen, 1875).

  • Other works by Einhard are: Epistolae, which are of considerable importance for the history of the times; Historia translations beatorum Christi martyrum Marcellini et Petri, which gives a curious account of how the bones of these martyrs were stolen and conveyed to Seligenstadt, and what miracles they wrought; and De adoranda truce, a treatise which has only recently come to light, and which has been published by E.

  • Soon afterwards he was invited to England, and is said to have acted as tutor to the princess Mary, for whose use he wrote De ratione studii puerilis epistolae duae (1523).

  • 20; compare also Pliny, Epistolae and Panegyricus; Tillemont, Histoire des empereurs remains, ii.; C. Merivale, History of the Romans under the Empire, ch.

  • For the life of Gregory IX., consult his Letters in Monumenta Germaniae historica, Epistolae saeculi XIII.

  • During this period he carried on a correspondence with Cicero, whose letters to him form the third book of the Epistolae ad Familiares.

  • epistolae ineditae, edited by B.

  • This work is entitled Epistolae historicofamiliares.

  • His editorial labours included the publication of various works of his predecessors, and of Epistolae ecclesiasticae praestantium ac eruditorum virorum (Amsterdam, 1684), chiefly by Jakobus Arminius, Joannes Uytenbogardus, Konrad Vorstius (1569-1622), Gerhard Vossius (1577-1649), Hugo Grotius, Simon Episcopius (his grand-uncle) and Gaspar Barlaeus; they are of great value for the history of Arminianism.

  • Hesiod, Theogony, 214; Lucian, Hermotimus, 20, and especially Deorum Concilium; Philostratus, Epistolae, 37.

  • The Delphic oracle at last declared the cause of her illnesses to be the wrath of the offended goddess; whereupon her father consented to her marriage with Acontius (Aristaenetus, Epistolae, i.

  • scilicet constitutiones, bullae, litterae apostolicae, epistolae, vols.

  • If we must admit the correctness of the date of Ep. 1 4 in the collection of Erasmus's Epistolae, we should have to assume that their acquaintance had begun as early as 1497.

  • - Ammanati, Epistolae et commentarii (1506); Gaspar Veronensis, Vita, ap. Marini, Archiatri ii.

  • 1 He wrote also Blot /ocftorcov (Lives of the Sophists), Gymnasticus 'and Epistolae (mainly of an erotic character).

  • Shirley (Rolls Series, 2 vols., 1862-1866); the Close and Patent Rolls edited for the Record Commission and the Master of the Rolls; the Epistolae Roberti Grosseteste (ed.

  • Soon afterwards he went to Saumur, where in 1679 were published Liberii de Sancto Amore Epistolae Theologicae (Irenopoli: Typis Philalethianis), usually attributed to him; they deal with the doctrine of the Trinity, the hypostatic union of the two natures in Jesus Christ, original sin, and the like, in a manner sufficiently far removed from that of the conventional orthodoxy of the period.

  • His Ars Critica appeared in 1696, and, in continuation, Epistolae Criticae et Ecclesiasticae in 1700.

  • On Marsh's relations with Grosseteste, see Roberti Grosseteste epistolae, ed.

  • His letters were printed first in a selection, Epistolae ad Gallos (12mo, Leiden, 1648), abounding, though an Elzevir, in errors of the press.

  • Grotii epistolae quotquot reperiri potuerunt (fol., Amsterdam, 1687).

  • A few may be found scattered in other collections of Epistolae.

  • The Epistolae, however, have been published separately by P. Ewald and L.

  • One of his contemporaries was Edward Lee (c. 1482-1544) arch the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, bishop of York, famous for his attack on Erasmus, who replied to Cold Harbor and the long siege of Petersburg, in which, him in his Epistolae aliquot eruditorum virorum.

  • Only two of his works have been printed, his Erotemata (published at Venice in 1484), which was the first Greek grammar in use in the West, and Epistolae III.

  • The work was divided into five sections: Scriptores, Leges, Diplomata, Epistolae and Antiquitates, but it was many years before anything was done with regard to the two last-named sections.

  • Work was also begun upon the Antiquates and the Epistolae.

  • The sections cf the former are Potae Latini mcdii aevi, Libri confraternitatum and Necrologia Gertnaniae, and of the latter Epistolae saeculi XIII.

  • Benedicti, which, along with his Epistolae, are in J.

  • are now lost, except that containing the Epistolae ad Familiares, a MS. written in the 9th century and now at Florence (Laur.

  • Epistolae, vols.

  • The chief sources for Pole's biography are his life written in Italian by his secretary Beccatelli, which was translated into Latin by Andrew Dudith as Vita Poli cardinalis (Venice, 1563), and his letters (Epistolae Reginaldi Poli) edited by Girolamo Quirini and published in 5 volumes (Brescia, 1744-1757), a new edition of which is in preparation at Rome with additions from the Vatican Archives.

  • Camdenum Epistolae.

  • The ten books of Symmachus' Epistolae, so highly esteemed in the cultured circles of the 4th century, may be contrasted with the less elegant but more forceful epistles of Jerome.

  • From Petrarch to the Epistolae obscurorum virorum there is a whole epistolary literature.

  • The Epistolae obscurorum virorum have to some extent a counterpart in the Epistles of Martin Marprelate.

  • His most important extant works are: in prose, Gratiarum Actio, an address of thanks to Gratian for his elevation to the consulship; Periochae, summaries of the books of the Iliad and Odyssey; and one or two epistolae; in verse, Epigrammata, including several free translations from the Greek Anthology; Ephemeris, the occupations of a day; Parentalia and Commemoratio Professorum Burdigalensium, on deceased relatives and literary friends; Epitaphia, chiefly on the Trojan heroes; Caesares, memorial verses on the Roman emperors from Julius Caesar to Elagabalus; Ordo Nobilium Urbium, short poems on famous cities; Ludus Septem Sapientum, speeches delivered by the Seven Sages of Greece; Idyllia, of which the best-known are the Mosella, a descriptive poem on the Moselle, and the infamous Cento Nuptialis.

  • We may also mention Cupido Cruciatus, Cupid on the cross; Technopaegion, a literary trifle consisting of a collection of verses ending in monosyllables; Eclogarum Liber, on astronomical and astrological subjects; Epistolae, including letters to Paulinus and Symmachus; lastly, Praefatiunculae, three poetical epistles, one to the emperor Theodosius.

  • Baumgarten-Crusius, who in 1845 also issued an edition of Fabricius's Epistolae ad W.

  • In this connexion it might also be well to mention the remarkable satires on the papal court, included in the Epistolae sine titulo.

  • The Epistolae Familiares, a very incomplete collection of letters, was published by J.

  • Leeuwenhoek, Epistolae ad Societatem regiam Anglicam (1719); E.

  • Diimmler has also published an authoritative edition, Epistolae aevi Carolini, vol.

  • His other works include Juvenilia et poemata varia, orationes and epistolae.

  • See the Epistolae Roberti Grosseteste (Rolls Series, 1861) edited with a valuable introduction by H.

  • Among his works, which were first collectively published in 1867-1876, are Absolutissimus de octo orationis partium constructione libellus (Antwerp, 1530), Rudimenta Grammatices (London, 1539), Daily Devotions, Monition to a Godly Life, Epistolae ad Erasmum, and commentaries on different parts of the Bible.

  • Winkelmann (Innsbruck, 1880); Epistolae saeculi XIII.

  • His Diplomata, epistolae, decreta are in Migne, Patrolog.

  • After the appeal of the inquisitor-general, Hochstraten, and the appearance of the Epistolae obscurorum virorum, however, Leo annulled the decision (June 1520) and imposed silence on Reuchlin.

  • That the passion which she inspired in him was tender, pure and fitted to raise to a higher level a nature which in some 1 The Journal for 1755 records that during that year, besides writing and translating a great deal in Latin and French, he had read, amongst other works, Cicero's Epistolae ad familiares, his Brutus, all his Orations, his dialogues De amicitia and De senectute, Terence (twice), and Pliny's Epistles.

  • Altertums (2 vols., 3rd ed., 1893); his Epistolae were published by Cannato (Florence, 1 759) with a life by Mehus; Bollandist Bibl.

  • John Bale 1 and Pits 2 mention other works of his, Epistolae Familiares and Orationes ad Principes.

  • The De Ecclesia was published by Ulrich von Hutten in 1520; other controversial writings by Otto Brumfels in 1524; and Luther wrote an interesting preface to Epistolae Quaedam, which were published in 1537.

  • Apokalyptik (1857); Novum Testamentum extra canonem receptum (4 parts, 1866; 2nd ed., 1876-1884); Histor.-kritische Einleitung in das Neue Testament (1875); Acta Apostolorum graece et latine secundum antiquissimos testes (1899); the first complete edition of the Shepherd of Hermas (1887); Ignatii et Polycarpi epistolae (1902).

  • DECRETALS (Epistolae decretales), the name (see Decree above), which is given in Canon Law to those letters of the pope which formulate decisions in ecclesiastical law; they are generally given in answer to consultations, but are sometimes due to the initiative of the popes.

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