Empiricus sentence example

empiricus
  • SEXTUS EMPIRICUS (2nd and 3rd centuries A.D.), physician and philosopher, lived at Alexandria and at Athens.
    0
    0
  • See Brochard, Les Sceptiques grecs (1887); Pappenheirn, Lebens- .verhaltnisse des Sextus Empiricus (Berlin, 1875); Jourdain, Sextus Empiricus (Paris, 1858); Patrick, Sextus Empiricus and the Greek Sceptics (1899, with trans.
    0
    0
  • Little else was produced in these times but compilations, of the most meagre kind, chiefly of the nature of herbals, or domestic receiptbooks; among the authors of which it may be sufficient to name Serenus Sammonicus (3rd century), Gargilius Martialis (3rd century) and Marcellus Empiricus (5th century).
    0
    0
  • For the immediate successors of Aenesidemus see Agrippa, Sextus Empiricus.
    0
    0
  • Marcellus's third type of dogma is ' Sextus Empiricus (c. A.D.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In Rome he lectured on rhetoric and philosophy, and collected around him many eminent pupils, amongst whom Cicero was the most famous and the most enthusiastic. None of his works is extant; our knowledge of his views is derived from Numenius, Sextus Empiricus and Cicero.
    0
    0
  • 43), who studied under him at Athens, and Sextus Empiricus (Pyrrh.
    0
    0
  • Fabricius in the production of his Bibliotheca Graeca and his edition of Sextus Empiricus.
    0
    0
  • 28; Sextus Empiricus, Adv.
    0
    0
  • The work has no pretensions to style, and contains many colloquialisms. The greater part of it was transferred without acknowledgment to the work of Marcellus Empiricus (c. 410), De Medicamentis Empiricis, Physicis, et Rationabilibus, which is of great value for the correction of the text of Largus.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Similarly, Gorgias, in a work On Nature, or on the Nonent, maintained" (a) that nothing is, (b) that, if anything is, it cannot be known, (c) that, if anything is and can be known, it cannot be expressed in speech; and the summaries which have been preserved by Sextus Empiricus (Adv.
    0
    0
  • From the time of Pyrrho overlapping Aristotle himself, who seems to have been well content to use the feints of more than one school among his predecessors, while showing that none of them could claim to get past his guard, down through a period in which the decadent academy under Carneades, otherwise dogmatic in its negations, supplied new thrusts and parries, to Aenesidemus in the late Ciceronian age, and again to Sextus Empiricus, there seems to have been something of plasticity and continuous progress.
    0
    0
  • The cause of eclecticism is the unsatisfying character of the creeds of such science, in conjunction with the familiar law that, in triangular or plusquamtriangular controversies a common hatred will produce an alliance 4 Sextus Empiricus, Pyrrhon.
    0
    0
  • 1139b 27) and Sextus Empiricus, Pyrr.
    0
    0
  • But this, though apparently supported by Sextus Empiricus (Adv.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • C. Valeton, 1876), the substance of which may be gathered from the writings of Sextus Empiricus, and also from the treatise (ascribed to Theophrastus) De Melisso, Xenophane, Gorgia.
    0
    0
  • Parmenides embodied his tenets in a short poem, called Nature, of which fragments, amounting in all to about 160 lines, have been preserved in the writings of Sextus Empiricus, Simplicius and others.
    0
    0
  • To him are ascribed the five tropes (pente tropoi) which, according to Sextus Empiricus, summarize the attitude of the later ancient sceptics.
    0
    0
  • Aristarchus of Samos, Martianus Capella (the precursor of Copernicus), Cicero, Favorinus, Sextus Empiricus, Juvenal, and in a later age Savonarola and Pico della Mirandola, and La Fontaine, a contemporary of the neutral La Bruyere, were all pronounced opponents of astrology.
    0
    0
  • Having reached this conclusion, he was able to assimilate the physical theory of Heraclitus, as is explained in the Hypotyposes of Sextus Empiricus.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It seems also true that the Academics were less overborne than the Pyrrhonists by the practical issue of their doubts (imperturbability); their interest was more purely intellectual, and they had something of the old delight in mental exercitation for its own sake (see Arcesilaus, Carneades, Aenesidemus, Agrippa and Sextus Empiricus).
    0
    0
  • Of more or less isolated thinkers may be mentioned Francois de la Mothe le Vayer (1588-1672), whose Cinq Dialogues appeared after his death under the pseudonym of Orosius Tubero; Samuel Sorbiere (1615-1670), who translated the Hypotyposes Pyrrhoneae of Sextus Empiricus; Simon Foucher (1644-1696), canon of Dijon, who wrote a History of the Academics, and combated Descartes and Malebranche from a sceptical standpoint.
    0
    0
  • According to Sextus Empiricus, he was the founder of the Fourth Academy, but other writers refuse to admit the separate existence of more than three academies (see Academy, Greek).
    0
    0