Eighteenth-century sentence example

  • Eighteenth-century Italy looked on religion with apathetic indifference, and Liguori convinced himself that only the gentlest and most lenient treatment could win back the alienated laity; hence he was always willing to excuse errors on the side of laxity as due to an excess of zeal in winning over penitents.
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  • Hating as he did feudal class institutions and Tudor-Stuart traditions of arbitrary rule, 2 his attitude can be imagined toward Hamilton's oft-avowed partialities - and Jefferson assumed, his intrigues - for British class-government with its eighteenth-century measure of corruption.
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  • Parnell's and Edward Saunderson's shared penchant for "eighteenth-century modes of thought and expression," is another example.
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  • Newtonian atomism was not fruitful as far as eighteenth-century experimental science is concerned.
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  • Wishing to erase and repudiate obscurity (and hence implicitly admitting its efficacy) points out a sublime contradiction of the late eighteenth-century enlightenment.
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  • He is currently completing a book on eighteenth-century historiography, public memory and politics for Edinburgh University Press.
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  • Like most Continental eighteenth-century harpsichords made north of the Alps, this instrument was originally made with a painted soundboard.
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  • I know of no eighteenth-century English spinets with soundboard paintings.
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  • We may find determinate modes of interpretation in the eighteenth-century variorum, if we are not distracted by our modern predisposition to indeterminacy.
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  • There's a small selection of Burns's poetry translated into English for those who find themselves defeated by eighteenth-century Scottish vernacular.
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  • He presents a succession of many scenes, exquisitely wrought, of Johnson amid widely various settings of Eighteenth-Century England.
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  • There 's a small selection of Burns 's poetry translated into English for those who find themselves defeated by eighteenth-century Scottish vernacular.
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  • In fact, its name comes from the Italian word for "influence," because people in eighteenth-century Europe thought that the disease was caused by the influence of bad weather.
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