Edin sentence example

edin
  • Soc. Edin.
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  • Stokes (Edin.
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  • 518, also " Organization of Sponge," Edin.
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  • The alluvial plain of Babylonia was called Edin, the Eden of Gen.
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  • When the Semites first entered the Edin or plain of Babylonia is uncertain, but it must have been at a remote period.
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  • The name was first given by Sir John Herschel to an apparatus for measuring the heating effect of solar rays (Edin.
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  • Besides the invention of the prism known by his name ("A method of increasing the divergence of the two rays in calcareous spar, so as to produce a single image," New Edin.
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  • Edin.
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  • Maine as a Jurist," Edin.
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  • Black (Edin.
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  • Steggall in the Proc. Edin.
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  • Elliot, "On the Farinaceous Grains and the various kinds of Pulses used in Southern India," Edin.
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  • Edin; see especially Winckler's discussion in Or.
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  • Abbott, Principles of Bacteriology (7th ed., London, 1905); Crookshank, Bacteriology and Infective Diseases (with bibliography, 4th ed., London, 1896); Duclaux, Traite de microbiologie (Paris, 1899-1900); Eyre, Bacteriological Technique (Philadelphia and London, 1902); Flugge, Die Mikroorganismen (3rd ed., Leipzig, 1896); Fischer, Vorlesungen fiber Bakterien (2nd ed., Jena, 1902); Gunther, Einfiihrung in das Studium der Bakteriologie (6th ed., Leipzig, 1906); Hewlett, Manual of Bacteriology (2nd ed., London, 1902); Hueppe, Principles of Bacteriology (translation, London, 1899); Klein, Micro-organisms and Disease (3rd ed., London, 1896); Kolle and Wassermann, Handbuch der pathogenen Mikroorganismen (Jena, 1904) (supplements are still being published; this is the most important work on the subject); Lofler, Vorlesungen fiber die geschichtliche Entwickelung der Lehre von der Bacterien (Leipzig, 1887); M`Farland, Text-book upon the Pathogenic Bacteria (5th ed., London, 1906); Muir and Ritchie, Manual of Bacteriology (with bibliography, 4th ed., Edin.
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  • 3 See also Edin.
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  • crustaceous animals; and flamingoes (Edin.
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  • James Grant's view that it may have been the earlier name of the castle, from dun (" the fort "), and edin (" on the slope "), conflicts with the more generally received opinion that the Britons knew the fortress as Castelh Mynedh Agnedh (" the hill of the plain "), a designation once wrongly interpreted as the " castle of the maidens " (castrum puellarum), in allusion to the supposed fact that the Pictish princesses were lodged within it during their education.
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  • This integration, employed originally by P. Kelland (Edin.
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