Eadmer sentence example

eadmer
  • He showed a lofty indifference to criticism such as that of Eadmer in the Historia novorum, which was published early in the reign.
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  • Either Florence or a later editor of his work made considerable borrowings from the first four books of Eadmer's Historia novorum.
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  • He became a monk in the Benedictine monastery of Christ Church, Canterbury, where he made the acquaintance of Anselm, at that time visiting England as abbot of Bec. The intimacy was renewed when Anselm became archbishop of Canterbury in 1093; thenceforward Eadmer was not only his disciple and follower, but his friend and director, being formally appointed to this position by Pope Urban II.
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  • Eadmer left a large number of writings, the most important of which is his Historiae novorum, a work which deals mainly with the history of England between 1066 and 1122.
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  • It was first edited by John Selden in 1623 and, with Eadmer's Vita Anselmi, has been edited by Martin Rule for the "Rolls Series" (London, 1884).
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  • Less noteworthy are Eadmer's lives of St Dunstan, St Bregwin, archbishop of Canterbury, and St Oswald, archbishop of York; these are all printed in Henry Wharton's Anglia Sacra, part ii.
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  • (1691), where a list of Eadmer's writings will be found.
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  • The manuscripts of most of Eadmer's works are preserved in the library of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.
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  • He was buried at Ripon, whence, according to Eadmer, his bones were afterwards removed to Canterbury.
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  • Wilfrid's life was written shortly after his death by Eddius at the request of Acca, his successor at Hexham, and Tatbert, abbot of Ripon - both intimate friends of the great bishop. Other lives were written by Frithegode in the loth, by Folcard in the IIth, and by Eadmer early in the 12th century.
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  • William of Malmesbury, Eadmer and Ordericus Vitalis attain a higher historical standard than had yet been reached in England by any one, with the possible exception of Bede.
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