Do with sentence examples

  • Maybe lifting had nothing to do with it.

  • Even as she thought it, she knew her anger had nothing to do with their heritage.

  • Not that one had anything to do with the other, but the technology of surrogacy would have been inconceivable back then.

  • Her sadness had nothing to do with not appreciating their fortune.

  • I'm sorry I kept you waiting, but Tessa had nothing to do with it.

  • I've never had anything to do with drugs.

  • He didn't want anything to do with them, so they didn't exist.

  • I'm sure that had a lot to do with it - that and the connections.

  • Maybe it had something to do with his investments.

  • His concern probably had little to do with her safety, though.

  • This doesn't have anything to do with you fretting about my weight, does it?

  • Maybe his mood had more to do with feeling unappreciated.

  • What does that have to do with it?

  • What did you do with that old road map to your future?

  • See what you can do with those.

  • What did you do with that scorpion this morning - go back and eat it?

  • Good for him, but what does that have to do with me working for him?

  • She knew what she liked, and it rarely had anything to do with what was in style.

  • Unsure what to do with her hands, she rested them on his arms.

  • But what we do with our time after work is strictly between the two of us.

  • Howie doesn't have to work but he still suffers from head trauma, is pretty depressed and frankly, doesn't know what to do with himself.

  • Could it have something to do with Quinn's experimental stuff?

  • What does Howie have to do with ironing clothes and reaping hay?

  • We don't know if Quinn's paraphernalia has anything to do with your dreams.

  • We don't even know if the plants have anything to do with it.

  • What are you going to do with this... gift?

  • No. I had nothing to do with it.

  • What do you do with it... all these numbers?

  • Perhaps I shall make do with those that remain here before I follow the sun westward.

  • I just ask one thing; will you take my word for one item and if you stop this vehicle you'll have more reward than you'll know what to do with.

  • I'll ship it back and safe keep it, but I don't want anything else to do with it.

  • Then what shall I do with them, my dear?

  • She has nothing to do with it!

  • What are you going to do with me?

  • It had something to do with the beautiful woman before him who made him feel for the first time in years.

  • It had something to do with Bianca, with destroying where he'd started with her.

  • If he had anything to do with it, he wouldn't let her leave his side again.

  • What's this have to do with me?

  • She didn't believe she'd turn into a princess any more than she believed she wanted anything to do with killing anyone.

  • "You want nothing to do with this guy, woman," Jule muttered.

  • No one wants anything to do with something like you, he reminded her.

  • The kid was hard to read, and she guessed his anger had more to do with his struggle to understand his new role than the vamps who clearly had no respect for him.

  • What does this have to do with Darian?

  • Darian wants nothing to do with any woman after what he's been through.

  • The others fanned out, and she suddenly felt like a lamb surrounded by a wolf pack trying to decide what to do with her.

  • He could guess what Dusty was pissed about, and it didn't have anything to do with women or rearranging his sectors.

  • I don't know what to do with a crying woman, Han had typed.

  • They left her beyond confused, terrified and certain she didn't want anything to do with Darkyn right now.

  • I want nothing to do with you.

  • It had to do with the tumor.

  • It had nothing to do with you or how I felt.

  • What would Darkyn do with such a damning secret?

  • "I saw what I do with everyone: what it would take to bring you here," he said.

  • When the time is right, you'll know what to do with it.

  • Maybe something to do with her mother—like her mother mistreats her or beats her?

  • It all has to do with the light.

  • What's it got to do with jury duty?

  • "Maybe the 'gold digging bitch,' whoever she is, has something to do with it," Fred offered.

  • Surely that doesn't have anything to do with whatever the court fight is about.

  • What are you going to do with the finger?

  • It's too easy for kids to get liquor and too little else for them to do with their time.

  • It didn't have a thing to do with sex.

  • Finally, he asked, "What are you going to do with the land if you win the case?"

  • It doesn't look like the auctioneer had anything to do with switching the bones.

  • What does all that nonsense have to do with vodka or Billy Langstrom?

  • By this time she was married to Bill Radisson and wanted nothing to do with Mulligan.

  • "What made her beautiful had nothing to do with your tinkering," he snapped.

  • "What I decide to do with my mate is of no concern to you," Darkyn said in a low growl.

  • It had to do with her trip to Hell, with the deal she made Darkyn.

  • It has to do with Erik.

  • The longer he thought, the more he realized his frustration had nothing to do with his duties as Death.

  • It had to do with a certain mate.

  • Josh was gone now, and Lori didn't want anything to do with Destiny.

  • I loved you from the day we met, and it had nothing to do with guilt or pity.

  • Lori, we had nothing to do with the making of the will.

  • All I know is that Carmen had nothing to do with this.

  • She had been taking care of everything to do with their homes for the last few years, so that was familiar territory.

  • What does that have to do with Alex?

  • Honestly, I didn't have anything to do with that.

  • Are you sure your failure to respond doesn't have something to do with his inability to talk?

  • No, your morals have nothing to do with my reluctance to introduce him.

  • Being happy has nothing to do with where you are.

  • Uncertain what to do with either, she kept them.

  • He'd given her something to think about, but her instincts were screaming at her not to have anything to do with this creature.

  • He wanted nothing to do with her, and she rejected him.

  • She had no idea what to do with herself or where to go.

  • One minute, telling me you don't want anything to do with me beyond your duty and the next, sitting on the beach with me for hours because you're worried I'll find a tall building to dive off of, she grumbled.

  • Getting me assigned to Darkyn and taking Gabriel, who won't want anything to do with you when he cares about me?

  • She stood in the hallway, staring at the door slammed in her face, holding a fistful of papers she didn't know what to do with.

  • The paperwork otherwise had nothing to do with Toby or their accusation that she abandoned her kid on the Metro.

  • His anger surprised her with its intensity, and she judged from Ully's reaction that seeing the lord and master pissed was not something the good-natured mad scientist wanted anything to do with.

  • I'm not sure what I want to do with my life.

  • Obviously too long under his keep to know what to do with herself in the real world?

  • I've been waiting for someone to tell me what to do with this human.

  • I haven.t decided what to do with you yet, and you may end up with an assassination contract on your head.

  • It has something to do with your blood monkey.

  • It.s my fault Toby was wandering around without someone watching him, but really, Kris, who assigns a woman an Immortal kid that.s not even her own and expects her to know what to do with it?

  • She stood out of his way, barely able to care for a child and at a loss as to what to do with a boy on the verge of becoming a teenager.

  • He.d have to figure out what to do with the wounded man.

  • She wanted nothing to do with anything from Hell, especially this creature.

  • He had no qualms about ordering dinner for her when she went out with them or telling her what to do with her life.

  • "It has nothing to do with that, Jetr, as you know," he said.

  • The Council wants nothing to do with them and views the presence of your father's betrayer and your people on the planet as a sign the Yirkin are willing to share your planet rather than take it over.

  • Not if it has to do with a man.

  • She wanted nothing to do with this world or its inhabitants, despite that unexpected, intimate connection with the most beautiful man she'd ever seen.

  • And no sexy warrior-- even a prisoner-- would want anything to do with her at all.

  • At the least, she could help him battle plan while she thought hard about what to do with her life.

  • That has nothing to do with you, nishani.

  • By the end of the space journey, she was convinced he'd want nothing to do with her and desperate to see him.

  • "I wonder what they do with the holes," Fred mused as he spooned his breakfast and poured a glass of milk for Donnie.

  • They sell 'em. So what do they do with the Cheerios' holes?

  • What will you do with the dress?

  • The room was a-chatter with foreign conversation, the words having nothing to do with national roots but the fanatic avocation of the gathered guests.

  • My guess is love has nothing to do with it.

  • It had something to do with Bird Song and I think she was afraid you'd fire her.

  • "Something to do with checks," Fred said.

  • It has something to do with a trust fund.

  • I'm not quite sure what to do with that information, but thanks, I guess.

  • The scene he found certainly had nothing to do with breakfast.

  • Sarah, what did you do with the painting?

  • What are you going to do with it?

  • Elisabeth noticed the abrupt change and suspected Jackson had something to do with it.

  • Did it have anything to do with the fact that she would be twenty-one soon, and gain control of her inheritance?

  • I didn't think you wanted anything to do with me anymore.

  • "What do I do with you?" he mused, ignoring her.

  • She'd turned from the sweet, open Angel who kept him company on dark nights to a stranger who wanted nothing to do with him.

  • It had nothing to do with Charlie illicitly selling PMF weapons overseas.

  • I don't want anything to do with your world.

  • Lost in the food fantasy, she didn't see Gabriel disappear into the jungle.  Katie blinked and looked around, still uneasy with the snakelike branches that moved of their own volition overhead.  She didn't know what kind of creatures followed or what other critters would live in the Immortal jungle, but she wanted nothing to do with such a weird place.

  • It was clear and cool outside of Gabe's small cottage in the middle of a possessed jungle.  Rhyn felt the sense that someone else was there once more and looked around.  Assuming the feeling has something to do with his magic, Rhyn shook it off once more.  He opened the front door without knocking, already sensing it was empty.  Gabe had left in a hurry.  The wardrobe near his bed was open and his walls were missing many of the weapons Rhyn had seen last time.

  • "Whatever Darkyn is planning, it has to do with Rhyn.  He let us go.  There were no guards when Rhyn came for me and no demons to stop us," Kiki mused.

  • It has nothing to do with living in Andre's shadow your whole life and now having the chance to prove yourself, she said with a faint smile.

  • What did you do with Katie?

  • I could never make sense of them, but they had to do with being chased by monsters.

  • There were better things to do with his time.

  • The circum­stances have a lot to do with it too.

  • Something to do with their legal department.

  • Only Sackler and Dean of the Parkside crew would know the new location where the Feds would store Baratto until they figured out what to do with him more permanently.

  • You don't know what to do so you take the next day off when you're sober, find some quiet motel and try and figure out what you've got or what to do with the stuff.

  • Only the Lord knew what Linda Segal, The Ice Lady of the Parkside Sentinel, would do with this turn of events.

  • However, Dean possessed no cogent thoughts on what to do with this new information.

  • I want to hear from your mouth your being here has nothing to do with Vinnie Baratto.

  • I think it has something to do with you.

  • It didn't have anything to do with the case.

  • It's nothing to do with dad.

  • She won't have anything to do with him anyway.

  • Something to do with his work?

  • But it didn't have anything to do with Byrne.

  • I didn't sic Nota on anyone—that came from Vinnie Baratto by way of Arthur Atherton and it didn't have a damned thing to do with the Byrne case.

  • Byrne didn't know what to do with me so he rented me a motel room—I didn't have any money with me 'cause I was supposed to stay with my wife.

  • You've got to understand the guy, he didn't want to have any­thing to do with the dough.

  • Maybe – or maybe I just don't know what to do with all that time.

  • Finally there had been direction in her life that had nothing to do with money - animals that had nothing to do with food on the table.

  • Being able to afford it had little to do with it.

  • I've got an idea what you want me to do with it.

  • I guess it depends on what you want to do with it.

  • Age has nothing to do with it, Carmen.

  • How could she tell him that the restlessness she had been feeling had nothing to do with their relationship?

  • She stared at him, a gnawing feeling beginning in her stomach that had nothing to do with hunger.

  • Maybe it had something to do with the fact that his parents had died in a plane crash.

  • Maybe it had nothing to do with the trip.

  • She insisted she didn't want anything to do with the insurance money or the farm — she wanted to get away from everything that reminded her of Josh.

  • Jenn wanted nothing to do with him.

  • She pushed herself away discreetly, not yet certain he knew what to do with all of the magic in his blood.

  • He'd keep an eye on Jenn between his missions to kill Others, even if she didn't seem to want anything to do with him.

  • Then maybe I don't want anything to do with you.

  • The furious part of her wanted nothing to do with letting him admit she'd won until he was mewling at her feet.

  • She hadn't wanted anything to do with Darian.

  • She must survive; he wanted nothing to do with a world if she wasn't in it.

  • What do you intend to do with me?

  • What will you do with Tiyan?

  • She had no intention of wearing sundresses when she was with the guests – and it had nothing to do with being concerned about how she appeared to them.

  • She definitely missed Alex – and it had nothing to do with sex – well, not much anyway.

  • The way I feel about you has nothing to do with father-daughter relationships.

  • Wherever the shiny little blue car had gone, it had nothing to do with her.

  • What was she was going to do with the rest of the day - and weeks?

  • The burning in her eyes had little to do with the creek water, and after such a cowardly display, she didn't want him to catch her crying.

  • At the cabin, she washed a dress in the sink and hung it on the line to dry, taking pride in the fact that she was making do with what was available.

  • Whether or not their life together was a success had little to do with wealth or lack of it.

  • She made do with two jobs, but there was no way to save money for their colleges.

  • Stronger than his curiosity was the knowledge that he wanted nothing to do with whatever Jonny was planning, no doubt against the White God, his sworn enemy.

  • It fell, and I had nothing to do with it, but I'll be Machiavellian about it and simply appreciate the end result, Eden said and then paused.

  • The man who didn't seem to know what to do with her yesterday was toying with her today.

  • I don't want anything to do with him.

  • "Really?" she asked, surprised the handsome man wanted anything to do with her after Xander's warning.

  • Being with someone who seemed normal helped her relax, though she wasn't able to forget he had something to do with Xander.

  • Or, the girl has something to do with it.

  • She found herself staring dreamily into space, trying not to imagine what else he could do with his talented mouth.

  • I don't want you having anything to do with them.

  • It had to do with the necklace he wore beneath the t-shirt, one Jonny would find useful.

  • Whatever you're going through has nothing to do with a brush with death in the immortal world.

  • She didn't understand what she was supposed to do with it around her neck.

  • "Not sure he knows what to do with me, either," Jessi admitted.

  • The agitation had no immediate effect, but the indignation which he aroused against Russian policy had much to do with the strong anti-Russian feeling which made the Crimean War possible.

  • 1 The will, therefore, as being more originative, has more to do with true or false judgments than the understanding.

  • The subject is man, treated as Aristotle does, according to his TE¦os, and so Aquinas discusses all the ethical, psychological and theological questions which arise; but any theological discussion upon man must be mainly ethical, and so a great proportion of the first part, and almost the whole of the second, has to do with ethical questions.

  • This transposition has had, as we shall see, much to do with the history of our subject, ultimately influencing the ecclesiastical chant and lasting until the 17th century of our era.

  • But a positive identity of pitch cannot be claimed for any period of time, and certainly not for the early organs; the foot-rule of the organ-builder, which had to do with the lengths of the pipes, and which varied in every country and province, could easily cause a difference of a semitone.

  • Each arrondissement is divided into sousarrondissements, having their centres in the great commercial ports, but this arrangement is purely for the embodiment of the men of the Inscription Maritime, and has nothing to do with the dockyards as naval arsenals.

  • The root has nothing to do with resting in the sense of enjoying repose; in transitive forms and applications it means to "sever," to "put an end to," and intransitively it means to "desist," to "come to an end."

  • They did not dedicate each day in turn to its astrological planet; and it is therefore precarious to assume that the Sabbath was in its origin what it is in the astrological week, the day sacred to Saturn, and that its observance is to be derived from an ancient Hebrew worship of that planet.4 The week, however, is found in various parts of the world in a form that has nothing to do with astrology or the seven planets, and with such a distribution as to make it pretty certain that it had no artificial origin, but suggested itself independently, and for natural reasons, to different races.

  • Looking at the mace he said, "What shall we do with this bauble?"

  • The breach with Rome and the subjection of the church in England to the royal supremacy had been practically achieved before Cranmer's appointment as archbishop: and he had little to do with the other constitutional changes of Henry's reign.

  • 1 The Design argument has mainly to do with living bodies.

  • Physical geography itself is divided into two parts: a general, which has to do with the earth and all that belongs to it - water, air and land; and a particular, which deals with special products of the earth - mankind, animals, plants and minerals.

  • The action of the society in supplying practical instruction to intending travellers, in astronomy, surveying and the various branches of science useful to collectors, has had much to do with advancement of discovery.

  • Whatever may be the true explanation of stridulating organs in adult beetles, sexual selection can have had nothing to do with the presence of these highly-developed larval structures.

  • In the Coleoptera we have to do with an ancient yet dominant order, in which there is hardly a family that does not show specialization in some point of structure or life-history.

  • Unjustifiable railway expansion had much to do with the American commercial panics of 1884 and 1893.

  • In cases where statutes did touch the question of regulation, they had to do with the operation of trains and with the provision of facilities for shippers and passengers, rather than with questions of rates.

  • In a similar manner, while he abhorred the French Revolution when it came, he seems to have had no apprehension, like Chesterfield, Burke, or even Horace Walpole, of its approach; nor does he appear to have at all suspected that it had had anything to do with the speculations of the philosophic coteries in which he had taken such delight.

  • The cavity of the former has nothing to do with coelom.

  • These cavities communicate with the exterior through the gonad ducts, which have nothing to do with them, but whose coelomic funnels are taken up by them in the course of their growth.

  • We cannot suppose that the policy of the Merchant Adventurers' Company had nothing to do with the woollen industry; that the export trade in woollen cloth was quite independent of the foreign exchanges and international trade relations in those times; that the effect on wages of the state of the currency, the influx of new silver, the character of the harvests, and many other influences can be conveniently ignored.

  • Although economic motives have become more complex, they have just as much and no more to do with general economic reasoning and analysis than the causes of death with the normal expectation of life, or domestic ideals with the birth-rate.

  • So far as we have anything to do with psychology at all, it is the psychology of crowds and not of individuals which we have to consider.

  • It is not certain that the projection of the spire to the originally left side of the shell has anything to do with the falling over of the shell to that side.

  • It is supposed to act in some way as a stimulant in copulation, but possibly has to do with the calcareous covering of the egg-capsule.

  • p. 9, note), " Naturalists have nothing to do with mysticism, and but little with a priori reasoning."

  • Unfortunately none of these, however, can be compared for singularity with Archaeopteryx or with some American fossil forms next to be noticed, for their particular It is true that from the time of Buffon, though he scorned any regular classification, geographical distribution had been occasionally held to have something to do with systematic arrangement; but the way in which the two were related was never clearly put forth, though people who could read between the lines might have guessed the secret from Darwin's Journal of Researches, as well as from his introduction to the Zoology of the " Beagle" Voyage.

  • His advocacy of temperance had much to do with securing the passing of the Forbes Mackenzie Act, which secured Sunday closing and shortened hours of sale for Scotland.

  • Priestley, according to his own account, "had little to do with it."

  • The first week is the foundation, and has to do with the consideration of the end of man, sin, death, judgment and hell.

  • The earlier fathers, Irenaeus, Hippolytus, Tertullian, believed in chiliasm simply because it was a part of the tradition of the church and because Marcion and the Gnostics would have nothing to do with it.

  • The arrests of Sims and of Shadrach in Boston in 1851; of "Jerry" M`Henry, in Syracuse, New York, in the same year; of Anthony Burns in 1854, in Boston; and of the two Garner families in 1856, in Cincinnati, with other cases arising under the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, probably had as much to do with bringing on the Civil War as did the controversy over slavery in the Territories.

  • She was a young lady of twenty, decidedly unconventional and original in character, but the daughter of a Bavarian diplomatist then resident at Geneva, who would have nothing to do with Lassalle.

  • He rather preferred to have to do with common criminals like Malinovsky, Radek or Peters.

  • It is evidently this Marcomeres, the chief of these tribes, who is regarded by later historians as the father of the legendary Faramund (Pharamund) although in fact Marcomeres has nothing to do with the Salian Franks.

  • The assessment and collection of it were the business of the community; the crown, in principle, had nothing to do with them and did not bear the cost of a local administration for the purpose.

  • d d the last written relation having, in regard to each term on th right-hand side, to do with 17r successive linear operations.

  • The truth is that the extent to which national honour is involved depends on factors which have nothing to do with the immediate subject of complaint.

  • "You must address yourselves," he said in the House of Commons, "as men of sense and men of energy, to the question - what are you to do with the Christian population?

  • Although Pell had nothing to do with the solution, posterity has termed the equation Pell's Equation, or Problem, when more rightly it should be the Hindu Problem, in recognition of the mathematical attainments of the Brahmans.

  • in his memoir on Amphioxus, Berlin, 1844) in the way of making out its complete structure than the ablest of his contemporaries or successors could do with a plethora.

  • The visibility of a star is a question of brightness simply, and has nothing to do with resolving power.

  • The question arises whether we have to do with the various tribes of one race in different stages of civilization, or with a mixed population called by foreigners after the ruling tribe.

  • Utilitarian, or perhaps rather practical, considerations have very little to do with the subject from a scientific point of view - no more so than the science of chemistry has to do with the art of the manufacturing chemist.

  • The term " pathogenesis " has reference to the generation and development of disease, and that of " aetiology," in its present bearing, has to do with its causes.

  • This, it need hardly be said, has nothing to do with hypertrophy.

  • Nowak, however, found later that he could generate it where the turpentine failed to induce suppuration; he believes that it may arise quite apart from the influence of the organisms of suppuration, that it is not a biological product of the micro-organisms of disease, and also that it has nothing to do with emaciation.

  • Nor can there be much doubt that the great attention bestowed on acting - the Jesuits kept up the Renaissance practice of turning schools into theatres for the performance of plays both in Latin and in the vernacular - had much to do with Voltaire's lifelong devotion to the stage.

  • In the early autumn of 1751 La Mettrie, one of the king's parasites, and a man of much more talent than is generally allowed, horrified Voltaire by telling him that Frederick had in conversation applied to him (Voltaire) a proverb about "sucking the orange and flinging away its skin," and about the same time the dispute with Maupertuis, which had more than anything else to do with his exclusion from Prussia, came to a head.

  • Her pet name was "Belle et Bonne," and nobody had more to do with the happiness of the last years of the "patriarch" than she had.

  • The more I consider it all, the more I am certain that the mob had the least to do with it..

  • The gild merchant did not give birth to craft fraternities or have anything to do with their origin; nor did it delegate its authority to them.

  • In the manufacture of tobacco for smoking, we have to do with the numerous forms of tobacco used for smoking in pipes, embracing cut smoking mixtures, cake or plug, and roll or spun tobacco.

  • He stood equally remote from the old Voluntary principle, that " the State had nothing to do with religion," and from the sacerdotal position that the clergy stood in an apostolic succession, and either constituted the Church or were the persons into whose hands its guidance had been committed.

  • The promising title may have had something to do with the temporary success of the Memoires secrets de la republique des lettres (1744-1748) of the marquis d'Argens.

  • At the Reformation Luther laid down the principle that the civil government is concerned with the province of the external and temporal life, and has nothing to do with faith and conscience.

  • This scholar holds that " Michabo " has properly nothing to do with " Great Hare," but should be translated " the Great White One," i.e.

  • Nor apparently did the Greek Seleucid kingdom have much to do with the Mountain.

  • Funds were raised for the new organization, and from these the leader and missionaries, who were to have nothing to do with worldly life, drew their pay.

  • Like geography, oceanography may be viewed in two different ways, and is conveniently divided into general oceanography, which deals with phenomena common to the whole ocean, and special oceanography, which has to do with the individual characteristics of the various divisions of the ocean.

  • The blue of the sea-water as observed by the Forel scale has of course nothing to do with the blue appearance of any distant water surface due to the reflection of a cloudless sky.

  • His biographer attributes the comparative failure of the Clavis to its inferiority in point of style, but the crudeness of his thought had quite as much to do with his failure to gain a hearing.

  • The manufactures of Iowa are chiefly such as have to do with the products of the farm.

  • Franklin contended that the governor, as a mere agent of the king, could have nothing to do with the assembly's appointment of its agent to the king; that " the King, and not the King, Lords, and Commons collectively, is their sovereign; and that the King, with their respective Parliaments, is their only legislator."

  • In 1768 and 1774 he was again elected a representative peer for Scotland, but took no further part in politics, and in 1778 refused to have anything to do with the abortive attempt to effect an alliance between himself and Chatham.

  • Doubtless the king's sore financial needs had much to do with the dissolution of the abbeys and the plundering of the shrines, but there is no reason to suppose that he was not fully convinced that the monks had long outlived their usefulness and that the shrines were centres of abject superstition and ecclesiastical deceit.

  • Labour organizations for hunting, communal hunt and migrations had to do with the animal world.

  • It was perhaps the most wanton of all Mary's acts of persecution; Ferrar had been no such protagonist of the Reformation as Cranmer, Ridley, Hooper and Latimer; he had had nothing to do with Northumberland's or Wyatt's conspiracy.

  • The intense conservatism of his character, however, and his antagonistic attitude towards every change, regardless of whether it was necessary or not, had much to do with the alarming state of the navy towards 1889.

  • The remaining history of the Ottoman Empire up to Dec. 1921 has chiefly to do with the deliberations of the Allied Conference in determining the conditions of peace.

  • Time shall show what we mean to do with them; for the present we must keep them off."

  • So Gautsch would have nothing to do with it.

  • The work was one of great political importance, and had much to do with the formation of German public opinion on the rights of the duchies in their struggle with Denmark.

  • The assertion, paradoxical at first sight, that the twenty-eight " hostelries " of the Chinese sphere had nothing to do with the moon's daily motion, seems to convey the actual fact.

  • It must be remembered that the commercial interests of Froben's press led to the introduction of Erasmus's name on many a title page when he had little to do with the book, e.g.

  • At first Catherine and her counsellors could not make up their minds what to do with "the former emperor."

  • 15 whether even at Shiloh the priest had anything to do with sacrifice, whether those who burned the fat were the worshippers themselves or some subordinate ministers of the Temple.

  • 18), but by the time of Ezekiel it also has mainly to do with ritual, with the distinction between holy and profane, clean and unclean, with the statutory observances at festivals and the like (Ezek.

  • There can be no doubt that the Indian conquests of Alexander were the means of making the parrot better known in Europe, and it is in reference to this fact that another Eastern species of Palaeornis now bears the name of P. alexandri, though from the localities it inhabits it could hardly have had anything to do with the Macedonian hero.

  • The Anglo-Saxon name of the Parret, a river in Somerset, is Pedreda or Pedrida, which at first sight looks as if it had to do with the proper name, Petrus; but Skeat believes there is no connexion between them - the latter portion of the word being rio, a stream.

  • In spite of their external similarity the Gymnotidae have nothing to do with the eels (Anguilla).

  • Nestle, however, and other scholars think that the lines in B are merely indications of a division of the text into senseparagraphs and have nothing to do with any harmony.

  • Probably the queen had more to do with the falsification of this rumour than Cecil, though he is said to have opposed in the parliament of 1555 - in which he represented Lincolnshire - a bill for the confiscation of the estates of the Protestant refugees.

  • It appears, however, from Boswell's Life, under date of 29th April 1778, that Johnson had on one occasion quarrelled with Smith at Strahan's house, apparently in London; it is clear that the "unlucky altercation" at Strahan's must have occurred in 1761 or 1763, and could have had nothing to do with the letter on Hume's death.

  • 34), has absolutely nothing to do with the Christian conceptions of salvation.

  • They do not seem ancient enough to have to do with a remote Asiatic origin of the nations of America, but rather to be results of comparatively modern intercourse between Asia and America.

  • (Official Returns of the Board of Trade.) Her most sensational prophecies had to do with Cardinal Wolsey, the duke of Suffolk, Lord Percy and other men prominent at the court of Henry VIII.

  • He now had little to do with politics for some years, and spent his 'time on his Histoire du Consulat et de l'Empire, the first volume of which appeared in 1845.

  • His strong personal will and inflexible opinions had much to do with the resurrection of France; but the very same facts made it inevitable that he should excite violent opposition.

  • This passion finds its clearest expression in the Latin poems. Faustine was guarded by an old and jealous husband, and du Bellay's eventual conquest may have had something to do with his departure for Paris at the end of August 1557.

  • The plot, however, has little to do with history, and is improbable and void of interest.

  • As with road riding, so with hunting, the actual length of the stirrups will depend a good deal upon the shape and action of the horse, but the nature of the animal and the peculiarities of the country ridden over will also have something to do with their adjustment.

  • The secretary has, however, a smaller range of action than a finance minister in European countries, for, as he is excluded from Congress, he has nothing directly to do with the imposition of taxes, and very little with the appropriations for government expenditure.

  • In Charles XII.'s later years Horn had little to do with the administration.

  • Becoming friendly with all parties, he had much to do with the formation of the First Triumvirate, and was one of the chief financiers in Rome.

  • On the other hand, Boas and Pelseneer have shown that the Pteropoda have nothing to do with the Cephalopoda, but are Gastropoda modified for a pelagic life; they are therefore now united with the Gastropoda.

  • The former embraces a range of operations peculiar to silk, dealing as they do with continuous fibres of great length, whereas in the spun silk industry the raw materials are treated by methods analogous to those followed in the treatment of other fibres (see Weaving).

  • Generally, it is that part of archaeology which has to do with inscriptions engraved on stone, metal or other permanent material (not, however, coins, which come under the heading Numismatics) .

  • Yule (Book of Marco Polo) " Respecting the mariner's compass and gunpowder, I shall say nothing, as no one now, I believe, imagines Marco to have had anything to do with their introduction."

  • fact that it has supplied a measurable link connecting E the motions of systems, the structure of which can be directly observed, with physical and chemical phenomena having to do with motions which cannot be similarly traced in detail.

  • How it came by this name has long been a matter of discussion, for it is certain that this valuable animal was introduced to Europe from the New World, and in its introduction had nothing to do with Turkey or with Turks, even in the old and extended sense in which that term was applied to all Mahommedans.

  • His further suggestion, therefore, that the ironical crowning of Jesus with the crown of thorns and the inscription over the Cross, together with the selection of Barabbas, had anything to do with the feast of Purim, must be rejected.

  • He also had much to do with founding the British and Foreign Bible Society and the Religious Tract Society, and in conjunction with James Bennet, minister at Romsey, wrote a well-known History of Dissenters (3 vols., 1809).

  • In his speech of the 18th of December 1865 he asserted that rebellion had ipso facto blotted out of being all states in the South, that that section was then a "conquered province," and that its government was in the hands of Congress, which could do with it as it wished.

  • Thus we see that the purification in these electric furnaces has nothing to do with electricity.

  • They had probably much to do with the relative healthiness of this district in early times.

  • Another theory is that Bretwalda refers to a war-leadership, or imperium, over the English south of the Humber, and has nothing to do with Britons or Britannia.

  • Some Russian sables are of a very dense bluish brown almost a black, which is the origin undoubtedly of the term "sables," while some, from one district in particular, have a quantity of silver hairs, evenly interspersed in the fur, a peculiarity which has nothing to do with age.

  • The burgomaster is entirely dependent upon the police and the chief of the district, and has to discharge all sorts of functions (bailiff, policeman, &c.) which have nothing to do with municipal affairs.

  • But he was overruled by the crown prince Frederick, who thought such a policy too hazardous, when Russia declined to have anything to do with it.

  • It is only fair to say that no real proof was brought that the Socialists had anything to do with either of these crimes, or that either of the men was really a member of the Socialist party; nevertheless, a storm of indignation rose against them.

  • Bismarck therefore, who took this rebuff much to heart, said he would have nothing more to do with the matter, and warned those interested in colonies that they must depend on self-help; he could do nothing for them.

  • It is at least remarkable that, except at Argos, Hera had little to do with agriculture, and was not closely associated with such deities as Cybele, Demeter, Persephone and Dionysus, whose connexion with the earth, or with its fruits, is beyond doubt.

  • The transit trade with the East, which formerly passed overland through Egypt, has been diverted to the Suez Canal, the traffc through which has little to do with the trade or shipping of Egypt.

  • In all these struggles he was more or less unsuccessful, owing partly to the fact that he had to do with superior generals (e.g.

  • But the poem probably had originally nothing to do with the genealogy.

  • In 1880 he entertained Mr Gladstone at Dalmeny, and during the "Mid Lothian campaign" he had much to do with the stage-management of the demonstrations.

  • The king had to do with preachers who practically held the doctrines of Becket as to priestly pretensions.

  • " Neither fair nor other means are likely to do with them " (the fanatics), says Baillie, principal of Glasgow University, himself a Covenanter from the beginning.

  • Save a mention of the Tell chapel on "Tellsplatte" in 1504 (the first known before was that by Tschudi in 1572), and a proof that the pilgrimages to Burglen and Steinen had nothing to do with "St KUmmerniss," as her images are preserved in the parish churches of those villages, whereas the pilgrims go to the chapels therein, he brings forward no new evidence.

  • These conquests had much to do with the securing by the United States of the country W.

  • It has to do with those who challenge it from the first.

  • Brahms's Deutsches requiem has nothing to do with the Mass for the dead, being simply a large choral work on a text compiled from the Bible by the composer.

  • The majority of the best theologians held that Indulgences had nothing to do with the pardoning of guilt, but only with freeing from temporal penalties in this life or in purgatory.

  • Madison precipitately accepted this proposition and sent Albert Gallatin and James Bayard to act as commissioners with Mr Adams; but England would have nothing to do with it.

  • This event is of importance, as it had much to do with the remarkable development of Jewish colonization which is a special feature of the latter part of the history of the 19th century in Palestine.

  • When Protagoras included in his course grammar, style, interpretation of the poets, and oratory, supplementing his own continuous expositions by disputations in which he and his pupils took part, he showed a not inadequate appreciation of the requisites of a literary education; and it may be conjectured that his comprehensive programme, which Prodicus and others extended, had something to do with the development of that versatility which was the most notable element in the Athenian character.

  • For they were the true champions of the theocratic principle; through their elimination it became clear that the struggle had in no sense anything to do with the cause of God.

  • Hosain, who had refused to have anything to do with the revolt, was treated with all honour.

  • Unfortunately for Zaid he had to do with the same Kufians whose fickleness had already been fatal to his family.

  • Azhi Dahaka (Zohak), the mythical king of the Iranian epics, who has nothing whatever to do with the historical king of the Medes.

  • The exclusion had much to do with making the huge single crop ranches unprofitable and in leading to their replacement by small farms and varied crops.

  • These theories have to do with the being to whom the ransom is paid or the sacrifice offered.

  • Flexner and C. Hunter Stewart, pointing out that the evidence, so far from showing that Mr Haffkine's laboratory was to blame, made it clear to those acquainted with bacteriological work that it could have had nothing to do with the occurrence.

  • All that can be said is that an attack along these roads was apparently unexpected; that it came; and that it had much to do with the disaster that followed.

  • There are, however, many other episodes that have nothing to do with Beowulf himself, but seem to have been inserted with a deliberate intention of making the poem into a sort of cyclopaedia of Germanic tradition.

  • But, although there is no reason to doubt the existence of a family of " Homeridae," it is far from certain that they had anything to do with Homeric poetry.

  • Judicial functions are in the hands of the elders, who " have to do with suits " (Sucao'ir6Xot), and " uphold judgments " (Nyt6Tas Edpbarat).

  • When we analyse the whole group of phenomena which have to be considered, we perceive that some of the most essential have nothing or little to do with the recovery of the classics.

  • One of the most important of his investigations had to do with the manufacture of guncotton, and he developed a process, consisting essentially of reducing the nitrated cotton to fine pulp, which enabled it to be prepared with practically no danger and at the same time yielded the product in a form that increased its usefulness.

  • The fourth office is that of the deacons, who have to do with 1 " Tulchan," a calf-skin filled with straw, supposed to induce the cow to give milk freely; hence a term of contempt for one who is used as a dummy for the advantage of another.

  • The idea of final cause is also fruitful in sciences which have to do with human action.

  • We have here to do with the latter only.

  • Although we have here nothing to do with mixed races, yet the want of fertility in these has been often taken to be a fact inherent in the mongrel race, and has been also sometimes held to prove that neither the European nor his half-bred offspring can maintain themselves in the tropics.

  • Warden in his Linen Trade says: "For years after its introduction the principal spinners refused to have anything to do with jute, and cloth made of it long retained a tainted reputation.

  • He had much to do with the witchcraft persecution of his day; in 1692 when the magistrates appealed to the Boston clergy for advice in regard to the witchcraft cases in Salem he drafted their reply, upon which the prosecutions were based; in 1689 he had written Memorable Providences Relating to Witchcraft and Possessions, and even his earlier diaries have many entries showing his belief in diabolical possession and his fear and hatred of it.

  • Spinoza's position is based upon the thoroughgoing distinction drawn in the book between philosophy, which has to do with knowledge and opinion, and theology, or, as we should now say, religion, which has to do exclusively with obedience and conduct.

  • The queen sent for him for the last time and burst into passionate tears as she asked, "What have you to do with my marriage?

  • piece of gold; the word has nothing to do with the name of Darius), a gold piece of 130 grains (value about 23s.); this being equivalent to 20 silver pieces (Median shekels, at-yXoi) of 86.5 grains (value according to the then fate of silverI33/4 silver to I goldabout is.

  • The Parthian magnates, on the other hand, with the army, would have little to do with Greek culture and Greek modes of life, which they contemptuously regarded as effeminate and unmanly.

  • Perhaps the domestic affliction of the emperor arid the anarchy which in his later years had spread in his dominions had, however, more to do with the maintenance of tranquillity than any mere personal feeling.

  • Treachery may have had to do with the result, for when the shahs troops entered the holy city the ealar sought refuge in the mosque of Imam Riza, and was forcibly expelled.

  • Persons might be members who had nothing to do with the craft, and the rise of great capitalists and the development of competition in trade made the regulation of industry by means of companies no longer possible.

  • It need hardly be remarked that this has nothing whatever to do with the older book.

  • by Alcuin (1751; 2nd ed., Bristol, 1829), has nothing to do with this or with any Hebrew original, but is a mere fabrication by the printer, Jacob Ilive, who put it forward as the book " mentioned in Holy Scripture."

  • But Wykeham had nothing to do with building either the Round Tower or the Round Table.

  • 61, p. 17) when Wykeham had nothing to do with Windsor.

  • At all events he had very little to do with building Windsor Castle.

  • The fact that agglutinins appear in the body at an early stage in a disease has been taken by some observers as indicating that they have nothing to do with immunity, their development being spoken of as a reaction of infection.

  • He had personally less to do with the successes in India than with the other great enterprises that shed an undying lustre on his administration; but his generous praise in parliament stimulated the genius of Clive, and the forces that acted at the close of the struggle were animated by his indomitable spirit.

  • We find long treatises on the nature of being, idealistic dreams which have as little to do with the Bodhisatship that is concerned with the salvation of the world as with the Arahatship that is concerned with the perfect life.

  • The stars are held, not only to prognosticate the future but also to influence it; the child born when Mars is in the ascendant will be war-like; Venus has to do with love; the sign of the Lion presides over places where wild beasts are found.

  • His particular admiration among the college professors was the stately rhetorician, Edward Everett; and this predilection had much to do with his early ambition to be a professor of rhetoric and elocution.

  • The arrangement of the chapters is purely liturgical, although their matter in part has nothing to do with the liturgical action.

  • He was again dismissed without a pension, on the 10th of December 1770, for refusing to have anything to do with Struensee.

  • The already existing worship of Athena Hygieia had nothing to do with Hygieia the goddess of health, but merely denoted the recognition of the power of healing as one of the attributes of Athena, which gradually became crystallized into a concrete personality.

  • As the stones are thrown on the days of the fair, it is not unlikely that they have something to do with the old Arab mode of closing a sale by the purchaser throwing a stone (Biruni, p. 328).

  • Philosophy is such an impertinently litigious lady, that a man has as good be engaged in lawsuits, as have to do with her.

  • In 1886 the governor of Natal received a paper from Umbandine (Mbandini), the paramount chief of the Swazis, stating that Piet Joubert had called on him and requested him to sign a paper saying that "he and all the Swazis agreed to go over and recognize the authority of the Boer government, and have nothing more to do with the English."

  • There is no reason to suppose that the central apical plate of certain free-swimming crinoids has any more to do with the distal foot-plate of the larval Antedon stem than has the so-called centrodorsal of Antedon itself, which is nothing but the compressed proximal end of the stem.

  • That the conversion of the English to Christianity had anything to do with their slackening from the work of conquest it would be wrong to assert.

  • Perhaps the long predominance of Mercia, an essentially inland state, had something to do with the fact.

  • An angry altercation followed, for Comyn would have nothing to do with the scheme, and Bruce and his followers finally slew him before the altar of a church into which he had fled.

  • Pitt, Grey, Lord Sheffield, all plunged into confused and angry debate as to whether the French Revolution was a good thing, and whether the French Revolution, good or bad, had anything to do with the Quebec Bill.

  • Tyndall's experiments, however, were carried out on quite different lines, and have nothing to do with fluorescence.

  • The social and political influence of this intellectual improvement among the various communities of the empire soon made itself felt, and had much to do with the startling success of the constitutional revolution carried out, under the direction of the Committee of Union and Progress, in the autumn of 1908.

  • Turks have little if anything to do with trade on a large scale.

  • But when these arrangements were brought to the point of completion, Disraeli dropped out of the scheme and had nothing more to do with it.

  • Neither seems to have paid up, and that, perhaps, had to do with the quarrel which parted Benjamin Disraeli and John Murray before a sheet of the luckless Representative was printed.

  • But they were essentially antipathetic persons; and it is clear that the great minister and complete Briton took no pains to understand the dazzling young Jew of whom Lyndhurst thought so much, and wished to have little to do with him.

  • Hermann and Dorothea, published in 1800, had already placed him in the first rank of authorities on aesthetics, and, together with his family connexions, had much to do with his appointment at Rome; while in the years 1795 and 1797 he had brought out translations of several of the odes of Pindar, which were held in high esteem.

  • Although Apollo has nothing to do with the earlier cult of Artemis, nor Artemis with that of Delphi, their association was a comparatively early one, and probably originated in Delos.

  • Reflection, " though it be not sense, as having nothing to do with external objects," is yet, he says, " very like it, and might properly enough be called internal sense."

  • When further he teaches that the attainment of happiness depends almost entirely upon insight and right calculation, fortune having very little to do with it; that the pleasures and pains of the mind are far more important than those of the body, owing to the accumulation of feeling caused by memory and anticipation; and that an indispensable condition of mental happiness lies in relieving the mind of all superstitions, which can be effected only by a thorough knowledge of the physical universe - he introduces an ample area for the exercise of the philosophic intellect.

  • The idea that he had anything to do with the poetic Edda in general, or the Sun's Song in particular, is unfounded.

  • His hatred of England and his desire to avenge the disasters of the Seven Years' War led to his support of the American States in the War of Independence, a step of which the moral and financial results had not a little to do with the Revolution of 1789.

  • The descriptive branch found its principle of development in the growing powers of the telescope, and had little to do with mathematical theory; which, on the contrary, was closely allied, by relations of mutual helpfulness, with practical astronomy, or " astrometry."

  • For while he maintains constantly his favourite maxim "that there is nothing in the intellect which has not been in the senses" (nihil in intellectu quod non pries fuerit in sensu), while he contends that the imaginative faculty (phantasia) is the counterpart of sense - that, as it has to do with material images, it is itself, like sense, material, and essentially the same both in men and brutes; he at the same time admits that the intellect, which he affirms to be immaterial and immortal - the most characteristic distinction of humanity - attains notions and truths of which no effort of sensation or imagination can give us the slightest apprehension (Op. ii..383).

  • He contributed largely to The Gentleman's Magazine, The Monthly Review and The Library; and he had a good deal to do with the establishment and conduct of The New Annual Register.

  • These were particularly seen in everything having to do with the burial of a monarch.

  • And his story, which was more prolonged, had to do with the attitude of many countries towards England.

  • The power which they had been the first to invoke having thus declared so emphatically and persistently against them, the Donatists revived the old world-alien Christianity of the days of persecution, and repeated Tertullian's question, "What has the emperor to do with the church ?"

  • The cabinet seemed stronger than it really was, for it was divided by intestine quarrels, and the earl of Chatham refused to have anything to do with it.

  • The people having to do with horses at that time were as conservative in their notions as most of the grooms are now, and the " Markham Arabian " was not at all approved of.

  • The most plausible view is that we have to do with sunlight reflected from meteoric particles moving round the sun within the region of the lens.

  • Direct proof that we have to do with reflected sunlight is therefore still incomplete.

  • When attacked it seeks to escape either by rolling itself into a ball, its erect spines proving a formidable barrier to its capture, or by burrowing into the sand, which its powerful limbs enable it to do with great celerity.

  • flag or standard-bearer, for that military title, as in the case of Shakespeare's "ancient Pistol"; but this use has nothing to do with "ancient" meaning "old."

  • There is reason to believe that these young herrings are derived from a local "winter" race spawning about February and March, and having nothing to do with the great shoals of the more open sea spawning in the North Sea in November.

  • Although he had little to do with the negotiations, he signed with Franklin and Deane in February 1778 the treaties between the United States and France.

  • Henceforth he had much to do with railway affairs and became a railway financier.

  • The Polish commander now showed the Swedes what he could do with adequate forces.

  • But logic had nothing to do with emotion.

  • Still, her sadness had nothing to do with not appreciating their fortune.

  • I've kind of given up on my past but I'm curious if this has anything to do with it.

  • Quinn, maybe you should monitor your gizmo stuff in case it has anything to do with this.

  • That he was the Black God was another issue he and Damian didn't know what to do with.

  • You will bring me Jule's body, or I will invite the Watchers in to do with you as they please.

  • Xander was there for a reason, and Damian suspected it had something to do with the immortals plaguing both gods.

  • Unfortunately, none of them knew what to do with an Oracle.

  • Maybe something to do with her mother—like her mother mistreats her or beats her?

  • May I assume you're not a serial killer stalking me and this spying business has something to do with my pending litigation?

  • My bet is Fitzgerald switched the bones to embarrass you, but that doesn't mean he had anything to do with causing them to be in the mine in the first place.

  • He was calming, though it had nothing to do with Fate's presence.

  • Was he still the reluctant mate that didn't know what to do with her?

  • The reason I.m lying here in pain has to do with my accidental ambush of Darkyn.s demons, the demon replied.

  • If you're right about what happened, there must be some consolation in knowing Edith's death had nothing to do with you.

  • We will procure some proper blood, and decide what to do with you.

  • I just feel like a bastard for dragging her and her son into something that has nothing to do with them.

  • When he didn't at first answer, she asked, cautiously, "Does it have something to do with Jeff?"

  • I didn't sic Nota on anyone—that came from Vinnie Baratto by way of Arthur Atherton and it didn't have a damned thing to do with the Byrne case.

  • Byrne didn't know what to do with me so he rented me a motel room—I didn't have any money with me 'cause I was supposed to stay with my wife.

  • Maybe – or maybe I just don't know what to do with all that time.

  • She insisted she didn't want anything to do with the insurance money or the farm — she wanted to get away from everything that reminded her of Josh.

  • Does this have anything to do with the Watchers stalking Jule and me?

  • Coward. You say you want nothing to do with me.

  • I know the warlord of Tiyan wants nothing to do with a slave, but it will not take them long to learn who you are.

  • She had no intention of wearing sundresses when she was with the guests – and it had nothing to do with being concerned about how she appeared to them.

  • She definitely missed Alex – and it had nothing to do with sex – well, not much anyway.

  • The doubt in his eyes would have nothing to do with her declaration now.

  • If they failed, it would have little to do with her heritage and much to do with how they faced adversity – and if they faced it together.

  • Maybe that oh-so-sexy vampire thing you do with your assistant at the end of every show?

  • It had to do with a certain Guardian named Gerry who was at the heels of Toni.

  • Even less was his refusal to have anything to do with the government formed under U.N. auspices.

  • I'm still incredulous at the idea that oil had nothing to do with this political problem in the Middle East.

  • The most frequently reiterated question has to do with the cost of parking downtown.

  • admire what he was able to do with what he was given.

  • But they are not to do with the existing degree of private affluence and public squalor.

  • Some people want to maximize the sum of human happiness which has nothing to do with inclusive fitness, it's almost antithetical.

  • Apparently it's all to do with timing and getting apprehensive of the flashing.

  • I think I could do with a new Ariel.

  • assailed on all sides by the very many different things that are available for people to do with their time.

  • The answer to the question has much to do with the question of why the Germans never tried to make an atomic bomb.

  • And the skating position has nothing to do with double axels and pirouettes!

  • Initially, Kate, formerly a session bassist in NYC, wanted nothing more to do with the music business ever again.

  • bayou country this do with himself man who lived.

  • I saw Uncle Charlie at his worst because he was quite blatant in his refusal to have anything to do with Company affairs.

  • The large concrete blockhouse beside the beach probably has much to do with this.

  • In place of slum-dwelling and the Means Test, problems to do with schooling, crime and family breakup dominate the contemporary social agenda.

  • When you had taken the briefcase, what did you do with it?

  • bugger all to do with ' the dark side of the 80s ' .

  • burnout rate among worship leaders has to do with the lack of adequate training.

  • sorry I cant give everyone involved a reward but you will have to make do with my heartfelt thanks instead.

  • You can recycle cardboard at any of the household waste recycling centers What should I do with excess paper?

  • You start behaving like you do with a child who can't speak yet - you do charades.

  • ANSWER: Eighty-eight What would you do with a Spanish chorizo?

  • clef in the autograph score could have had more to do with convenience than instrument specification.

  • Maybe you are stuck with a growing amount of copper coinage, that perhaps, you do not really know what to do with.

  • There has also been more constructive critical comment, some of it having to do with the level of generality of the document.

  • Like all things to do with God there have been negative comments about Jabez.

  • In the country, you simply have to make do with what you've got, in terms of the human companionship.

  • And what are they going to do with my valuable consignment?

  • Neither of the two has anything to do with the charge of textual corruption of the Holy Bible.

  • You don't suppose _she_ has anything to do with this extraordinary freak of com cribbage game line yahoo yours?

  • Another useful thing to do with make is to restart a daemon.

  • declassifythe declassified material has to do with target design.

  • What has this got to do with the imminent demise of the randomized trial?

  • Trade unions at the Earth Summit You may think sustainable development has very little to do with trade unions.

  • There simply is a profound disagreement about what you do with the bible.

  • This last objective has nothing to do with competition policy and is in fact the opposite: protection in thin disguise.

  • There are good reasons for keeping species distinct, which have to do with the balance of the ecosystem.

  • Still, he could do with some new dusters here.

  • Such actions might produce results which satisfy the ego, but have little to do with our renewal as relating beings.

  • In fact the range of things you can do with an image in digital form is virtually endless.

  • They run up against the DIY ethos which has to do with not having institutions.

  • Dr. K Black, from the Scottish executive 's marine laboratory in Argyll, says it's nothing to do with fish farm excrement.

  • I work in a firearms unit and therefore have little to do with mobile phones and noisy exhausts.

  • However it is more to do with the whole explosion of interest in short films being utterly fallacious.

  • The defender, otherwise faultless, had got himself in a pickle about what to do with a long ball over the top.

  • To do with taking flak from call rather than.

  • And I doubt whether it has anything more to do with a few fashionable flirtations than it has with his poor neglected wife.

  • You must admit not much you can do with a concrete flyover - except flyover!

  • family folklore has rather assumed that Richard Jones had something to do with the founding of the ECC.

  • Reel memories Have you returned from your holidays with hours of unedited footage you don't know what to do with?

  • forgetforgot to tell Apache what to do with the php files.

  • You don't suppose _she_ has anything to do with this extraordinary freak of yours?

  • And what do glowing gherkins have to do with astronomy?

  • gobbet of wisdom before you know what to do with it.

  • Such accents have much to do with the subtle gradations of class in a big city.

  • Now one might reasonably ask what Sanskrit grammar has to do with mathematics.

  • But then, his selection had more to do with his appreciation of greased palms than of greased palms than of greased locomotive axles.

  • For this reason it can always do with a boost from a liver tonic herb.

  • hey whats that got to do with creating an issue!

  • This magnanimity is not a product of modern humanitarianism; it is not a product of anything to do with peace.

  • ill-treated the girls, but he never had anything to do with them.

  • impassioned debate: is has nothing to do with a valid relation?

  • import substitution, they were to do with sustainability generally.

  • She had been given no information about anything to do with the Home.

  • She gives a quite extraordinary performance, as much to do with body language as dialog, as the deeply introverted Pomme.

  • It has even used people's very natural fear of terrorism to justify intrusions that having nothing to do with tackling that threat.

  • This site hasn't one iota to do with research, comparative religion, or anything based in facts.

  • Currently languishing at the bottom of the premier league they could do with some cheering up.

  • lassie come Home grief: nothing whatsoever to do with the guy who sang the songs with the catchy tunes.

  • Also what has the brain lateralization do with it.

Browse other sentences examples →