Denisov sentence example

denisov
  • The best quarters in the village were assigned to cavalry-captain Denisov, the squadron commander, known throughout the whole cavalry division as Vaska Denisov.
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  • "What about your master?" he asked Lavrushka, Denisov's orderly, whom all the regiment knew for a rogue.
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  • Rostov looked out of the window and saw Denisov coming home.
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  • Denisov was a small man with a red face, sparkling black eyes, and black tousled mustache and hair.
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  • "Ah, you're up already," said Denisov, entering the room.
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  • I lost yesterday like a damned fool! cried Denisov, not pronouncing his r's.
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  • Denisov's face puckered still more.
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  • They plucked me last night, came Denisov's voice from the next room.
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  • In the passage Denisov, with a pipe, was squatting on the threshold facing the quartermaster who was reporting to him.
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  • On seeing Rostov, Denisov screwed up his face and pointing over his shoulder with his thumb to the room where Telyanin was sitting, he frowned and gave a shudder of disgust.
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  • I only came round to ask Denisov about yesterday's order.
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  • Have you got it, Denisov?
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  • Denisov was sitting there scratching with his pen on a sheet of paper.
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  • Denisov frowned and was about to shout some reply but stopped.
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  • "Please, Denisov, let me lend you some: I have some, you know," said Rostov, blushing.
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  • "Don't like bowwowing from my own fellows, I don't," growled Denisov.
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  • And Denisov went to the bed to get the purse from under the pillow.
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  • Denisov threw both pillows on the floor.
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  • Rostov felt Denisov's gaze fixed on him, raised his eyes, and instantly dropped them again.
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  • "Now then, you devil's puppet, look alive and hunt for it!" shouted Denisov, suddenly, turning purple and rushing at the man with a threatening gesture.
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  • Rostov, his eyes avoiding Denisov, began buttoning his coat, buckled on his saber, and put on his cap.
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  • "I must have that purse, I tell you," shouted Denisov, shaking his orderly by the shoulders and knocking him against the wall.
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  • "Denisov, let him alone, I know who has taken it," said Rostov, going toward the door without raising his eyes.
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  • Denisov paused, thought a moment, and, evidently understanding what Rostov hinted at, seized his arm.
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  • "And I tell you, don't you dahe to do it!" shouted Denisov, rushing at the cadet to restrain him.
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  • But Rostov pulled away his arm and, with as much anger as though Denisov were his worst enemy, firmly fixed his eyes directly on his face.
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  • "That money is Denisov's; you took it..." he whispered just above Telyanin's ear.
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  • That same evening there was an animated discussion among the squadron's officers in Denisov's quarters.
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  • Ask Denisov whether it is not out of the question for a cadet to demand satisfaction of his regimental commander?
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  • Denisov sat gloomily biting his mustache and listening to the conversation, evidently with no wish to take part in it.
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  • Am I not right, Denisov?
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  • Denisov remained silent and did not move, but occasionally looked with his glittering black eyes at Rostov.
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  • "That's twue, devil take it!" shouted Denisov, jumping up.
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  • "I tell you," shouted Denisov, "he's a fine fellow."
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  • Denisov began to laugh.
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  • "And what has become of that scoundrel?" he asked Denisov.
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  • "He has weported himself sick, he's to be stwuck off the list tomowwow," muttered Denisov.
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  • I'd kill him! shouted Denisov in a bloodthirsty tone.
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  • Nesvitski looked round and saw, some fifteen paces away but separated by the living mass of moving infantry, Vaska Denisov, red and shaggy, with his cap on the back of his black head and a cloak hanging jauntily over his shoulder.
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  • "The squadwon can't pass," shouted Vaska Denisov, showing his white teeth fiercely and spurring his black thoroughbred Arab, which twitched its ears as the bayonets touched it, and snorted, spurting white foam from his bit, tramping the planks of the bridge with his hoofs, and apparently ready to jump over the railings had his rider let him.
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  • The soldiers crowded against one another with terrified faces, and Denisov joined Nesvitski.
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  • "They don't even give one time to dwink!" answered Vaska Denisov.
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  • "What a dandy you are today!" said Nesvitski, looking at Denisov's new cloak and saddlecloth.
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  • The imposing figure of Nesvitski followed by his Cossack, and the determination of Denisov who flourished his sword and shouted frantically, had such an effect that they managed to squeeze through to the farther side of the bridge and stopped the infantry.
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  • Having cleared the way Denisov stopped at the end of the bridge.
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  • Every face, from Denisov's to that of the bugler, showed one common expression of conflict, irritation, and excitement, around chin and mouth.
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  • Look at me, cried Denisov who, unable to keep still on one spot, kept turning his horse in front of the squadron.
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  • The black, hairy, snub-nosed face of Vaska Denisov, and his whole short sturdy figure with the sinewy hairy hand and stumpy fingers in which he held the hilt of his naked saber, looked just as it usually did, especially toward evening when he had emptied his second bottle; he was only redder than usual.
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  • "Well, what about it?" said he to Denisov.
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  • "The devil only knows what they're about!" muttered Denisov.
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  • Denisov galloped up to him.
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  • Denisov rode past him, leaning back and shouting something.
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  • Come back, Cadet! he cried angrily; and turning to Denisov, who, showing off his courage, had ridden on to the planks of the bridge:
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  • "Oh, every bullet has its billet," answered Vaska Denisov, turning in his saddle.
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  • So you've smelt powdah! shouted Vaska Denisov just above his ear.
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  • "Was that grapeshot?" he asked Denisov.
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  • "Yes and no mistake!" cried Denisov.
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  • And Denisov rode up to a group that had stopped near Rostov, composed of the colonel, Nesvitski, Zherkov, and the officer from the suite.
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  • "Fo'ward, with God, lads!" rang out Denisov's voice.
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  • For a moment he dozed, but in that short interval innumerable things appeared to him in a dream: his mother and her large white hand, Sonya's thin little shoulders, Natasha's eyes and laughter, Denisov with his voice and mustache, and Telyanin and all that affair with Telyanin and Bogdanich.
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  • About some Denisov or other, though he himself, I dare say, is braver than any of them.
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  • When the Emperor had passed nearly all the regiments, the troops began a ceremonial march past him, and Rostov on Bedouin, recently purchased from Denisov, rode past too, at the rear of his squadron--that is, alone and in full view of the Emperor.
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  • Rostov himself, his legs well back and his stomach drawn in and feeling himself one with his horse, rode past the Emperor with a frowning but blissful face "like a vewy devil," as Denisov expressed it.
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  • At dawn on the sixteenth of November, Denisov's squadron, in which Nicholas Rostov served and which was in Prince Bagration's detachment, moved from the place where it had spent the night, advancing into action as arranged, and after going behind other columns for about two thirds of a mile was stopped on the highroad.
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  • Let's dwink to dwown our gwief! shouted Denisov, who had settled down by the roadside with a flask and some food.
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  • The officers gathered round Denisov's canteen, eating and talking.
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  • Denisov called out to the Cossacks.
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  • Late that night, when all had separated, Denisov with his short hand patted his favorite, Rostov, on the shoulder.
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  • "Denisov, don't make fun of it!" cried Rostov.
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  • Oh, but Denisov's a fine fellow.
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  • Denisov was going home to Voronezh and Rostov persuaded him to travel with him as far as Moscow and to stay with him there.
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  • Meeting a comrade at the last post station but one before Moscow, Denisov had drunk three bottles of wine with him and, despite the jolting ruts across the snow-covered road, did not once wake up on the way to Moscow, but lay at the bottom of the sleigh beside Rostov, who grew more and more impatient the nearer they got to Moscow.
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  • Denisov gave no answer.
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  • Denisov raised his head, coughed, and made no answer.
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  • "Do wake up, Vaska!" he went on, turning to Denisov, whose head was again nodding.
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  • Rostov, who had completely forgotten Denisov, not wishing anyone to forestall him, threw off his fur coat and ran on tiptoe through the large dark ballroom.
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  • Denisov, who had come into the room unnoticed by anyone, stood there and wiped his eyes at the sight.
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  • "Vasili Denisov, your son's friend," he said, introducing himself to the count, who was looking inquiringly at him.
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  • I know, I know, said the count, kissing and embracing Denisov.
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  • The same happy, rapturous faces turned to the shaggy figure of Denisov.
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  • "Darling Denisov!" screamed Natasha, beside herself with rapture, springing to him, putting her arms round him, and kissing him.
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  • Denisov blushed too, but smiled and, taking Natasha's hand, kissed it.
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  • Denisov was shown to the room prepared for him, and the Rostovs all gathered round Nicholas in the sitting room.
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  • "Hallo, Gwiska--my pipe!" came Vasili Denisov's husky voice.
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  • Denisov hid his hairy legs under the blanket, looking with a scared face at his comrade for help.
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  • "Or is it yours?" he said, addressing the black-mustached Denisov with servile deference.
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  • "And is Denisov nice?" she asked.
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  • Is he very terrible, Denisov?
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  • The races, the English Club, sprees with Denisov, and visits to a certain house--that was another matter and quite the thing for a dashing young hussar!
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  • A minority of those present were casual guests--chiefly young men, among whom were Denisov, Rostov, and Dolokhov--who was now again an officer in the Semenov regiment.
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  • Nicholas Rostov, with Denisov and his new acquaintance, Dolokhov, sat almost at the middle of the table.
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  • Dolokhov, Denisov, and Rostov were now sitting opposite Pierre and seemed very gay.
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  • "One should make up to the husbands of pretty women," said Denisov.
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  • Despite Denisov's request that he would take no part in the matter, Rostov agreed to be Dolokhov's second, and after dinner he discussed the arrangements for the duel with Nesvitski, Bezukhov's second.
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  • Pierre went home, but Rostov with Dolokhov and Denisov stayed on at the club till late, listening to the gypsies and other singers.
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  • Next day, at eight in the morning, Pierre and Nesvitski drove to the Sokolniki forest and found Dolokhov, Denisov, and Rostov already there.
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  • Denisov first went to the barrier and announced: As the adve'sawies have wefused a weconciliation, please pwoceed.
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  • "Cover yourself!" even Denisov cried to his adversary.
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  • Denisov, Rostov, and Nesvitski closed their eyes.
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  • Rostov and Denisov drove away with the wounded Dolokhov.
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  • Early in the winter Denisov also came back and stayed with them.
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  • There now, I like your Denisov though he is a rake and all that, still I like him; so you see I do understand.
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  • For the Rostov family the whole interest of these preparations for war lay in the fact that Nicholas would not hear of remaining in Moscow, and only awaited the termination of Denisov's furlough after Christmas to return with him to their regiment.
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  • It was a grand farewell dinner, as he and Denisov were leaving to join their regiment after Epiphany.
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  • About twenty people were present, including Dolokhov and Denisov.
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  • "Where would I not go at the countess' command!" said Denisov, who at the Rostovs' had jocularly assumed the role of Natasha's knight.
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  • Nicholas and Denisov were walking up and down, looking with kindly patronage at the dancers.
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  • "How sweet she is--she will be a weal beauty!" said Denisov.
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  • "Countess Natasha," answered Denisov.
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  • "About your sister," ejaculated Denisov testily.
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  • "Look how many charming young ladies-" He turned with the same request to Denisov who was also a former pupil of his.
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  • "No, my dear fellow, I'll be a wallflower," said Denisov.
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  • Denisov sat down by the old ladies and, leaning on his saber and beating time with his foot, told them something funny and kept them amused, while he watched the young people dancing, Iogel with Natasha, his pride and his best pupil, were the first couple.
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  • Denisov did not take his eyes off her and beat time with his saber in a way that clearly indicated that if he was not dancing it was because he would not and not because he could not.
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  • Knowing that Denisov had a reputation even in Poland for the masterly way in which he danced the mazurka, Nicholas ran up to Natasha:
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  • Go and choose Denisov.
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  • When it came to Natasha's turn to choose a partner, she rose and, tripping rapidly across in her little shoes trimmed with bows, ran timidly to the corner where Denisov sat.
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  • Nicholas saw that Denisov was refusing though he smiled delightedly.
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  • "Oh no, let me off, Countess," Denisov replied.
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  • She can do anything with me! said Denisov, and he unhooked his saber.
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  • Only on horse back and in the mazurka was Denisov's short stature not noticeable and he looked the fine fellow he felt himself to be.
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  • Denisov, flushed after the mazurka and mopping himself with his handkerchief, sat down by Natasha and did not leave her for the rest of the evening.
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  • With a sinking heart he watched Dolokhov's hands and thought, "Now then, make haste and let me have this card and I'll take my cap and drive home to supper with Denisov, Natasha, and Sonya, and will certainly never touch a card again."
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  • Denisov, with sparkling eyes and ruffled hair, sat at the clavichord striking chords with his short fingers, his legs thrown back and his eyes rolling as he sang, with his small, husky, but true voice, some verses called "Enchantress," which he had composed, and to which he was trying to fit music:
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  • All wight! shouted Denisov.
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  • Sonya was sitting at the clavichord, playing the prelude to Denisov's favorite barcarolle.
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  • Denisov was looking at her with enraptured eyes.
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  • He continued to pace the room, looking gloomily at Denisov and the girls and avoiding their eyes.
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  • "Yes, that's me!" she seemed to say, answering the rapt gaze with which Denisov followed her.
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  • Natasha, that winter, had for the first time begun to sing seriously, mainly because Denisov so delighted in her singing.
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  • If it is true that Monsieur Denisov has made you a proposal, tell him he is a fool, that's all!
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  • I will tell him myself, and you'll listen at the door, and Natasha ran across the drawing room to the dancing hall, where Denisov was sitting on the same chair by the clavichord with his face in his hands.
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  • Denisov bent over her hand and she heard strange sounds she did not understand.
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  • "Vasili Dmitrich, I thank you for the honor," she said, with an embarrassed voice, though it sounded severe to Denisov--"but my daughter is so young, and I thought that, as my son's friend, you would have addressed yourself first to me.
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  • "Countess..." said Denisov, with downcast eyes and a guilty face.
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  • "Countess, I have done w'ong," Denisov went on in an unsteady voice, "but believe me, I so adore your daughter and all your family that I would give my life twice over..."
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  • Next day Rostov saw Denisov off.
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  • After Denisov's departure, Rostov spent another fortnight in Moscow, without going out of the house, waiting for the money his father could not at once raise, and he spent most of his time in the girls' room.
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  • When returning from his leave, Rostov felt, for the first time, how close was the bond that united him to Denisov and the whole regiment.
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  • Rostov lived, as before, with Denisov, and since their furlough they had become more friendly than ever.
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  • Denisov evidently tried to expose Rostov to danger as seldom as possible, and after an action greeted his safe return with evident joy.
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  • Rostov took the joke as an insult, flared up, and said such unpleasant things to the officer that it was all Denisov could do to prevent a duel.
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  • Denisov patted him on the shoulder and began rapidly pacing the room without looking at Rostov, as was his way at moments of deep feeling.
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  • Denisov and Rostov were living in an earth hut, dug out for them by the soldiers and roofed with branches and turf.
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  • Denisov, who was living luxuriously because the soldiers of his squadron liked him, had also a board in the roof at the farther end, with a piece of (broken but mended) glass in it for a window.
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  • He was pleasantly considering the probability of being promoted in a few days for his last reconnoitering expedition, and was awaiting Denisov, who had gone out somewhere and with whom he wanted a talk.
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  • Suddenly he heard Denisov shouting in a vibrating voice behind the hut, evidently much excited.
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  • He could hear that Lavrushka--that sly, bold orderly of Denisov's--was talking, as well as the quartermaster.
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  • Then Denisov's voice was heard shouting farther and farther away.
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  • Five minutes later, Denisov came into the hut, climbed with muddy boots on the bed, lit his pipe, furiously scattered his things about, took his leaded whip, buckled on his saber, and went out again.
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  • "Let God and our gweat monarch judge me afterwards!" said Denisov going out, and Rostov heard the hoofs of several horses splashing through the mud.
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  • He did not even trouble to find out where Denisov had gone.
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  • Denisov had not yet returned.
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  • A little behind the hussars came Denisov, accompanied by two infantry officers with whom he was talking.
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  • "Haven't I told you I won't give them up?" replied Denisov.
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  • "And mine have had nothing for two weeks," said Denisov.
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  • "Now, what are you pestewing me for?" cried Denisov, suddenly losing his temper.
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  • "Go to the devil! quick ma'ch, while you're safe and sound!" and Denisov turned his horse on the officer.
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  • A weal dog astwide a fence! shouted Denisov after him (the most insulting expression a cavalryman can address to a mounted infantryman) and riding up to Rostov, he burst out laughing.
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  • The next day the regimental commander sent for Denisov, and holding his fingers spread out before his eyes said:
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  • From the regimental commander's, Denisov rode straight to the staff with a sincere desire to act on this advice.
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  • Denisov could not speak and gasped for breath.
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  • Alarmed at Denisov's condition, Rostov suggested that he should undress, drink some water, and send for the doctor.
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  • The regimental doctor, when he came, said it was absolutely necessary to bleed Denisov.
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  • "I get there," began Denisov.
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  • Who is it that's starving us? shouted Denisov, hitting the table with the fist of his newly bled arm so violently that the table nearly broke down and the tumblers on it jumped about.
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  • Denisov was bandaged up again and put to bed.
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  • But at noon the adjutant of the regiment came into Rostov's and Denisov's dugout with a grave and serious face and regretfully showed them a paper addressed to Major Denisov from the regimental commander in which inquiries were made about yesterday's occurrence.
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  • The case, as represented by the offended parties, was that, after seizing the transports, Major Denisov, being drunk, went to the chief quartermaster and without any provocation called him a thief, threatened to strike him, and on being led out had rushed into the office and given two officials a thrashing, and dislocated the arm of one of them.
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  • In answer to Rostov's renewed questions, Denisov said, laughing, that he thought he remembered that some other fellow had got mixed up in it, but that it was all nonsense and rubbish, and he did not in the least fear any kind of trial, and that if those scoundrels dared attack him he would give them an answer that they would not easily forget.
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  • Every day, letters of inquiry and notices from the court arrived, and on the first of May, Denisov was ordered to hand the squadron over to the next in seniority and appear before the staff of his division to explain his violence at the commissariat office.
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  • Denisov, as was his wont, rode out in front of the outposts, parading his courage.
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  • Perhaps at another time Denisov would not have left the regiment for so slight a wound, but now he took advantage of it to excuse himself from appearing at the staff and went into hospital.
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  • Rostov, who felt his friend's absence very much, having no news of him since he left and feeling very anxious about his wound and the progress of his affairs, took advantage of the armistice to get leave to visit Denisov in hospital.
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  • Rostov explained that he wanted to see Major Denisov of the hussars, who was wounded.
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  • "Major Denisov," Rostov said again.
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  • Rostov described Denisov's appearance.
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  • Looking for Vasili Dmitrich Denisov?
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  • Denisov lay asleep on his bed with his head under the blanket, though it was nearly noon.
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  • How are you, how are you? he called out, still in the same voice as in the regiment, but Rostov noticed sadly that under this habitual ease and animation some new, sinister, hidden feeling showed itself in the expression of Denisov's face and the intonations of his voice.
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  • What struck him was that Denisov did not seem glad to see him, and smiled at him unnaturally.
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  • Rostov even noticed that Denisov did not like to be reminded of the regiment, or in general of that other free life which was going on outside the hospital.
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  • His hospital companions, who had gathered round Rostov--a fresh arrival from the world outside--gradually began to disperse as soon as Denisov began reading his answer.
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  • In the middle of the reading, the Uhlan interrupted Denisov.
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  • "Me petition the Empewo'!" exclaimed Denisov, in a voice to which he tried hard to give the old energy and fire, but which sounded like an expression of irritable impotence.
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  • "Well, let it be bad," said Denisov.
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  • Denisov interrupted him, went on reading his paper.
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  • Denisov was moodily silent all the evening.
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  • Late in the evening, when Rostov was about to leave, he asked Denisov whether he had no commission for him.
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  • "Yes, wait a bit," said Denisov, glancing round at the officers, and taking his papers from under his pillow he went to the window, where he had an inkpot, and sat down to write.
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  • In it was the petition to the Emperor drawn up by the auditor, in which Denisov, without alluding to the offenses of the commissariat officials, simply asked for pardon.
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  • Having returned to the regiment and told the commander the state of Denisov's affairs, Rostov rode to Tilsit with the letter to the Emperor.
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  • Rostov had come to Tilsit the day least suitable for a petition on Denisov's behalf.
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  • All is over between us, but I won't leave here without having done all I can for Denisov and certainly not without getting his letter to the Emperor.
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  • "I come from Major Denisov," answered Rostov.
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  • Rostov, in dismay, began justifying himself, but seeing the kindly, jocular face of the general, he took him aside and in an excited voice told him the whole affair, asking him to intercede for Denisov, whom the general knew.
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  • Hardly had Rostov handed him the letter and finished explaining Denisov's case, when hasty steps and the jingling of spurs were heard on the stairs, and the general, leaving him, went to the porch.
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  • Now he remembered Denisov with his changed expression, his submission, and the whole hospital, with arms and legs torn off and its dirt and disease.
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  • Then again he thought of Lazarev rewarded and Denisov punished and unpardoned.
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  • Nicholas Rostov experienced this blissful condition to the full when, after 1807, he continued to serve in the Pavlograd regiment, in which he already commanded the squadron he had taken over from Denisov.
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  • I was in love with Boris, with my teacher, and with Denisov, but this is quite different.
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  • When they prayed for the warriors, she thought of her brother and Denisov.
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  • I'm Lieutenant Colonel Denisov, better known as 'Vaska,' said Denisov, pressing Prince Andrew's hand and looking into his face with a particularly kindly attention.
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  • Prince Andrew knew Denisov from what Natasha had told him of her first suitor.
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  • Denisov rose and began gesticulating as he explained his plan to Bolkonski.
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  • Well, good-by, General, he added, and rode into the yard past Prince Andrew and Denisov.
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  • But at that moment Denisov, no more intimidated by his superiors than by the enemy, came with jingling spurs up the steps of the porch, despite the angry whispers of the adjutants who tried to stop him.
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  • Denisov, having given his name, announced that he had to communicate to his Serene Highness a matter of great importance for their country's welfare.
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  • Denisov came from those parts and knew the country well.
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  • And from that hut, while Denisov was speaking, a general with a portfolio under his arm really did appear.
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  • "What?" said Kutuzov, in the midst of Denisov's explanations, "are you ready so soon?"
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  • Kutuzov swayed his head, as much as to say: "How is one man to deal with it all?" and again listened to Denisov.
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  • "I give my word of honor as a Wussian officer," said Denisov, "that I can bweak Napoleon's line of communication!"
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  • "What relation are you to Intendant General Kiril Andreevich Denisov?" asked Kutuzov, interrupting him.
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  • He was listening to the general's report-- which consisted chiefly of a criticism of the position at Tsarevo- Zaymishche--as he had listened to Denisov, and seven years previously had listened to the discussion at the Austerlitz council of war.
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  • All that Denisov had said was clever and to the point.
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  • On October 22, Denisov (who was one of the irregulars) was with his group at the height of the guerrilla enthusiasm.
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  • Besides Denisov and Dolokhov (who also led a small party and moved in Denisov's vicinity), the commanders of some large divisions with staffs also knew of this convoy and, as Denisov expressed it, were sharpening their teeth for it.
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  • Two of the commanders of large parties--one a Pole and the other a German--sent invitations to Denisov almost simultaneously, requesting him to join up with their divisions to attack the convoy.
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  • Having arranged matters thus, Denisov and Dolokhov intended, without reporting matters to the higher command, to attack and seize that convoy with their own small forces.
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  • Through these forests Denisov and his party rode all day, sometimes keeping well back in them and sometimes coming to the very edge, but never losing sight of the moving French.
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  • That morning, Cossacks of Denisov's party had seized and carried off into the forest two wagons loaded with cavalry saddles, which had stuck in the mud not far from Mikulino where the forest ran close to the road.
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  • Denisov had two hundred, and Dolokhov might have as many more, but the disparity of numbers did not deter Denisov.
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  • Denisov in a felt cloak and a sheepskin cap from which the rain ran down was riding a thin thoroughbred horse with sunken sides.
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  • Beside Denisov rode an esaul, * Denisov's fellow worker, also in felt cloak and sheepskin cap, and riding a large sleek Don horse.
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  • Denisov's horse swerved aside to avoid a pool in the track and bumped his rider's knee against a tree.
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  • "Oh, the devil!" exclaimed Denisov angrily, and showing his teeth he struck his horse three times with his whip, splashing himself and his comrades with mud.
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  • On coming to a path in the forest along which he could see far to the right, Denisov stopped.
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  • The esaul looked in the direction Denisov indicated.
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  • Denisov, frowning, took the envelope and opened it.
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  • "There, they kept telling us: 'It's dangerous, it's dangerous,'" said the officer, addressing the esaul while Denisov was reading the dispatch.
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  • Petya! exclaimed Denisov, having run through the dispatch.
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  • "Well, I am glad to see you," Denisov interrupted him, and his face again assumed its anxious expression.
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  • "Will there be any orders, your honor?" he asked Denisov, holding his hand at the salute and resuming the game of adjutant and general for which he had prepared himself, "or shall I remain with your honor?"
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  • To weturn at once? asked Denisov.
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  • "Well, all wight," said Denisov.
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  • Denisov himself intended going with the esaul and Petya to the edge of the forest where it reached out to Shamshevo, to have a look at the part of the French bivouac they were to attack next day.
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  • Denisov, Petya, and the esaul, accompanied by some Cossacks and the hussar who had the prisoner, rode to the left across a ravine to the edge of the forest.
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  • Denisov, the esaul, and Petya rode silently, following the peasant in the knitted cap who, stepping lightly with outturned toes and moving noiselessly in his bast shoes over the roots and wet leaves, silently led them to the edge of the forest.
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  • Denisov and Petya rode up to him.
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  • "Bwing the prisoner here," said Denisov in a low voice, not taking his eyes off the French.
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  • A Cossack dismounted, lifted the boy down, and took him to Denisov.
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  • Pointing to the French troops, Denisov asked him what these and those of them were.
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  • The boy, thrusting his cold hands into his pockets and lifting his eyebrows, looked at Denisov in affright, but in spite of an evident desire to say all he knew gave confused answers, merely assenting to everything Denisov asked him.
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  • Denisov turned away from him frowning and addressed the esaul, conveying his own conjectures to him.
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  • Petya, rapidly turning his head, looked now at the drummer boy, now at Denisov, now at the esaul, and now at the French in the village and along the road, trying not to miss anything of importance.
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  • "Whether Dolokhov comes or not, we must seize it, eh?" said Denisov with a merry sparkle in his eyes.
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  • "We'll send the infantwy down by the swamps," Denisov continued.
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  • For a moment Denisov and the esaul drew back.
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  • "The wascal!" said Denisov.
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  • "What a beast!" said Denisov with his former look of vexation.
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  • "Oh, yes," said Petya, nodding at the first words Denisov uttered as if he understood it all, though he really did not understand anything of it.
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  • When Denisov had come to Pokrovsk at the beginning of his operations and had as usual summoned the village elder and asked him what he knew about the French, the elder, as though shielding himself, had replied, as all village elders did, that he had neither seen nor heard anything of them.
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  • Denisov had Tikhon called and, having praised him for his activity, said a few words in the elder's presence about loyalty to the Tsar and the country and the hatred of the French that all sons of the fatherland should cherish.
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  • "We don't do the French any harm," said Tikhon, evidently frightened by Denisov's words.
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  • Next day when Denisov had left Pokrovsk, having quite forgotten about this peasant, it was reported to him that Tikhon had attached himself to their party and asked to be allowed to remain with it.
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  • Denisov gave orders to let him do so.
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  • Denisov then relieved him from drudgery and began taking him with him when he went out on expeditions and had him enrolled among the Cossacks.
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  • In Denisov's party he held a peculiar and exceptional position.
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  • After talking for some time with the esaul about next day's attack, which now, seeing how near they were to the French, he seemed to have definitely decided on, Denisov turned his horse and rode back.
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  • As they approached the watchhouse Denisov stopped, peering into the forest.
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  • When he espied Denisov he hastily threw something into the bushes, removed his sodden hat by its floppy brim, and approached his commander.
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  • He lifted his head high and gazed at Denisov as if repressing a laugh.
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  • "Well, where did you disappear to?" inquired Denisov.
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  • What a wogue--it's just as I thought, said Denisov to the esaul.
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  • He turned his eyes rapidly from Tikhon's face to the esaul's and Denisov's, unable to make out what it all meant.
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  • "Don't play the fool!" said Denisov, coughing angrily.
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  • Denisov smiled, and Petya burst into a peal of merry laughter in which Tikhon himself joined.
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  • "You are a bwute!" said Denisov.
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  • 'Shout loud at them,' he says, 'and you'll take them all,' Tikhon concluded, looking cheerfully and resolutely into Denisov's eyes.
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  • "I'll give you a hundwed sharp lashes--that'll teach you to play the fool!" said Denisov severely.
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  • "Well, let's go," said Denisov, and rode all the way to the watchhouse in silence and frowning angrily.
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  • Denisov at once cheered up and, calling Petya to him, said: "Well, tell me about yourself."
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  • So now the general explicitly forbade his taking part in any action whatever of Denisov's.
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  • That was why Petya had blushed and grown confused when Denisov asked him whether he could stay.
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  • It was already growing dusk when Denisov, Petya, and the esaul rode up to the watchhouse.
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  • In the room three officers of Denisov's band were converting a door into a tabletop.
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  • "So then what do you think, Vasili Dmitrich?" said he to Denisov.
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  • Denisov repeated with a smile.
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  • "Yes, he's a poor little fellow," said Denisov, who evidently saw nothing shameful in this reminder.
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  • A poor little fellow, Denisov repeated.
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  • Petya was standing at the door when Denisov said this.
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  • He slipped in between the officers, came close to Denisov, and said:
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  • And having kissed Denisov he ran out of the hut.
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  • The arrival of Dolokhov diverted Petya's attention from the drummer boy, to whom Denisov had had some mutton and vodka given, and whom he had had dressed in a Russian coat so that he might be kept with their band and not sent away with the other prisoners.
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  • He took off his wet felt cloak in a corner of the room, and without greeting anyone went up to Denisov and began questioning him about the matter in hand.
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  • Denisov told him of the designs the large detachments had on the transport, of the message Petya had brought, and his own replies to both generals.
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  • "There's no need for you to go at all," said Denisov, addressing Dolokhov, "and as for him, I won't let him go on any account."
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  • "Have you had that youngster with you long?" he asked Denisov.
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  • I send them away and take a weceipt for them, shouted Denisov, suddenly flushing.
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  • "But for you and me, old fellow, it's time to drop these amenities," continued Dolokhov, as if he found particular pleasure in speaking of this subject which irritated Denisov.
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  • Yes, yes, certainly! cried Petya, blushing almost to tears and glancing at Denisov.
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  • But above all Denisov must not dare to imagine that I'll obey him and that he can order me about.
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  • And to all Denisov's persuasions, Petya replied that he too was accustomed to do everything accurately and not just anyhow, and that he never considered personal danger.
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  • Tell Denisov, 'at the first shot at daybreak,' said Dolokhov and was about to ride away, but Petya seized hold of him.
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  • Having returned to the watchman's hut, Petya found Denisov in the passage.
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  • Then, noticing that Denisov was asleep, he rose and went out of doors.
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  • Denisov came out of the watchman's hut and, having called Petya, gave orders to get ready.
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  • Denisov stood by the watchman's hut giving final orders.
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  • "Well, is ev'wything weady?" asked Denisov.
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  • Denisov was angry with the Cossack because the saddle girths were too slack, reproved him, and mounted.
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  • His horse by habit made as if to nip his leg, but Petya leaped quickly into the saddle unconscious of his own weight and, turning to look at the hussars starting in the darkness behind him, rode up to Denisov.
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  • Denisov seemed to have forgotten Petya's very existence.
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  • Denisov talked in whispers with the esaul and the Cossacks rode past Petya and Denisov.
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  • When they had all ridden by, Denisov touched his horse and rode down the hill.
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  • Petya rode beside Denisov, the pulsation of his body constantly increasing.
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  • Having reached the valley, Denisov looked back and nodded to a Cossack beside him.
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  • At the first sound of trampling hoofs and shouting, Petya lashed his horse and loosening his rein galloped forward, not heeding Denisov who shouted at him.
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  • "Done for!" he said with a frown, and went to the gate to meet Denisov who was riding toward him.
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  • "Killed?" cried Denisov, recognizing from a distance the unmistakably lifeless attitude--very familiar to him--in which Petya's body was lying.
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  • "We won't take them!" he called out to Denisov.
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  • Denisov did not reply; he rode up to Petya, dismounted, and with trembling hands turned toward himself the bloodstained, mud-bespattered face which had already gone white.
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  • And the Cossacks looked round in surprise at the sound, like the yelp of a dog, with which Denisov turned away, walked to the wattle fence, and seized hold of it.
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  • Among the Russian prisoners rescued by Denisov and Dolokhov was Pierre Bezukhov.
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  • That same day he had learned that Prince Andrew, after surviving the battle of Borodino for more than a month had recently died in the Rostovs' house at Yaroslavl, and Denisov who told him this news also mentioned Helene's death, supposing that Pierre had heard of it long before.
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  • Besides the Bezukhov family, Nicholas' old friend the retired General Vasili Dmitrich Denisov was staying with the Rostovs this fifth of December.
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  • At that table were his mother, his mother's old lady companion Belova, his wife, their three children with their governess and tutor, his wife's nephew with his tutor, Sonya, Denisov, Natasha, her three children, their governess, and old Michael Ivanovich, the late prince's architect, who was living on in retirement at Bald Hills.
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  • Thanks to Denisov the conversation at table soon became general and lively, and she did not talk to her husband.
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  • And everything annoyed her--Denisov's shouting and laughter, Natasha's talk, and especially a quick glance Sonya gave her.
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  • Denisov, now a general on the retired list and much dissatisfied with the present state of affairs, had arrived during that fortnight.
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  • Denisov, who had come out of the study into the dancing room with his pipe, now for the first time recognized the old Natasha.
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  • "He's come!" she exclaimed as she ran past, and Denisov felt that he too was delighted that Pierre, whom he did not much care for, had returned.
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  • At tea all sat in their accustomed places: Nicholas beside the stove at a small table where his tea was handed to him; Milka, the old gray borzoi bitch (daughter of the first Milka), with a quite gray face and large black eyes that seemed more prominent than ever, lay on the armchair beside him; Denisov, whose curly hair, mustache, and whiskers had turned half gray, sat beside countess Mary with his general's tunic unbuttoned; Pierre sat between his wife and the old countess.
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  • Denisov, not being a member of the family, did not understand Pierre's caution and being, as a malcontent, much interested in what was occurring in Petersburg, kept urging Pierre to tell them about what had happened in the Semenovsk regiment, then about Arakcheev, and then about the Bible Society.
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  • Nicholas and Denisov rose, asked for their pipes, smoked, went to fetch more tea from Sonya--who sat weary but resolute at the samovar--and questioned Pierre.
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  • Denisov, dissatisfied with the government on account of his own disappointments in the service, heard with pleasure of the things done in Petersburg which seemed to him stupid, and made forcible and sharp comments on what Pierre told them.
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  • "Well, what would you do?" asked Denisov.
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  • The Tugendbund is all vewy well for the sausage eaters, but I don't understand it and can't even pwonounce it, interposed Denisov in a loud and resolute voice.
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  • Denisov started these and Pierre was particularly agreeable and amusing about them.
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  • They all fell on me--Denisov and Natasha...
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