Decretum sentence example

decretum
  • the Decretum Gelassii, § 20) in spite of his services to Christian literature.
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  • Gratian's Decretum mirrors two tendencies, the church legislation with its growingly less extended application, and the wide meaning as in Justinian's Code, owing to the revival of Roman law in the 11th century.
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  • The theory and practice of papal absolutism was successfully promulgated by Gratian in his Decretum, completed at Bologna about 1142.
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  • (492-496) included them in the list of apocryphal books condemned by the Decretum de libris recipiendis et non recipiendis; but they were accepted as authentic by the pseudo-Dionysius (de nominbus divinis c. 3), whose writings date probably from the 5th century, and by Gregory of Tours (d.
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  • Fidei Analysis, 1652) in connexion with the word " articles.'" Another term to be considered is decretum, the old Latin equivalent for 66yya.
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  • On the other hand, the Augsburg Confession protests its loyalty to the decretum of Nice.
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  • Every one of its own findings is a decretum - except five, among the sacramental chapters, each of which is headed doctrina.
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  • The Decretum pro Jacobitis, published on the 4th of February 1442, is, like that for the Armenians, of high dogmatic interest, as it summarizes the doctrine of the great medieval scholastics on the points in controversy.
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  • As to the so-called Decretum Gelasii de libris recipiendis et non recipiendis, it also is a compilation of documents anterior to Gelasius, and it is difficult to determine Gelasius's contributions to it.
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  • FRANCISCUS GRATIANUS, compiler of the Concordia di,s cordantium canonum or Decretum Gratiani, and founder of the science of canon law, was born about the end of the filth century at Chiusi in Tuscany or, according to another account, at Carraria near Orvieto.
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  • For some account of the Decretum Gratiani and its history see Canon Law.
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  • Gratian's Concordia discordantium canonum, as he called his Decretum, was another strong influence, Lombard doing in a sense for theology what Gratian did for the canon law.
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  • (Orlando Bandinelli), pope from 1159 to 1181, was a Siennese, and as a teacher of canon law in Bologna composed the Stroma or the Summa Magistri Rolandi, one of the earliest commentaries on the Decretum Gratiani.
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  • 2 Gratian, in the 12th century, tried to explain this away by assuming that concubinage here referred to meant a formless marriage; but in 398 a church council can scarcely so have misused the technical terms of the then current civil law (Gratian, Decretum, pars i.
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  • Similarly, it has become customary to give the name of canons to the texts inserted in certain canonical complications such as the Decretum of Gratian, while the name of chapters is given to the analogous quotations from the Books of the Decretals.
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  • Having made these general observations, we must now consider the history of those texts and collections of canons which to-day form the ecclesiastical law of the Western Church: (1) up to the Decretum of Gratian, (2) up to the council of Trent, (3 and 4) up to the present day, including the codification ordered by Pius X.
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  • From the Beginning to the Decretum of Gratian.
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  • in twenty books of Burchard, bishop of Worms (1112-1122), the Decretum or Collectarium, 4 very widely spread and known under the name of Brocardum, of which the 1 9th book, dealing with the process of confession, is specially noteworthy.
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  • His Panormia, compiled about 1095 or 10 9 6, is a handy and well-arranged collection in 8 books; as to the Decretum a wei ht No of > > g y Chartres.
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  • But all these works were to be superseded by the Decretum of Gratian.
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  • It is certainly Decretum the work which had the greatest influence on the of Gratian.
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  • He was a Camaldulensian monk of the convent of St Felix at Bologna, where he taught canon law, and published, probably in 1148, his treatise called at first Concordantia discordantium canonum, but soon known under the name of the Decretum.
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  • Nowadays, and for some time past, the only part of the Decretum considered is the collection of texts; but it is actually a treatise, in which the author endeavours to piece together a coherent juridical system from the vast body of texts, of widely differing periods and origin, which are furnished by the collections.
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  • Considered from the point of view of official authority, the Decretum occupies an intermediate position very difficult to.
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  • The Decretum has thus remained a work of private authority, and the texts embodied in it have only that legal value which they possess in themselves.
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  • The disciples of Gratian, in glossing or commenting on the Decretum, turned to the papal decretals, as they appeared, for information and the determination of doubtful points.
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  • But we must not forget that these compilations were intended by their authors to complete the Decretum of Gratian; in them were included the decretals called extravagantes, i.e.
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  • quae vagabantur extra Decretum.
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  • extra Decretum).
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  • Passing over the first Additiones to the Decretum and the Appendix concilii Lateranensis (council of 1179), we "Q ° Inoue comila- will speak only of the Quinque compilationes, 2 which tiones.
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  • The result of all these supplements to Gratian's work, apart from the inconvenience caused by their being so scattered, was the accumulation of a mass of material almost as considerable as the Decretum itself, from which they Decretals Y tended to split off and form an independent whole, ixGregory embodying as they did the latest state of the law.
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  • wished to supersede the compilationes, he had no idea of superseding the Decretum of Gratian, still less of Their codifying the whole of the canon law.
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  • The chief of the glossatores of the Decretum of Gratian were Paucapalea, the first disciple of the master, Rufinus (1160-1170), John of Faenza (about 1170), Joannes Teutonicus (about 1210), whose glossary, revised and completed by Bartholomeus Brixensis (of Brescia) became the glossa ordinaria decreti.
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  • The first decree (Decretum de fide et ecclesia) declared that the Catholic Church has no right to introduce new dogmas, but only to preserve in its original purity the faith once delivered by Christ to His apostles, and is infallible only so far as it conforms to Holy Scripture and true tradition; the Church, moreover is a purely spiritual body and has no authority in things secular.
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  • in the Corpus juris canonici (1879-1881); " Hostiensis " Super Decretum; W.
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  • So late as the 11th century Bishop Burchard of Worms thought it necessary to fulminate against the excesses connected with it (Decretum, xix.
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  • In the Corpus juris canonici the Decretum (pt.
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  • in the Decretum Gelasii, of an apocryphal Gospel of Barnabas (see APOCRYPHAL LITERATURE), but we have no knowledge of its contents.
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  • Holden again quotes the (indefinite) decretum of the Council of Basel regarding the Immaculate Conception.
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  • Silvestri), was forged at Rome some time between the middle and end of the 8th century, was included in the 9th century in the collection known as the False Decretals, two centuries later was incorporated in the Decretum by a pupil of Gratian, and in Gibbon's day was still "enrolled among the decrees of the canon law," though already rejected "by the tacit or modest censure of the advocates of the Roman church."
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  • The treatise on canon law known as the Decretum Gratiani, which was compiled towards the middle of the 12th century and had an enduring and far-reaching effect (see Canon Law), merely gave theoretical sanction to the existing situation in the Church.
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  • The Decretum forbade their alienation to lay proprietors, denounced excommunication against those who refused to pay, and based the right of the Church upon scriptural precedents.6 The decretals contained provisions as to what was and what was not tithable property, as to those privileged from payment, as to sale or hypothecation to laymen, as to priority over state taxes, &c. 7 Various questions which arose later were settled by Boniface VIII.
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  • His principal works are In Gratiani Decretum commentarii (4 vols., Venice, 1578); Expositio brevis et utilis super toto psalterio (Mainz, 1474); Quaestiones spirituales super evangelic totius anni (Brixen, 7498); Summa ecclesiastica (Salamanca, 1550).
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  • Most of the canons, however, which constitute the ancient law, and notably those which appear in the Decretum of Gratian, emanate fr.,m local councils, or even from individual bishops; they have found a place in the common law because the collections of canons, of which they formed the most notable part, have been everywhere adopted.
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  • The Decretum of Gratian and the Corpus Juris Canonici.
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  • On the other hand, the Decretum actually enjoys a certain public authority which is unique; for centuries it has been the text on which has been founded the instruction in canon law in all the universities; it has been glossed and commented on by the most illustrious canonists; it has become, without being a body of laws, the first part of the Corpus juris canonici, and as such it has been cited, corrected and edited by the popes.
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  • Passing over the first Additiones to the Decretum and the Appendix concilii Lateranensis (council of 1179), we "Q ° Inoue comila- will speak only of the Quinque compilationes, 2 which tiones.
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  • Mill's saying: " All ages of English history have given one 1 The history of this commission and the rules which it followed for editing the Decretum, will he found in Laurin, Introductio in corpus juris canonici, p. 63, or in the Prolegomena to Friedberg's edition of the Decretum.
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  • More than one scholar of the 16th century, George Cassander, Erasmus, and the two editors of the Decretum of Gratian, Dumoulin (d.
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