Davout sentence example

davout
  • Next came the marshals, namely, Berthier, Murat, Massena, Augereau, Lannes, Jourdan, Ney, Soult, Brune, Davout, Bessieres, Moncey, Mortier and Bernadotte.
    0
    0
  • Even Davout, minister of war, advised him that the destinies of France rested solely with the chambers.
    0
    0
  • Marmont and Davout were deficient in horses for cavalry and artillery, and the troops in Boulogne, having been drawn together for the invasion of England, had hardly any transport at all, as it was considered this want could be readily supplied on landing.
    0
    0
  • corps (Davout) Lichtenfels; Guard and headquarters, Bamberg.
    0
    0
  • Murat and Bernadotte via Zeitz to Naumburg; Davout (III.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The whole army, upwards of 120,000 men, could therefore have - been concentrated against Lannes and Augereau by the afternoon of the 13th, whilst Soult could only have intervened very late in the day, and Davout and Bernadotte were still too distant to reach the battlefield before the 14th.
    0
    0
  • on the 13th) a day of rest for all except Davout, Bernadotte, Lannes and Murat.
    0
    0
  • However, it was evident that the bulk of the Prussians lay to his left, and instructions were at once despatched to Davout to turn westward from Naumburg towards Kdsen and to bring Bernadotte with him if the two were still together.
    0
    0
  • Davout in obedience to his orders of the previous morning was packed on the narrow plateau of the mountain, whilst, below in the ravines on either flank, Soult on the right, and Augereau on the left, were getting into position.
    0
    0
  • So desperate had been their resistance that the Prussians unanimously stated Davout's strength at double the actual figure.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Probably no man but Davout could have got so much out of his men, but why was he left unsupported?
    0
    0
  • On the 26th of October Davout reached Berlin, having marched 166 m.
    0
    0
  • Scarcely leaving his troops time to restore their worn-out footgear, or for the cavalry to replace their jaded horses from captured Prussian resources, he set Davout in motion towards Warsaw on the 2nd of November, and the remainder of the army followed in successive echelons as rapidly as they could be despatched.
    0
    0
  • Davout entered Warsaw on the 30th of November, being followed by the V., IV.
    0
    0
  • His orders were at once issued and complied with with such celerity that by the 31st he stood prepared to advance with the corps of Soult, Ney, Davout and Augereau, the Guard and the reserve cavalry (80,000 men on a front of 60 m.) from Myszienec through Wollenberg to Gilgenberg; whilst Lannes on his right towards Ostrolenka and Lefebvre (X.) at Thorn covered his outer flanks.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • During the night Augereau and the Guards had arrived, and Ney and Davout were expected on either flank in the forenoon.
    0
    0
  • Napoleon's own forces thus became the " general advanced guard " for Ney and Davout, who were to close in on either side and deliver the decisive stroke.
    0
    0
  • But here too the weather and the state of the roads operated adversely, for Ney came up too late, while Davout, in the full tide of his victorious advance, was checked by the arrival of Lestocq, whose corps Ney had failed to intercept, Campaign Of 1807 In Poland And Prussia Scale.
    0
    0
  • Davout was turned about and directed on the enemy's right, and the VIII.
    0
    0
  • After the peace of Tilsit the Grand Army was gradually withdrawn behind the Rhine, leaving only three commands, totalling 63,000 men, under Davout in Prussia, Oudinot in west central Germany, and Lefebvre in Bavaria, to assist the princes of the Confederation of the Rhine in the maintenance of order and the enforcement of the French law of conscription, which was rigorously insisted on in all the States comprised in this new federation.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • By these means Davout's, Oudinot's and Lefebvre's commands were augmented, whilst in February and March new corps were formed and rapidly pushed towards the front.
    0
    0
  • At this moment Davout was entering Regensburg with his leading troops, the remainder still some marches in rear, and it was evident that the whole concentration could no longer be carried out before the Austrians would be in a position to intervene.
    0
    0
  • on the 13th of April, he ordered Davout and Oudinot to remain at Regensburg, whilst Lefebvre and Wrede (Bavarians) who had fallen back before the Austrians were directed to reoccupy Landshut.
    0
    0
  • Davout obeyed, but remonstrated.
    0
    0
  • he ordered Davout and Oudinot to withdraw at once to Ingolstadt; and Lefebvre and Wrede on the right to support the movement.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Davout, however, had left a garrison of 1800 men in Regensburg, who delayed the junction of the Austrian wings until the 10th inst., and on the same day the emperor, having now reunited his whole right wing and centre, overwhelmed the covering detachments facing him in a long series of disconnected engagements lasting forty-eight hours, and the archduke now found himself in danger of being forced back into the Danube.
    0
    0
  • Issuing orders to Davout, Oudinot and his cavalry to concentrate with all speed towards Eckmuhl, he himself rode back along the Regensburg road and reached the battle-field just as the engagement between the advance troops had commenced.
    0
    0
  • Then, leaving Davout to observe the archduke's retreat, the emperor himself rode after Massena, who with the major portion of the French army was following the Austrian weaker wing under Hiller.
    0
    0
  • Jerome was replaced by Davout, and the army resumed its march, this time in the hope of surrounding and overwhelming Barclay, whilst Davout dealt with Bagration.
    0
    0
  • Again arrangments were made for a Napoleonic battle; behind Murat's cavalry came the " general advanced guard " to attack and hold the enemy, whilst the main body and Davout were held available to swing in on his rear.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • corps of Davout only arrived upon the field after a heavy march, late on the night of December 1st.
    0
    0
  • Napoleon, on the other hand, with the exact knowledge of the powers of his men, which was the secret of his generalship, entrusted nearly half of his line of battle to a division (Legrand's) of Soult's corps, which was to be supported by Davout, some of whose brigades had marched, from Vienna, 90 m.
    0
    0
  • The contest was long and doubtful, but the Russians gradually drove back Legrand and a part of Davout's corps; numerous attacks both of infantry and cavalry were made, and by the successive arrival of reinforcements each side in turn received fresh impetus.
    0
    0
  • Finally, at about ro A.M., the allies were in possession of the villages on the Goldbach from Sokolnitz southwards, and Davout's line of battle had reformed more than a mile to rearward, still, however, maintaining touch with the French centre on the Goldbach at Kobelnitz.
    0
    0
  • The rearmost troops of the Russian 2nd column, not yet committed to the fight on the Goldbach, made a bold counter stroke against St Hilaire's right flank, but were repulsed, and Soult now turned to relieve the pressure on Davout by attacking Sokolnitz.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • After the "Chevalier Guards" had been routed by Marshal Bessieres and the Guard cavalry, the allies had no more hope of victory; orders had already been sent to Buxhbwden, who commanded the three columns engaged against Davout, to retreat on Austerlitz.
    0
    0
  • He had left Marshal Davout behind in Paris, and Murat in disgrace; Suchet was far off on the eastern frontier, and Clausel was in the south of France.
    0
    0
  • While in the Consular Guard he fought a duel with the younger brother of General Davout and was wounded.
    0
    0
  • In the early part of that campaign Jerome was entrusted with an important movement which might have brought the southern Russian army into grave danger; on his failure (which was probably due to his lack of energy) the emperor promptly subjected him to the control of Marshal Davout, and Jerome returned to Cassel.
    0
    0
  • Auxerre has statues of Marshal Davout, J.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He was still with Davout, but, concluding that he had missed an order directing him to Dornburg, he thought to conceal his error by assuming the receipt of the order evidently alluded to in the last words, and as a result he marched towards Dornburg, and his whole corps was lost to the emperor at the crisis of the next day's battle.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the Austrians had approached so near that by a single day's march it would have been possible to fall upon and crush by superior numbers either wing of the French army, but though the Austrian light cavalry successfully covered the operations of the following troops they had not yet risen to a conception of their reconnoitring mission, and the archduke, in ignorance of his opportunity and possessed, moreover, with the preconceived idea of uniting at Regensburg with the two corps coming from Bohemia, moved the bulk of his forces in that direction, leaving only a covering body against Davout altogether insufficient to retain him.
    0
    0
  • But instead of that, at the next village the sentinels of Davout's infantry corps detained him as the pickets of the vanguard had done, and an adjutant of the corps commander, who was fetched, conducted him into the village to Marshal Davout.
    0
    0
  • Davout allowed himself that pleasure when Balashev was brought in.
    0
    0
  • When he noticed in Balashev's face the disagreeable impression this reception produced, Davout raised his head and coldly asked what he wanted.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Contrary to his expectation, Davout, after hearing him, became still surlier and ruder.
    0
    0
  • "Your Emperor's orders are obeyed in your army, but here," said Davout, "you must do as you're told."
    0
    0
  • Davout took the packet and read the inscription.
    0
    0
  • Davout glanced at him silently and plainly derived pleasure from the signs of agitation and confusion which appeared on Balashev's face.
    0
    0
  • Having listened to a suggestion from Davout, who was now called Prince d'Eckmuhl, to turn the Russian left wing, Napoleon said it should not be done, without explaining why not.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Napoleon's generals--Davout, Ney, and Murat, who were near that region of fire and sometimes even entered it--repeatedly led into it huge masses of well-ordered troops.
    0
    0
  • Pierre went close up to him, but Davout, evidently consulting a paper that lay before him, did not look up.
    0
    0
  • To him Davout was not merely a French general, but a man notorious for his cruelty.
    0
    0
  • But before he had decided what to do, Davout raised his head, pushed his spectacles back on his forehead, screwed up his eyes, and looked intently at him.
    0
    0
  • "He is a Russian spy," Davout interrupted, addressing another general who was present, but whom Pierre had not noticed.
    0
    0
  • "No, monseigneur," he said, suddenly remembering that Davout was a duke.
    0
    0
  • "Your name?" asked Davout.
    0
    0
  • Davout looked up and gazed intently at him.
    0
    0
  • "How can you show me that you are telling the truth?" said Davout coldly.
    0
    0
  • "You are not what you say," returned Davout.
    0
    0
  • But at that moment an adjutant entered and reported something to Davout.
    0
    0
  • Davout brightened up at the news the adjutant brought, and began buttoning up his uniform.
    0
    0
  • He turned his head and saw that the adjutant was putting another question to Davout.
    0
    0
  • "Yes, of course!" replied Davout, but what this "yes" meant, Pierre did not know.
    0
    0
  • It was not Davout, who had looked at him in so human a way.
    0
    0
  • In another moment Davout would have realized that he was doing wrong, but just then the adjutant had come in and interrupted him.
    0
    0
  • Davout's troops, in whose charge were the prisoners, were crossing the Crimean bridge and some were already debouching into the Kaluga road.
    0
    0