Dalberg sentence example

dalberg
  • Dalberg >>
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  • DALBERG, the name of an ancient and distinguished German noble family, derived from the hamlet and castle (now in ruins) of Dalberg or Dalburg near Kreuznach in the Rhine Province.
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  • In the 14th century the original house of Dalberg became extinct in the male line, the fiefs passing to Johann Gerhard, chamberlain of the see of Worms, who married the heiress of his cousin, Anton of Dalberg, about 1330.
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  • By the close of the i 5th century the Dalberg family had grown to be of such importance that, in 1494, the German King Maximilian I.
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  • granted them the honour of being the first to receive knighthood at the coronation; this part of the ceremonies being opened by the herald asking in a loud voice "Is no Dalberg present?"
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  • (1st kein Dalberg da?).
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  • The male line of the Dalbergs is now represented only by the family of Hessloch, descended from Gerhard of Dalberg (c. 1239), which in 1809 succeeded to the title and estates in Moravia and Bohemia of the extinct counts of Ostein.
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  • Johann Von Dalberg (1445-1503), chamberlain and afterwards bishop of Worms, son of Wolfgang von Dalberg.
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  • Morneweg, Johann von Dalberg, ein deutscher Humanist and Bischof (Heidelberg, 1887).
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  • Karl Theodor Anton Maria Von Dalberg (1744-1817), archbishop-elector of Mainz, arch-chancellor of the Holy Roman Empire, and afterwards primate of the Confederation of the Rhine and grand-duke of Frankfort.
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  • Dalberg's subservience, as a prince of the Confederation, to Napoleon was specially resented since, as a priest, he had no excuse of necessity on the ground of saving family or dynastic interests; his fortunes therefore fell with those of Napoleon, and, when he died on the 10th of February 1817, of all his dignities he was in possession only of the archbishopric of Regensburg.
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  • Weak and shortsighted as a statesman, as a man and prelate Dalberg was amiable, conscientious and large-hearted.
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  • Beaulieu-Mareonnay, Karl von Dalberg and seine Zeit (Weimar, 1879).
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  • Wolfgang Heribert Von Dalberg (1750-1806), brother of the above.
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  • His chief claim to remembrance is that it was he who first put Schiller's earlier dramas on the stage, and it is to him that the poet's Briefe an den Freiherrn von Dalberg (Karlsruhe, 1819) are addressed.
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  • His brother, Johann Friedrich Hugo von Dalberg (1752-1812), canon of Trier, Worms and Spires, had some vogue as a composer and writer on musical subjects.
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  • Emmerich Joseph, Duc De Dalberg (1773-1833), Son of Baron Wolfgang Heribert.
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  • The duc de Dalberg had inherited the family property of Herrnsheim from his uncle the arch-chancellor Karl von Dalberg, and this estate passed, through his daughter and heiress, Marie Louise Pelline de Dalberg, by her marriage with Sir (Ferdinand) Richard Edward Acton, 7th baronet (who assumed the additional name of Dalberg), to her son the historian, John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton.
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  • The last elector was Karl Theodor von Dalberg.
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  • Some of those on the right bank of the river were given to Prussia and to Hesse; others were formed into a grand duchy for Dalberg.
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  • From 1806 to 1810 it was the residence of Karl von Dalberg, princeprimate of the Confederation of the Rhine, with whose dominions Frankfort had been incorporated by Napoleon.
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  • In 1807 the town and bishopric were assigned to the prince primate Dalberg, and in 1810 they were ceded to Bavaria.
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  • It formed part of the electorate of Mainz, and in 1803 was made over to the archchancellor, Archbishop Charles of Dalberg.
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  • In 1806 one of the most influential of the German clerics, Karl von Dalberg, then prince bishop of Regensburg, chose him to be his coadjutor and designated him as his successor.
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  • The town lost its independence in 1803, and passed to the princeprimate Dalberg.
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  • von Dalberg; but nothing but rebuffs and disappointments were in store for him.
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  • But it won for him the favour of Archbishop Karl Theodor Dalberg, and secured for him a professorship in the Frankfort Lyceum.
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  • 1ST BARON ACTON (JOHN EMERICH EDWARD DALBERG ACTON) (1834-1902), English historian, only son of Sir Richard Acton, 7th baronet, and grandson of the Neapolitan admiral, Sir J.
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  • represented a younger branch which had transferred itself first to France and then to Italy, but by the extinction of the elder branch the admiral became head of the family; his eldest son, Richard, had married Marie Louise Pelline, the daughter and heiress of Emerich Joseph, duc de Dalberg, a naturalized French noble of ancient German lineage who had entered the French service under Napoleon and represented Louis XVIII.
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  • He early ran away from home to avoid being set to his father's trade, and at Heidelberg was lucky enough to find a generous patron in Johann von Dalberg and a teacher in Agricola.
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  • The last elector, Karl Theodor von Dalberg, however, retained the title of archchancellor until the dissolution of the Empire in 1806.
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  • In front of the theatre are statues of Schiller, August Wilhelm Ifland the actor, and Wolfgang Heribert von Dalberg (1750-1806), intendant of the theatre in the time of Schiller.
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  • As statesman Dalberg was distinguished by his "patriotic" attitude, whether in ecclesiastical matters, in which he leaned to the Febronian view of a German national church, or in his efforts to galvanize the atrophied machinery of the Empire into some sort of effective central government of Germany.
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  • He was taken ill, however, in 1901, and died on the 19th of June 1902, being succeeded in the title by his son, Richard Maximilian Dalberg Acton, 2nd Baron Acton (b.1870).
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