This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

credit

credit

credit Sentence Examples

  • You're smarter than I give you credit for.

    274
    155
  • We won't take credit for help we can offer.

    157
    107
  • Maybe he loved his children more than she gave him credit for.

    155
    126
  • Hmm, maybe Skippy's got more brains than I give him credit for.

    92
    71
  • A woman could do all the work but somehow the man got the credit and benefit.

    85
    57
  • Everything was prepaid by credit card.

    58
    49
  • Your credit card statement captures an accurate, albeit extremely abbreviated, record of your comings and goings.

    35
    37
  • I'll give the man credit for direct eye contact as he answered.

    34
    28
  • Just give me back the credit card slip.

    33
    31
  • She replaced the necklace and handed the credit card to the salesperson.

    28
    30
  • While he trusted Dan, he couldn't help feeling that Lana was more capable of fending for herself than they gave her credit for, if only because she knew how important it was to keep the Horsemen safe.

    25
    19
  • Dusty gritted his teeth, feeling much like he was setting a child with a credit card free in a candy store.

    21
    17
  • Credit is given for deerskins also, and they were daily sold.

    21
    23
  • But to give the old man credit, he kept his cool.

    19
    17
  • But I can claim credit for saving you from ending up like the rest of them.

    19
    22
  • The shopkeeper grabbed the Valentino from Claudia, the credit card from Jackson, and bolted to the register.

    19
    22
  • I was wondering...I gave you a credit card.

    18
    17
  • It would not take much of this for businesses to no longer take credit cards.

    17
    19
  • Yes. You can take credit for curing her, if it works.

    17
    20
  • Then he stole his credit card, insurance papers and god knows what else and used 'em to get patched up in Cleveland.

    15
    14
  • "You never do give the old gentleman the credit he deserves," she smiled.

    15
    17
  • Maybe you are more like Rhyn than I gave you credit for.

    15
    18
  • Maybe the cheerful woman was right—maybe there was more to Damian than she gave him credit for.

    14
    14
  • If Shipton traced the credit card to Bird Song, why would he call to confirm she and Donnie were here?

    13
    13
  • And wisdom probably concludes, "I should not apply for this credit card."

    13
    13
  • PayPal, Square, and the online use of credit cards.

    13
    13
  • To his credit, Alex hadn't said anything about her neglect.

    13
    15
  • When we identified you, we obtained all your medical records, your credit history, basically your entire life, Kiki explained.

    13
    15
  • To her credit, the little car wasn't meant for rough country, but Katie let up on the accelerator when the car started to bog down.

    13
    15
  • Then Hunter added, "No credit card receipt either but there's a raft of places between the office and the motel and they could have stopped anywhere."

    13
    17
  • To his credit, Alex didn't visibly respond, but neither did he push her away.

    12
    15
  • She was petrified he'd follow her, by tracing her credit card receipts, so much so she'd registered under an assumed name.

    11
    13
  • There was another phone outside a gas station but it only took credit cards.

    11
    14
  • Don't give this blonde the credit for thinking too deeply.

    11
    14
  • TO MRS. LAURENCE HUTTON Wrentham, July 29, 1899. ...I passed in all the subjects I offered, and with credit in advanced Latin....

    10
    10
  • If I passed with higher credit in the preliminaries than in the finals, there are two reasons.

    10
    11
  • This has to be my favorite time of year, and the one time Lon promises not to dissect our credit card bills.

    10
    12
  • This has to be my favorite time of year, and the one time Lon promises not to dissect our credit card bills.

    10
    12
  • Betsy desperately wanted to encourage him further but to her credit, she kept her silence.

    10
    13
  • Rupert Youngblood, a thirty year old graduate student took credit for the success, claiming he located the child clairvoyantly and informed the authorities.

    9
    9
  • The day before, she'd found quite a few treasures, to include the backpack, a flashlight, the key locker for the cars in the garage, and Jake's wallet, which happened to have a credit card, which she had secretly used to book a flight from Tucson to Virginia.

    9
    11
  • I'm sure it's far more difficult to trace a credit card than it seems in the movies, even if your husband is trying that hard to find you.

    9
    11
  • She researches credit card processors and decides to go with PayPal for now.

    9
    11
  • The credit card is already recorded but I'll reverse the charge if you'd rather pay in cash.

    9
    12
  • She hadn't brought her ID for fear of being tracked and realized she also didn't have a source of credit to buy anything.

    8
    8
  • He gave his youngest brother no credit for understanding either the importance of the Council or the good intentions behind bringing the Council back together, but Rhyn knew how to use brute violence when it was needed.

    8
    10
  • If I get my credit card bill and call up and dispute a charge, the benefit of the doubt is given to me, that I am telling the truth.

    7
    8
  • There's not enough to charge him with anything, but I have to give Lydia credit; she set him up like a bowling alley.

    7
    10
  • My brother's book will give her the credit she so richly deserves.

    6
    6
  • Jackson had to give the guy a little credit; he must have a pair.

    6
    8
  • They been kinda dry lately but I've got credit too, you know.

    6
    8
  • She left the humungous bill on Quinn's credit card, perhaps with a hint of spite.

    6
    9
  • It does great credit, not only to you, but to your instructors, who have so broken down the walls that seemed to shut you in that now your outlook seems more bright and cheerful than that of many seeing and hearing children.

    6
    10
  • With each passing hour, the hope that my wife and young Molly were alive diminished but to give credit where due, the searchers never let up in their fervor.

    5
    5
  • I am fascinated by credit cards and the fact that the entire free enterprise system relies on the honesty of almost all people.

    5
    6
  • His childishly rash, uncalled-for, and ignoble departure from Africa, leaving his comrades in distress, is set down to his credit, and again the enemy's fleet twice lets him slip past.

    5
    6
  • The credit card processor wasn't alerted?

    5
    7
  • Sofia fingered the cell phone and credit card Damian thrust into her hands on her way out the door.

    5
    7
  • We just took her word for the fact he chased down the credit card charge so quickly.

    5
    7
  • "You don't give yourself enough credit, Elise," Lana chided.

    5
    7
  • "You don't give yourself enough credit, Elise," Lana chided.

    5
    7
  • Besides, she signed the register as 'Edith Jones' but her credit card said 'Edith Shipton.'

    5
    8
  • "I can't take all the credit," Fred added with smug modesty.

    5
    8
  • Visa, he was happy to learn, didn't call to say he was overdrawn but to offer to increase his credit limit.

    5
    9
  • Credit cards are able to work and charge low fees because almost all transactions are honest.

    4
    5
  • She just checked in, used one name to register and another name on the credit charge for the room.

    4
    6
  • She tried to change the credit card charge to cash later when it dawned on her the guy might be able to trace it.

    4
    6
  • So why did he pay cash if he had a pocket full of credit cards?

    4
    6
  • If Byrne was out to set up an identity he'd apply for credit cards, a driver's license, a library card and stuff like that.

    4
    6
  • I even checked out some of the banks, figuring credit cards would be most important.

    4
    6
  • Two hundred years later, William Rutherford thought he had calculated it to 208 digits but only got the first 152 correct, so we will give him credit that far.

    4
    6
  • But give credit where credit is due: For certain tasks, machines perform vastly better than humans.

    4
    6
  • It is not to our discredit that machines can perform calculations so wondrously fast; rather it is to our credit that we conceived of and built such machines.

    4
    6
  • I beg your Highness to credit what he says to you, especially when he expresses the sentiment of esteem and special regard I have long entertained for your person.

    4
    6
  • He recounted unsuccessful calls to banks, credit bureaus and public bodies but refrained from eliciting Dean's help in these activities, nor did he seek any guidance.

    4
    8
  • Menu prices are inexpensive and the restaurant takes most major credit cards.

    3
    2
  • Don't forget to bring cash since it doesn't accept credit cards or checks.

    2
    1
  • They accept credit cards but don't expect fast service.

    2
    1
  • Sally's is open for dinner only and doesn't accept credit cards.

    2
    1
  • Maximum initial credit limit of £ 5,000 for Classic cardholders; £ 10,000 for Gold cardholders & £ 15,000 for platinum cardholders.

    1
    0
  • Remember to bring cash; this restaurant does not accept credit cards.

    1
    2
  • Credit cards are accepted but reservations are not at this restaurant.

    1
    2
  • Give us some credit.

    0
    0
  • After all, we were after a villain who had multiple killings to his credit.

    0
    0
  • He was treated overnight and paid with his insurance card and for good measure, his credit card.

    0
    0
  • Give Fred some credit.

    0
    0
  • Dean had to give Cynthia credit.

    0
    0
  • Well, I give you a lot of credit.

    0
    0
  • But you had to give him credit.

    0
    0
  • "Before Jonathan-on-the-spot Winston showed up, with his gun blazing," Dean said, as much to change the subject as give the FBI credit.

    0
    0
  • None of which she was giving him credit for at the moment.

    0
    0
  • No, only Josh could claim credit for that.

    0
    0
  • Plucking it free, he Traveled back to Texas to find the stash of credit cards and identifications Damian kept in the safe in his study.

    0
    0
  • To her credit, Jenn remained in her seat.

    0
    0
  • Taran had never wanted to give the princeling any credit for doing good.

    0
    0
  • To her credit, she wasn't clairvoyant, but she should have had more faith in him.

    0
    0
  • His father knew a lot more than Alex was giving him credit for, and likely so did Gerald.

    0
    0
  • It had grown so slowly that he hadn't noticed how busy she was – nor had he given her any credit.

    0
    0
  • She rarely carried much cash and only one credit card.

    0
    0
  • He had done so at considerable risk to himself and deserved the credit.

    0
    0
  • To her credit, she was bright enough to keep around.

    0
    0
  • To his credit, he had yet to break the agreement he made with them about vamping girls and had returned all but one trainee alive.

    0
    0
  • Xander's comments about her rear end did nothing to help, though she gave him credit for trying.

    0
    0
  • As a psychologist de Tracy deserves credit for his distinction between active and passive touch, which developed into the theory of the muscular sense.

    0
    0
  • His fatal optimism rendered him largely responsible for the collapse of Egyptian credit which brought about the fall of Ismail.

    0
    0
  • Garfield himself was accused of corruption in connexion with the Credit Mobilier scandal, but the charge was never proved.

    0
    0
  • A Republican convention in his district demanded his resignation, and re-election seemed impossible; but he defended himself in two pamphlets, "Increase of Salaries" and "Review of the Transactions of the Credit Mobilier Company," made a village-to-village canvass, and was victorious.

    0
    0
  • The legislature of the latter state in 1873 adopted a report declaring that between 1822 and 1861, during which period the debt had been incurred, the western counties had paid an excess of taxes, more than equal to the amount which had been expended in the west for the purposes for which the debt had been incurred, and concluded with the statement: " West Virginia owes no debt, has no bonds for sale and asks no credit."

    0
    0
  • country gentleman with equal credit.

    0
    0
  • Agricultural credit operations in Sardinia are carried on by the Bank of Italy, which, however, displays such caution that its action is almost imperceptible.

    0
    0
  • An agricultural loan and credit company has been formed on the ruins of the former institutions, but hitherto no charter has been granted it.

    0
    0
  • This, however, tended to raise his credit with the king.

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, on his recovery, much to his credit, he overlooked it, and they continued to direct affairs for six years longer.

    0
    0
  • The scandals of the bowling alleys grew rampant in Elizabethan London, and Stephen Gosson in his School of Abuse (1579) says, "Common bowling alleys are privy moths that eat up the credit of many idle citizens; whose gains at home are not able to weigh down their losses abroad; whose shops are so far from maintaining their play, that their wives and children cry out for bread, and go to bed supperless often in the year."

    0
    0
  • This act, which was only decided upon after much hesitation, had a most deleterious effect upon the national credit.

    0
    0
  • The public credit was pledged at home and abroad to fill the pockets of the adventurers, and the wildest excesses were committed under the guise of administrative acts.

    0
    0
  • Through the rapid depreciation of Argentine credit, the great firm of Baring Brothers, the financial agents of the government in London, became so heavily involved that they were forced into liquidation, November 1890.

    0
    0
  • This proof of the desire of the Argentine government to meet honestly all its obligations did much to restore its credit abroad.

    0
    0
  • In view of these considerations it becomes difficult to credit the number of the vessels that is assigned to them by Herodotus (30 as against 180 Athenian vessels, cf.

    0
    0
  • Credit became greatly restricted, and all descriptions of speculative enterprise came to an end.

    0
    0
  • The marshal wrote to Mathieu de Lesseps on the 18th of December 1830: "I have had the pleasure of meeting your son, who gives promise of sustaining with great credit the name he bears."

    0
    0
  • To Cromwell more than to any other British ruler belongs the credit of having laid the foundation of England's maritime supremacy and of her over-sea empire.

    0
    0
  • Cromwell shares with Frederick the Great the credit of founding the modern cavalry spirit.

    0
    0
  • Credit, if given, was treated as a debt, and secured as a loan by the seller to be repaid by the buyer, for which he gave a bond.

    0
    0
  • Savings Bank and the ordinary savings banks, many co-operative credit societies and ordinary credit banks receive deposits of savings.

    0
    0
  • Co-operation, for the various purposes of credit, distribution, production and labor, has attained great development in Italy.

    0
    0
  • Co-o ra- Credit co-operation is represented by a special type of association known as Peoples Banks (Banche Popolari).

    0
    0
  • A recent form of co-operative credit banks are the Casse Rurali or rural banks, on the Raffeisen system, which lend money to peasants and small proprietors out of capital obtained on credit or by gift.

    0
    0
  • In 188o the number of charitable institutions (exclusive of public pawnshops, or Monti di Piet, and other institutions which combine operations of credit with charity) was approximately 22,000, with an aggregate patrimony of nearly 80,000,000.

    0
    0
  • An annuity equal to the ascertained revenue of the suppressed institutions was placed to the credit of the fund in the government 5% consols.

    0
    0
  • On the 30th of June 1903 the balance-sheet of this fund showed a credit amounting to 1,796,120 and a debit of 460,819.

    0
    0
  • At that time four limited companies were authorized to issue bank notes, namely, the National Bank, the National Bank of Tuscany, the Roman Bank and the Tuscan Credit Bank; and two banking corporations, the Bank of Naples and the Bank of Sicily.

    0
    0
  • Ordinary credit operations are also carried on by the co-operative credit societies, of which there are some 700.

    0
    0
  • Loans are repayable by Agrarian instalments, and are guaranteed by first mortgages not Credit greater in amount than half the value of the hypothecated flanks property.

    0
    0
  • Various laws have been passed to facilitate agrarian credit.

    0
    0
  • Agrarian credit banks may, with the permission of the government, issue cartelle agrarie, or agrarian bonds, repayable by instalments and bearing interest.

    0
    0
  • By sheer force of will he compelled the Chamber early in 1873 to adopt some minor financial reforms, but on the 29th of April found himself in a minority on the question of a credit for a proposed state arsenal at Taranto.

    0
    0
  • It left out of account a sum of 1,000,000 for railway construction which was covered by credit, but, on the other hand, took no note of 360,000 expended in the redemption of debt.

    0
    0
  • As an opposition party the Left had lived upon the, facile credit of political promises, but had no well-considered programme nor other discipline nor unity of purpose than that born of the common eagerness of its leaders for office and their common hostility to the Right.

    0
    0
  • Minghetti, in a trenchant exposure of the parliamentary condition of Italy during this period, cites a case in which a credit for certain public works was, during a debate in the Chamber, increased by the government from 6,600,000 to 9,000,000 in order to conciliate local political interests.

    0
    0
  • eager for revenge, voted a credit of 200,000, and sanctioned the despatch of reinforcements.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile Signor Crispi, who, though averse from colonial adventure, desired to vindicate Italian honor, entered the Depretis cabinet as minister of the interior, and obtained from parliament a new credit of 800,000.

    0
    0
  • Fear of extending still farther a scandal which had already attained huge dimensions, and the desire to avoid any further shock to national credit, convinced the commissioners of the expediency of avoiding a long series of prosecutions.

    0
    0
  • While engagements contracted by Depretis in regard to public works had more than ~n1anciaj neutralized the normal increase of revenue from taxation, the whole credit of the state had been affected by the severe economic and financial crises of the years 1889-1893.

    0
    0
  • The Franco-Italian understanding had the effect of raising Italys credit, and the Italian rente, which had been shut out of the French bourses, resumed its place there once more, a fact which contributed to increase its price and to reduce the unfavourable rate of exchange.

    0
    0
  • He desired to increase English trade, credit and power abroad.

    0
    0
  • In estimating the influence of recent writers on geography it is usual tc assign to Oscar Peschel (1826-1875) the credit of having corrected the preponderance which Ritter gave to the historical element, and of restoring physical geography to its old pre-eminence.2 As a matter of fact, each of the leading modern exponents of theoretical geography - such as Ferdinand von Richthofen, Hermann Wagner, Friedrich Ratzel, William M.

    0
    0
  • In this he greatly distinguished himself, and claimed the credit of having terminated the war by capturing Jugurtha himself.

    0
    0
  • But along with these cruel and unjust measures there must be put down to Torquemada's credit some advanced ideas a s s to prison life.

    0
    0
  • Nor could Shakespeare have failed to bring out with greater variety and distinctness the dramatic features in Henry VII., whom Ford depicts with sufficient distinctness to give some degree of individuality to the figure, but still with a tenderness of touch which would have been much to the credit of the dramatist's skill had he been writing in the Tudor age.

    0
    0
  • want of technical instruction and of capital, and the existence of vexatious regulations, aggravated by the disturbed condition of the country, which hinder credit, confidence and enterprise, are amongst the chief reasons for this.

    0
    0
  • Throughout he was practical and steadfast, and he deserved credit for maintaining his principles as a constitutional ruler.

    0
    0
  • It has succeeded in restoring the credit of these enterprises, and is proceeding with care and skill to form the lines into an efficient transportation system.

    0
    0
  • In regions where capital was lacking eagerness for railway facilities led the people to demand the direct co-operation of the state, and many projects, most of which ended in disaster, were undertaken either by the state itself or through the aid of the state's credit.

    0
    0
  • The unfortunate results of this policy led many of the states, from about 1850, to put constitutional limitations upon the power of their legislatures to lend the state's credit or to involve the state as stockholder in the affairs of any corporation.

    0
    0
  • From a commercial point of view such ventures are differentiated from railway projects built for general commercial reasons because they do not depend on their own credit.

    0
    0
  • Where a railway is built for general commercial reasons, however, it must furnish its own credit; that is to say, it must convince investors that it can be worked profitably and give them an assured return on the funds they advance.

    0
    0
  • Thus he devoted some attention to the quadrature of surfaces and the cubature of solids, which he accomplished, in some of the simpler cases, by an original method which he called the "Method of Indivisibles"; but he lost much of the credit of the discovery as he kept his method for his own use,while Bonaventura Cavalieri published a similar method which he himself had invented.

    0
    0
  • He had the credit of being the first to explain the process of etherification and to elucidate the formation of ether by the interaction of sulphuric acid and alcohol.

    0
    0
  • Fallopius, who gave them credit for the cure of his own deafness, sounded their praises in 1569; and they have been more or less in fashion since.

    0
    0
  • To Archbishop Theodore is usually ascribed the credit of ending the difference in the rest of England in 669.

    0
    0
  • Taxes were increased - expenditure increased nearly threefold between 1869 and 1871 - and there was some official corruption; but the state escaped the heavy burden of debt imposed upon its neighbours, partly because of the higher character of its reconstruction governors, and partly because its credit was already impaired by the repudiation of obligations contracted before the war.

    0
    0
  • enforce the acts of trade and navigation and by the parliamentary statute of 1764 forbidding the issue of bills of credit; and the Scotch-Irish among them in particular were aroused by the repeal of an act of 1771 allowing Presbyterian ministers to perform the marriage ceremony and of another act of the same year for the establishment of Queen's College in Mecklenburg county for Presbyterians.

    0
    0
  • His results were published in his Anfangsgriinden der Stochiometrie oder Messkunst chemischer Elemente (1792-94), and Ober die neueren Gegenstande in der Chemie (1792-1802), but it was long before they were properly appreciated, or he himself was accorded due credit for them.

    0
    0
  • In the following June he was transferred to the office of secretary of state for foreign affairs, and having acquitted himself with credit with regard to the war between Russia and Turkey, and to affairs in Greece, Portugal and France, he resigned with Wellington in November 1830, and shared his leader's attitude towards the Reform Bill of 1832.

    0
    0
  • With such sentiments, it is no wonder that he approved of the vigorous conduct of Francois Claude Amour, marquis de Bouille, at Nancy, which was the more to his credit as Bourne was the one hope of the court influences opposed to him.

    0
    0
  • During the Revolution he received yet more help; men were proud to labour for him, and did not murmur because he absorbed all the credit and fame.

    0
    0
  • If Genovesi does not take a high rank in philosophy, he deserves the credit of having introduced the new order of ideas into Italy, at the same time preserving a just mean between the two extremes of sensualism and idealism.

    0
    0
  • Turgot's measures succeeded in considerably reducing the deficit, and raised the national credit to such an extent that in 1776, just before his fall, he was able to negotiate a loan with some Dutch bankers at 4%; but the deficit was still so large as to prevent him from attempting at once to realize his favourite scheme of substituting for indirect taxation a single tax on land.

    0
    0
  • In 1797 the fear of foreign invasion led to a panic and run upon the banks, in which emergency the Bank Restriction Act, suspending cash payment, was passed, and ushered in a system of unlimited credit transactions.

    0
    0
  • The details of the day, memorable in the history of war as well as of Scotland, have been singularly well preserved, and redound to the credit of Bruce, who had studied in the school of Wallace as well as in that of Edward I.

    0
    0
  • In the meantime they won credit by popular measures such as the abolition of forced loans and of the objectionable habit of seizing hostages from the districts of the west where the royalist ferment was still strongly working.

    0
    0
  • He endeavoured to please Queen Caroline, who loved literature, and he has the credit, on good grounds, of having paid the expenses of the first handsome edition of Don Quixote to please her.

    0
    0
  • Charles lingered on in Turkey fifteen months longer, in the hope of obtaining a cavalry escort sufficiently strong to enable him to restore his credit in Poland.

    0
    0
  • Sharpe's 1 On the title-page credit is given to the latter alone, but only two-thirds of the plates (from pl.

    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding this, to Gloger seems to belong the credit of being the first author to avail himself in a book intended for practical ornithologists of the new light that had already been shed on Systematic Ornithology; and accordingly we have the second order of his arrangement, the A y es Passerinae, divided into two suborders: singing passerines (melodusae), and passerines without an apparatus of song-muscles (anomalae) - the latter including what some later writers called Picariae.

    0
    0
  • Aulus was consul in 48, and (perhaps in 60-61) proconsul (governor) of Africa, in which capacity he is said to have acquitted himself with credit.

    0
    0
  • Cotton dealers up to this time had regularly financed the spinners, who were frequently men of little capital, by allowing long credit, and had even employed them to spin on commission.

    0
    0
  • Dealers pass their debit and credit vouchers into the Cotton Bank and pay or receive the balances which they owe or are entitled to.

    0
    0
  • He enjoyed the credit of sharing largely in the establishment of the new order of things, of reconciling parties, and of carrying the new empire safely through many dangers.

    0
    0
  • Of all the men who took part in the opposition to the excise, Gallatin alone came out with credit.

    0
    0
  • Athenaeus quotes Epicrates as stating that he was a Platonist, but other accounts credit him with having preferred Stilpo to Plato.

    0
    0
  • In 1800 he won great credit both by his exertions in bringing the artillery of the Army of Reserve over the Alps and by his handling of guns in the battle of Marengo.

    0
    0
  • C. Marignac, to whom is due the credit of first showing the true chemical relations of these elements.

    0
    0
  • The credit of having returned to the scientific principles innovated by Eratosthenes and Hipparchus is due to Marinus of Tyre (c. A.D.

    0
    0
  • In this work the British hydrographic office may justly claim the credit of having contributed the chief share.

    0
    0
  • He gained great credit when the yellow fever devastated Philadelphia, in 1793, by his assiduity in visiting the sick, and by his bold and apparently successful treatment of the disease by bloodletting.

    0
    0
  • To Grabe, Schnapp and Conybeare belongs the credit of showing that the Christian elements were interpolations - to Conybeare especially of the three, since, whereas the two others showed the high probability of their contention on internal evidence, Conybeare proved by means of the Armenian Version that when it was made many of the interpolations had not yet found their way into the text.

    0
    0
  • There is a national bank in Serajevo, which carries on a hypothecary credit business and manages the wholesale trade of the tobacco factories.

    0
    0
  • It is explained in the preface to the budget - that one of the abuses of the previous regime had been to obtain advances from credit establishments at high rates of interest varying from 7% to 9%, when it was found impossible to issue a public loan.

    0
    0
  • In the years1908-1909the advances were reduced by ET688,000, in addition to repayments allowed for in the budget, and the credit agreed for the year1909-1910is ET663,000, as compared with £Ti,160,000 for the previous year.

    0
    0
  • A credit of £T17,124 is allowed for the central accounts department.

    0
    0
  • Indirect contributions, or more familiarly " customs," are allowed a credit of £T512,670.

    0
    0
  • Posts and telegraphs, which absorbed a credit of ET782,839 in 1910-191 I, have also long been in urgent need of extension and better administration.

    0
    0
  • An additional credit of ET90,000 was granted, as compared with the previous year, and increased expenditure was foreshadowed for the future; on the other hand, it was confidently expected that the post office receipts would increase in far more rapid ratio than the expenditure.

    0
    0
  • The official budget shows a credit for admiralty expenditure of £TI,000,327, which is apparently less than that for the previous year by some ET220,000.

    0
    0
  • Of the sums really received the ministry of finance expended some £T3,000,000, in payment of the Greek indemnity, in repayment of £Ti,000,000 of advances to the treasury and by assigning the credit voted to the ordnance department, and it was stated that these payments exhausted the extraordinary resources.

    0
    0
  • After the war with Russia, in order to obtain credit from the Imperial Ottoman Bank and local financiers, who refused any further accommodation unless their previous and further advances were amply secured, revenues known as the " six indirect contributions " were handed over to a committee of local bankers (by decree of Nov.

    0
    0
  • A reserve fund was created of which the nucleus was the sum already standing to the credit of the " Reserve fund for increasing the rate of interest " (£TI,113,865), plus £T300,000 at least in cash by the issue of sufficient unified bonds to produce that amount and the sum of £T150,000 to be paid by the government to the public debt at the rate of £T15,000 per annum.

    0
    0
  • Other banks doing business in Constantinople are the Deutsche Bank, the Deutsche-Orient Bank, the Credit Lyonnais, the Wiener Bank-Vcrein, the Russian Bank for Commerce and Industry, the Bank of Mitylene, the Bank of Salonica and the Bank of Athens.

    0
    0
  • Adrianople, small change is often supplemented by cardboard tickets, metal discs, &c., put into circulation by private establishments or individuals of good credit.

    0
    0
  • They are the bankers of the country, and it is through their communications that the traveller is able to obtain credit.

    0
    0
  • His own mind, heart and life were undoubtedly pervaded, sustained and ruled by the feelings, convictions and hopes which he formulated in these three articles; and he rationalized his own religious conceptions in a number of expositions which do credit to his sincerity and courage.

    0
    0
  • The industry declined in the 18th century, and in 1740 we find the woollen merchants of Bradford petitioning for an act of parliament to improve their trade and so re-establish their credit in foreign markets.

    0
    0
  • The credit of the realization is due, in the first place, to the tsar of Russia, who initiated the Hague Conference of 1899, and, in the second place to Lord Pauncefote (then Sir Julian Pauncefote, British ambassador at Washington), who urged before a committee of the conference the importance of organizing a permanent international court, the service of which should be called into requisition at will, and who also submitted an outline of the mode in which such a court might be formed.

    0
    0
  • Brazilian credit gave way under the strain, and evidences were not wanting at the beginning of 1893 that an outburst of public opinion was not far distant.

    0
    0
  • states had seriously depreciated the national credit.

    0
    0
  • The conduct of the controversy, which lasted some years, did credit to none of the contending parties, but Herculano's statement of the facts is now universally accepted as correct.

    0
    0
  • In 1903-1904 there was a slight credit balance, the figures being, revenue £4,160,145, expenditure £4,071,439.

    0
    0
  • To Matthias is also due the credit of creating an efficient official class.

    0
    0
  • The national credit was so seriously impaired abroad that foreign loans could only be obtained at ruinous rates of interest.

    0
    0
  • Himself a Calvinist, he succeeded in putting an end to the old quarrel of Catholic and Protestant and uniting them in a common enthusiasm for a race ideal; nominally a Liberal, he trampled on every Liberal principle in order to secure the means for governing with a firm hand; and if the political corruption of modern Hungary is largely his work, 4 to him also belongs the credit for the measures which have placed the country on a sound economic basis and the statesmanlike temper which made Hungary a power in the affairs of Europe.

    0
    0
  • Against this Dr Wekerle had protested, as opposed to general Hungarian opinion and ruinous to the national credit, pointing out that whenever it was a question of raising a loan, the maintenance of the financial community between Hungary and Austria was always postulated as a preliminary condition.

    0
    0
  • Wolff, Goethe and Oken share the credit of having initiated these views, in regard especially to the structure of flowering plants and the Vertebrate skull.

    0
    0
  • He had no share in the Dardanelles defence, but took all the credit for it.

    0
    0
  • In July 1907 when the control of the finances passed into the hands of the Transvaal legislature the credit balance on the consolidated fund was £960,000.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the public credit and finances of the Transvaal went from bad to worse.

    0
    0
  • Burgers then proceeded to levy taxes, which were never paid; to enrol troops, which never marched; and to continue the head of a government which had neither resources, credit nor power of administration.

    0
    0
  • Soon, however, the credit of the estates having gone down, he withdrew to his diocese, but at the request of the bourgeois of Paris he speedily returned.

    0
    0
  • The president is assisted by a cabinet of seven ministers and the governor of the federal district, their respective departments being interior, foreign relations, finance and public credit, war and marine, fomento (promotion), public works and public instruction.

    0
    0
  • Upon resuming office he vigorously suppressed the disorders, and steadily supported the energetic remedies adopted by Sonnino, minister of finance, to save Italian credit, which had been severely shaken by the bank and financial crises of 1892-1893.

    0
    0
  • As a statesman Lamartine was placed during his brief tenure of office in a position from which it would have been almost impossible for any man, who was not prepared and able to play the dictator, to emerge with credit.

    0
    0
  • Although the evacuation of Helles without appreciable loss in personnel reflected great credit on the British staff and the troops concerned in it, as also on the Royal Navy, whose work at the beaches was carried out under great difficulties, the escape of the final remnants of the Dardanelles army from the Gallipoli Peninsula was facilitated by the negligence of the troops opposed to them.

    0
    0
  • The fact that in Upper Burma the proportion of literates is nearly as high as, and the proportion of those under instruction even higher than, that of the corresponding classes in Lower Burma, is a clear proof that in primary education, at least, the credit for the superiority of the Burman over the native of India is due to indigenous schools.

    0
    0
  • The credit of having been the first to divine this importance of the Hittites should always be ascribed to Sayce.

    0
    0
  • of England repudiated the heavy debts contracted for his wars in France with the Florentine banking houses of Bardi and Peruzzi (1339), which eventually led to their failure and to that of many smaller firms, and shook Florentine credit all over the world; Philip VI.

    0
    0
  • and the Florentines were defeated several times, with the result that their credit was shaken and several important firms failed.

    0
    0
  • At the same time the conditions of the city were not prosperous; its resources were strained by the sums paid to Charles and by the war; its credit was shaken, its trade paralysed, famine and plague visited the city, and the war to subjugate Pisa was proceeding unsatisfactorily.

    0
    0
  • He endeavoured to support his failing credit by a secret alliance with the grand-duchess Catherine, whom he proposed to raise to the throne instead of her Holstein husband, Peter, from whom Bestuzhev expected nothing good either for himself or for Russia.

    0
    0
  • He consistently contended for a sound financial system, and vigorously opposed the operations of the "Land Bank" and the issue of pernicious bills of credit.

    0
    0
  • Odoric's credit was not benefited by the, liberties which Sir John Mandeville took with it.

    0
    0
  • To Gesenius belongs in a large measure the credit of having freed Semitic philology from the trammels of theological and religious prepossession, and of inaugurating the strictly scientific (and comparative) method which has since been so fruitful.

    0
    0
  • Mr Bates, like Mr Wiriwood Reade, refused to credit du Chaillu's account of his having killed gorillas, and stated that the only instance he knew of one of these animals being slain by a European was an old male (now in Mr Walter Rothschild's museum at Tring) shot by the German trader Paschen in the Yaunde district, of which an illustrated account was published in 1901.

    0
    0
  • If we could confidently credit him with the authorship of the epistle to the Hebrews, we could conceive his theological standpoint more exactly.

    0
    0
  • The writer, therefore, exercises no independent criticism except as regards the choice of authorities; for he rejects accounts of which the first author or one of the intermediate links seems to him unworthy of credit, and sometimes he states which of several accounts seems to him the best.

    0
    0
  • It was forbidden to admit an outsider to partnership or to co-ownership of ships, to trade in non-Hanseatic goods, to buy or sell on credit in a foreign mart or to enter into contracts for future delivery.

    0
    0
  • That Roger Bacon was acquainted with the principle of the camera obscura is shown by his attempt at solving Aristotle's problem stated above, in the treatise De Speculis, and also from his references to Alhazen's experiments of the same kind, but although Dr John Freind, in his History of Physick, has given him the credit of the invention on the strength of a passage in the Perspectiva, there is nothing to show that he constructed any instrument of the kind.

    0
    0
  • His only novelty was the use of it as a peep-show; his descriptions of it are vague, but being published in a book of general reference, which became popular, he acquired credit for the invention.

    0
    0
  • Halleck with the command of a large force to clear the lower reaches of the Cumberland and the Tennessee, and, whatever criticism may be passed on the general strategy of the campaign, Grant himself, by his able and energetic work, thoroughly deserved the credit of his brilliant success of Fort Donelson, where 15,000 Confederates were forced to capitulate.

    0
    0
  • Two victories (Iuka and Corinth) were won in the autumn of 1862, but the credit of both fell to Rosecrans, who commanded in the field, and the nadir of Grant's military fortunes was reached when the first advance on Vicksburg, planned on an unsound basis, and complicated by a series of political intrigues (which had also caused the adoption of the original scheme), collapsed after the minor reverses of Holly Springs and Chickasaw Bayou (December 1862).

    0
    0
  • The passage of the Resumption Act in January 1875 was largely due to his consistent advocacy, and for these measures he deserves as high credit as for his victories in the field.

    0
    0
  • Deluc, were able to claim the credit of his results.

    0
    0
  • Not one useful measure can be placed to his credit; and it was by a fortunate accident that he found, in Hubert Walter, an administrator who had the skill to mitigate the consequences of a reckless fiscal policy.

    0
    0
  • A friend had said to him, " You talk too freely, your ideas are getting abroad, and other people use them without giving you the credit; put your ownership on record."

    0
    0
  • If unity of career, then, means that Comte, from the beginning designed the institution of a spiritual power, and the systematic reorganization of life, it is difficult to deny him whatever credit that unity may be worth, and the credit is perhaps not particularly great.

    0
    0
  • A design is drawn by the artist, to whom the whole credit of the production generally belongs, with a brush on thin paper, which is then pasted face downwards on the block.

    0
    0
  • The credit of the invention is also given to Toni Kiyonobu, who worked at about this time, and, indeed, is said to have made the prints above mentioned.

    0
    0
  • To Kawamoto Hansuke, who flourished about 1830-1845, belongs the credit of having turned out the richest and most attractive ware of this class.

    0
    0
  • For many years their ware enjoyed the credit, or discredit, of being the most lavishly deco- Wa,i-~ I rated porcelain in Japan.

    0
    0
  • The measures adopted to redeem the country's credit were successful, but they imposed much hardship on the people and a rising took place which was only quelled by the aid of troops from electoral Saxony.

    0
    0
  • The great French chemist, Dumas, gives him the credit for the first attempt to establish a system of crystallography.

    0
    0
  • Evidence may be sought in vain to connect William with the outrage, but since he lavishly rewarded its leaders and promoters this circumstance is not very much to his credit.

    0
    0
  • But in general his domestic policy was not very fortunate, and he can hardly claim any personal credit for the reassessment of the land-tax (1692), the creation of the national debt or the recoinage act (1693-1695).

    0
    0
  • But the manner of the peacemaking, which had been carried on by a series of underhand conspiracies with the enemy instead of by open conferences with the allies, and was characterized throughout by a violation of the most solemn international assurances, left a deep and lasting stain upon the national honour and credit; and not less dishonourable was the abandonment of the Catalans by the treaty.

    0
    0
  • In March 1711, by Guiscard's attempt on his life, Harley got the wound which had been intended for St John, with all the credit.

    0
    0
  • After serving as instructor in mathematics to the young prince Louis, he took part with credit in the expedition into Holland, and was given the order Pour le merite.

    0
    0
  • In the work of expanding and elaborating this theme the successors of Geoffrey went as far beyond him as he had gone beyond Nennius; but he retains the credit due to the founder of a great school.

    0
    0
  • Forced against his will into interference in Spain by Mathieu de Montmorency and Chateaubriand, he contrived to reap some credit for the monarchy from the successful campaign of 1823.

    0
    0
  • The credit of first discerning the true significance of the Montanistic movement belongs to Ritschl.'

    0
    0
  • Israel, and to amplify everything which redounded to their credit.

    0
    0
  • During the political campaign of 1872 he was accused, with other prominent politicians, of being implicated in corrupt transactions with the Credit Mobilier, and a congressional investigation brought out the fact that he had agreed to take twenty shares from this concern, and had received dividends amounting to $1200.

    0
    0
  • It reflects the greatest credit on the strict and almost punctilious conscientiousness of the governor, and on the assiduity and the high principle which animated the emperor.

    0
    0
  • In March 1907 there were 8159 depositors in the government savings bank, with £569,731 to their credit.

    0
    0
  • A Chinese emperor has the credit of burning "the books" extant in his day (about 220 B.C.), and of burying alive the scholars who were acquainted with them.

    0
    0
  • In Germany the credit of the French successes was due to Crequi, who was no longer the defeated general of Conzer Briicke, but the most successful of Turenne's pupils.

    0
    0
  • He had some reputation as a skilful disputant, excelled in mathematics, and gained some credit as a writer of verses.

    0
    0
  • of Spain to the Conventa dos Jeronymos in Lisbon, many Portuguese refused to credit his death.

    0
    0
  • In bookkeeping, in such expressions as "petty cash," "cash-book," and the like, it has the same significance, and so also in "cash-payment" or ready-money payment as opposed to "credit," however the payment may be made, by coin, notes or cheque.

    0
    0
  • The system does away with credit or the delay and inconvenience of paying in advance.

    0
    0
  • It is not to the credit of historians that Schopenhauer's debt should have been allowed to pass with so little notice.

    0
    0
  • His affairs were wound up in 1836, and next year he created a credit bank, which prospered as long as he lived, but failed in 1848.

    0
    0
  • Keith had repeatedly promised to send a letter of credit by the ship on which Franklin sailed, but when the Channel was reached and the ship's mails were examined no such letter was found.

    0
    0
  • In spite of the poor condition in Europe of the credit of the struggling colonies, and of the fact that France was almost bankrupt (and in the later years was at war), and although Necker strenuously resisted the making of any loans to the colonies, France, largely because of Franklin's appeals, expended, by loan or gift to the colonies, or in sustenance of the French arms in America, a sum estimated at $60,000,000.

    0
    0
  • A curious discussion arose in the Dutch states-general when the government was seeking legislative sanction for the above measures, with a provisional credit to cover the first establishment expenses.

    0
    0
  • The higher clergy deserted the council of Basel, and left matters in the hands of the lower clergy, who chose an anti-pope; but the rump council gradually lost credit and its lingering members were finally dispersed.

    0
    0
  • The Protestants have sometimes taken credit to themselves for the indubitable reforms in the Roman Catholic Church, which by the end of the 16th century had done away with many of the crying abuses against which councils and diets had so long been protesting.

    0
    0
  • It cost about $20,000,000, the state lending its credit, and was built between 1855 and 1874.

    0
    0
  • He was also zealous for the reform of the church, and particularly for the reform of the monasteries; and it is greatly to his credit that he did not avail himself of the extremely favourable opportunities he possessed of becoming a pluralist.

    0
    0
  • The Elswick works were originally founded for the manufacture of this hydraulic machinery, but it was not long before they became the birthplace of a revolution in gunmaking; indeed, could nothing more be placed to Armstrong's credit than their establishment, his name would still be worthy of remembrance.

    0
    0
  • It is to his credit that he did not yield to this temptation.

    0
    0
  • Gneisenau apparently selected Wavre, not with the intention of assisting his ally, but rather to re-establish his own line of communication, and the presence of the Prussians on the field of battle of Waterloo must be put down to the immortal credit of Blucher and Grolmann, his quartermaster-general.

    0
    0
  • His patrons withdrew from him, and his chance of perhaps becoming professor was gone; d'Orville indeed soon came round, for he could not do without Reiske, who did work of which his patron, after dressing it up in his own style, took the credit.

    0
    0
  • His part in Jourdan's great victory at Wattignies was so important that the credit of the day has often been assigned to Carnot.

    0
    0
  • Of Sabine's scientific work two branches in particular deserve very high credit - his determination of the length of the second's pendulum, and his extensive researches connected with terrestrial magnetism.

    0
    0
  • For several years he was compelled to play a passive part, having lost all credit.

    0
    0
  • The constitution prohibits the legislature from lending the state's credit or incurring an indebtedness for current expenses in excess of $1,000,000 or incurring any indebtedness whatever, other than for war purposes, unless such indebtedness be authorized by law for " some single work or object," the law to be approved by the people at a general election and providing for a direct annual tax sufficient to pay the interest and to liquidate the debt within eighteen years.

    0
    0
  • That instrument further prohibits each county, city, town and village from lending its credit and from creating an indebtedness in excess of 10% of the assessed valuation of its real estate.

    0
    0
  • At the same date more than £ 10,000,000 stood to the credit of small depositors in post office and private savings banks, nine-tenths in the former.

    0
    0
  • Over 13,000 souls had been settled in this area, and the yearly rent received from them, about £ 220,000, left a substantial balance to the credit of the enterprise in the books of the treasury.

    0
    0
  • He became a brigadiergeneral of volunteers in September 1861, led a brigade of the Army of the Potomac with credit up to the battle of Antietam, and then succeeded to a divisional command.

    0
    0
  • One thing at least is certain with regard to the diamond fields - they were the means of restoring the credit and prosperity of the Free State.

    0
    0
  • Public credit was restored.

    0
    0
  • Procuring their type on credit, they opened a small office, and undertook the.

    0
    0
  • Mlle de Gournay thereupon set to work to produce a new and final edition with a zeal and energy which would have done credit to any editor of any date.

    0
    0
  • While Saxony's political liberty was thus enlarged, its commerce and credit were stimulated by its adhesion to the Prussian Zollverein and by the construction of railways.

    0
    0
  • The credit for the success of the Conway and Britannia bridges must be divided between the engineers, Robert Stephenson and William Fairbairn, and used for railway bridges in England after the construction of the Conway and Menai bridges, and it was in the discussions arising during their design that the proper function of the vertical web between the top and bottom flanges of a girder first came to be understood.

    0
    0
  • In addition, numerous other researches stand to Joule's credit - the work done in compressing gases and the thermal changes they undergo when forced under pressure through small apertures (with Lord Kelvin), the change of volume on solution, the change of temperature produced by the longitudinal extension and compression of solids, &c. It was during the experiments involved by the first of these inquiries that Joule was incidentally led to appreciate the value of surface condensation in increasing the efficiency of the steam engine.

    0
    0
  • Its first steps in war economy were confined to the sphere of finance and credit: the bourse was closed, and a moratorium announced.

    0
    0
  • The new institution was registered as a trader and was to be conducted on commercial principles, its expenses being covered by its receipts, and the State only guaranteeing it against eventual loss in order to secure the credit of the company.

    0
    0
  • 3 1914 to 41%, and finally on March 12 1914 to 4 These changes in the bank-rate show that Austria passed through a financial crisis and credit difficulties in 1912-3, from the consequences of which she had only just recovered at the outbreak of the war.

    0
    0
  • The legal forms under which this source of credit was assured were various, but the actual result was in every case the same.

    0
    0
  • 20 1914, and the granting of credit on depositing securities was facilitated by extending the limits of the securities accepted.

    0
    0
  • The means of carrying on the war were obtained by the State becoming the debtor of the Austro-Hungarian Bank, in so far as credit was concerned.

    0
    0
  • Foreign credit also was laid under contribution by the Austrian State.

    0
    0
  • To Arnold Toynbee may be given the credit of leading the way in this direction, and the Hall which Canon Barnett established (in 1885) to his memory in the east end of London was the first material embodiment of the movement.

    0
    0
  • The credit of inaugurating the new order of things belongs to Germany, and here again the religious influence came into play.

    0
    0
  • There he was already revered as a saint, and whatever credit may be given to some portions of the narratives of his biographers, there can be no doubt as to the wonderful influence which he exercised, as to the holiness of his life, and as to the love which he uniformly manifested to God and to his neighbour.

    0
    0
  • in 1909, to the improvement of the national credit and of the value of the revenues.

    0
    0
  • Grew speaks of the attire, or the stamens, as being the male parts, and refers to conversations with Sir Thomas Millington, Sedleian professor at Oxford, to whom the credit of the sexual theory seems really to belong.

    0
    0
  • of the Netherlands is entitled to the credit of having first thought of converting it into a ship canal from Brussels to the Scheldt.

    0
    0
  • A shock was thus given to the credit of the clergy in the province of literature, equal to that which was given in the province of science by the astronomical discoveries of the 17th century.

    0
    0
  • The overthrow of the monarchy on the 10th of August and the massacres of September were not their work, though they claimed credit for the results achieved.

    0
    0
  • Even persons without means may obtain land, an enactment enabling them to purchase on credit to the extent of nine-tenths of the value of the land acquired.

    0
    0
  • Philo drew his traditions from various sources, adapted them to suit his purpose, and conjured with a venerable name to gain credit for his narrative.

    0
    0
  • He also wrote scientific memoirs on the mouth of the Black Sea (1818-1819); on certain Egyptian lakes (during his stay in Egypt); and in particular the history of the Languedoc Canal (Histoire du canal du Midi, 2nd ed., Paris, 1804), the chief credit of which he claimed for his ancestor.

    0
    0
  • With his elder brother Wladislaus reigning over Bohemia and Hungary the credit of the Jagiellos in Europe had never been so great as it was now, and John Albert, bent upon military glory, eagerly placed himself at the head of what was to have been a great anti-Turkish league, but ultimately dwindled down to a raid upon Moldavia which ended in disaster.

    0
    0
  • In 1 7 26 he fixed the standard of the currency and secured the credit of the government by the regular payment thenceforward of the interest on the debt.

    0
    0
  • Dupuy's collected bearing, and his historic words: "Messieurs, la seance continue," gained him much credit.

    0
    0
  • No argument isneeded to show that this legend is unworthy of credit; even if it did deserve to be taken seriously, it still contains nothing respecting either a completion of the canon, or even a collection, or redaction, of sacred books by Ezra.

    0
    0
  • does not represent Cecil's conduct as having been very courageous; and it is more to his credit that he found no seat in the parliament of 1558, for which Mary had directed the return of "discreet and good Catholic members."

    0
    0
  • It was to their credit, indeed, that the encyclopaedists attacked them as the foremost representatives of Christianity, but they are accountable in no small degree in France, as in England, for alienating the minds of men from the religion for which they professed to work.

    0
    0
  • Lorenzo Ricci, then general of the Society, repudiated the debt, alleging lack of authority on Lavalette's part to pledge the credit of the Society, and he was sued by the creditors.

    0
    0
  • The executive branch consists of a president and vice-president, assisted by a cabinet of 8 secretaries of state: (1) foreign affairs; (2) interior; (3) justice; (4) public instruction and fine arts; (5) fomento, colonization and industry; (6) communications and public works; (7) finance and public credit; (8) war and marine.

    0
    0
  • From this time the Mexican government has met its obligations promptly, in consequence of which its credit is rated high and its bonds have even been quoted at a premium.

    0
    0
  • The rapid development of railway construction has largely increased this part of the public debt, the revenues of the country being insufficient to meet the subsidy obligations, but as the railways are built for the development of valuable resources and the opening of needed trade communications, the increase has occasioned no loss of credit.

    0
    0
  • Under the presidency of Herrera (1848-1851) attempts were made to Herrera, restore order and the public credit.

    0
    0
  • the production of silk and wine, of coca and quinine; to promote forestry; to improve elementary and higher education - for all which purposes the Ministerio del Fomento is a potent engine; to encourage colonization; and, above all, to place the national credit on a sound basis.

    0
    0
  • By an amendment of 1877, however, it is forbidden to authorize any town to lend money or give credit for the benefit of any corporation whose object is profit.

    0
    0
  • It is greatly to Wolcot's credit that, on learning his mistake, he sought the acquaintance of his young opponent, whose friend_ he remained to the end of his life.

    0
    0
  • The credit for first recognizing a trypanosome in human blood, and describing it as such, must undoubtedly be assigned to G.

    0
    0
  • Shrewd sense and considerable knowledge of the world came to the aid of stellar lore in the preparation of "prognostics" which, not unfrequently hitting off the event, earned him as much credit with the vulgar as his cosmical speculations with the learned.

    0
    0
  • He has usually been contrasted with his predecessor Bourdaloue, the latter having the credit of vigorous denunciation, Massillon that of gentle persuasiveness.

    0
    0
  • At this period, if we may credit the Memoirs (MalfuVit), he exhibited proofs of a tender and sympathetic nature.

    0
    0
  • Up to this point the credit of most that had been done may be set down to Archimedes.

    0
    0
  • For this great credit is due to the " North-west mounted police," the " Riders of the Plains," a highly efficient body of about seven hundred men, under the control of the federal government.

    0
    0
  • It had almost immediately the effect of lessening the exodus of artisans to the United States, and of improving the revenue and so restoring the national credit.

    0
    0
  • C. Van Horne, who was appointed president of the company in 1888, the new railway soon became the most prominent feature in the development of the country; lines of steamships were established on the great lakes and the Pacific; a stream of immigration began to flow into the prairie region; and the increasing prosperity of the railway had a powerful influence in improving the public credit.

    0
    0
  • Thus in one speech of Cicero, pro Caelio, some thirty conjectures of critics were found to be attested by a single recently discovered MS. Such readings it is now commonly the practice to transfer to the credit of the MS. and to suppress the fact that they were originally discovered by emendation.

    0
    0
  • Yet the custom is to give the credit of the emendation to him, and not to a successor who has seen what the right sense was and that this was the only word to express it, whereas the first scholar blundered once if not twice, first assigning the wrong sense to the passage and then selecting what (in most cases) would be the wrong word to express it.

    0
    0
  • Others having failed, he was induced in 1865 to assume the direction of the work, and to him more than to any other one man the credit for the construction of the Union Pacific railway was due.

    0
    0
  • The execution was effected largely through a construction company, the Credit Mobilier Company of America.

    0
    0
  • See Credit Mobilier Of America and the references there given.

    0
    0
  • Next year he went to Syria as proconsul and claimed credit for a victory gained by one of his officers over the Parthians, before his own arrival in the province.

    0
    0
  • After disposing of all their available assets, the state assumed the remaining liabilities, for which it had pledged its faith and credit, and these form a part.

    0
    0
  • A new constitution was adopted in 1875, which omitted the guaranty of the previous constitution that no one should be denied suffrage on account of race, colour or previous condition of servitude, and forbade the state to engage in internal improvements or to give its credit to any private enterprise.

    0
    0
  • The largest class of depositors are the farmers, who more and more look to the banks for credit, instead of to the merchants and cotton speculators.

    0
    0
  • In particular, he deserves credit for setting his face against the prevalent allegorical methods of exposition.

    0
    0
  • Letter Of Credit >>

    0
    0
  • La Beata Vergine della Consolata, another of Guarini's works, has a tower which originally belonged to the church of St Andrew, founded by the monk Bruning in 101 4, and attracts attention by Vincenzo Vela's beautiful kneeling statues of Queen Maria Teresa and Queen Maria Adelaide, as well as by the image of the Madonna, which has the credit of having warded off the cholera in 1835.

    0
    0
  • In taking office he found "600 millions to pay and neither money nor credit."

    0
    0
  • (e) To consider questions relating to agricultural co-operation, insurance and credit, in all their forms, collecting and publishing information which may be useful in the various countries for the: organization of undertakings relating to agricultural co-operation,, insurance and credit.

    0
    0
  • Epicurus, however, distinguishes Leucippus from Democritus, and Aristotle and Theophrastus expressly credit him with the invention of Atomism.

    0
    0
  • When Lord Bute was prime minister this legal satellite used, says Dr Johnson, to go on errands for him, and it is to Wedderburn's credit that he first suggested to the premier the propriety of granting Johnson a pension.

    0
    0
  • Considering the state of systematic ornithology at the time, Shaw's assignment of a position to this new and strange bird, of which he had but the skin, does him great credit, for he said it seemed "to approach more nearly to the Struthious and Gallinaceous tribes than to any other."

    0
    0
  • And his credit is still greater when we find the venerable John Latham, who is said to have examined the specimen with Shaw, placing it some years later among the penguins (Gen.

    0
    0
  • To both he was more than a royal founder, and the credit of the whole scheme belongs to him.

    0
    0
  • One would scarcely be justified, however, in supposing that it was anything like universal; for the purchasing power of such a sum was at that time considerable, representing as it did about 16-20 oxen or 100-120 sheep. It would hardly be safe to credit men of the sixhynde class in general with more than a horse, spear and shield.

    0
    0
  • This is ascribed as a credit to his policy and diplomacy by his daughter, by the Latin historians of the crusade to his treachery and falseness, but during the last twenty years of his life he lost much of his popularity.

    0
    0
  • He deserves the credit of having raised the Empire from a condition of anarchy and decay at a time when it was threatened on all sides by new dangers.

    0
    0
  • But credit should be given to the people for their splendid military qualities: both their cavalry and heavy infantry achieved a glorious record.

    0
    0
  • In virtue of the spurious donation of Constantine, forged at Rome in the time of Charlemagne, which was at first circulated in obscurity, but ended by gaining universal credit, it was believed that the first Christian emperor, in withdrawing to Constantinople, had bestowed on the pope all the provinces of the Western Empire, and that in consequence all sovereignty in the West, even that of the emperor, was derived from pontifical concessions.

    0
    0
  • Under Eugenius III., a Cistercian monk who was scarcely equal to his task, the papal absolutism grew sensibly weaker, and if we may credit the testimony of the usually wellinformed German chronicler, Otto of Freising, there arose in the college of cardinals a kind of fermentation which was exceedingly disquieting for the personal power of the leader of the Church.

    0
    0
  • Especial credit is due to his struggles against the moral corruptions of the day, though they proved inadequate to eliminate all traces of the prevalent disorders.

    0
    0
  • The terms on which business is conducted are various even in a single market, and it is sometimes a reproach that British firms are old-fashioned in their reluctance to give credit.

    0
    0
  • The Tientsin developments of German business on credit terms are said to have proved unsatisfactory, and heavy losses were suffered in Hong-Kong some years ago by merchants who endeavoured to initiate a bolder system of trading.

    0
    0
  • Sicily was to be conquered from the Hohenstaufen at the expense of England; and Henry pledged his credit to the papacy for enormous subsidies, although years of comparative inactivity had already overwhelmed him with debts.

    0
    0
  • It is to her credit that she saw the capacity of Suvarov, yet she never had as much confidence in him as she had in Potemkin, who may have been a man of genius, but was certainly no general.

    0
    0
  • But dyeing and embroidery probably came from Babylon in the first instance; glass-making seems to have been borrowed from Egypt; the invention of arithmetic and of weights and measures must be laid to the credit of the Babylonians.

    0
    0
  • The empress Euphrosyne tried in vain to sustain his credit and his court; Vatatzes, the favourite instrument of her attempts at reform, was assassinated by the emperor's orders.

    0
    0
  • To Aratus is due the credit of having made the Achaean League an effective instrument against tyrants and foreign enemies.

    0
    0
  • In the 15th and 16th centuries dissensions broke out among the knights, and the order declined in credit and wealth, until finally the grand master, Giannotto Castiglioni, resigned his position in favour of Emmanuel Philibert, duke of Savoy, in 1571.

    0
    0
  • It would be idle to discuss to whom the credit of first imagining the method rightfully belongs, for probably this is only one of the many occasions when new ideas have been born in several brains at the same time.

    0
    0
  • In 1696 Dr Thomas Bray, at the request of the governor and assembly of Maryland, was selected by the bishop of London as ecclesiastical commissary; and, having sold his effects, and raised money on credit, he sailed for Maryland in 1699, where he promoted, in various ways, the interests of the Church.

    0
    0
  • The older societies attribute to these new agencies more zeal than discretion, while the newer credit the older with a discretion that cripples zeal.

    0
    0
  • The distress of the years 1846-47, the causes of which he discerned in the slight amount of credit obtainable by the small landed proprietors, led him to seek for a remedy in co-operation, and at Heddersdorf and at Weyerbusch he founded the first agricultural co-operative loan banks (Darlehnskassenverein).

    0
    0
  • According to the professed champions of that character, this conduct was a tissue of such dastardly imbecility, such heartless irresolution and such brainless inconsistency as for ever to dispose of her time-honoured claim to the credit of intelligence and courage.

    0
    0
  • Another idea of Stevinus, for which even Hugo Grotius gave him great credit, was his notion of a bygone age of wisdom.

    0
    0
  • He offered to take Charles on his expedition, and the boy of thirteen, having been appointed general of artillery by Don Carlos, shared with credit the dangers of the successful siege of Gaeta.

    0
    0
  • But the archdukes' treasury was now empty,and their credit exhausted; Y both sides were weary of fighting, and serious negotia tions for peace were set on foot.

    0
    0
  • If we are to credit a 9th century biographer, Gregory abbreviated and otherwise simplified the Sacramentary of Gelasius, producing a revised edition with which his own name has become associated, and which represents the groundwork of the modern Roman Missal.

    0
    0
  • - Though this estimate seems to be near the truth as regards the British ores, it does not credit the United States with one-tenth, if indeed with one-twentieth, of their true quantity as estimated by that country's Geological Survey in 1907.

    0
    0
  • We may note with interest that the three great iron producers so closely related by blood-Great Britain, the United States and Germany and Luxemburg-made in 1907 81% of the world's pig iron and 83% of its steel; and that the four great processes by which nearly all steel and wrought iron are made-the puddling, crucible and both the acid and basic varieties of the Bessemer and open-hearth processes, as well as the steam-hammer and grooved rolls for rolling iron and steel-were invented by Britons, though in the case of the openhearth process Great Britain must share with France the credit of the invention.

    0
    0
  • Asuncion is laid out on a regular plan, the credit for which is largely due to Dictator Francia; the principal streets-are paved and lighted by gas and electricity; and telephone and street-car services are maintained.

    0
    0
  • He was convinced that what is bad for the individual credit must be bad for the state also.

    0
    0
  • A national debt, he maintains, enriches the capital at the expense of the provinces; further, it creates a leisured class of stockholders, and possesses all the disadvantages of paper credit.

    0
    0
  • " Either the nation must destroy public credit, or public credit will destroy the nation."

    0
    0
  • To Kekule is due the credit of taking the decisive step in introducing the notion of tetravalent carbon in a clear way, i.e.

    0
    0
  • To John Ray, the famous English naturalist, the credit is generally given of first making species a definite term in zoology and botany, but Ray owed much of his classification to Kaspar or Gaspard Bauhin (1550-1624), profressor of Greek and of Anatomy and Botany at Basel, and much of his clear definition of terms to an unpublished MS. of Joachim Jung of Hamburg (1587-1657).

    0
    0
  • A large war credit was voted, the strength of the army was raised and strong bodies of troops were moved to the frontier.

    0
    0
  • The Norse writers, who are the only authorities, gave all the credit to their own countrymen, and according to them all the intelligence of Olaf's enemies, and most of their valour, were to be found in Eric Hakonson.

    0
    0
  • A story, mentioned by the chronicler Echard as unworthy of credit, makes Boniface VIII., on the first day of Lent, cast the ashes in the archbishop's eyes instead of on his head, with the words, "Remember that thou art a Ghibelline, and with thy fellow Ghibellines wilt return to naught."

    0
    0
  • His conduct now, as at all times, did "credit to his conscientiousness rather than to his wisdom."

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Coke has the credit of having repeatedly braved the anger of the king.

    0
    0
  • To undoubted military genius he added considerable political sagacity, and he deserves particular credit for his efforts to improve the administration of justice.

    0
    0
  • Outside the Jewish community he was known as the philo sopher Avicebron (Avencebrol, Avicebrol, &c.) The credit of identifying this name as a medieval corruption of Ibn Gabirol is due to S.

    0
    0
  • He deserves credit for his protection of Wycliffe, though he had no sympathy with his religious or political opinions.

    0
    0
  • The artifice was successful, and no sooner had Wallis publicly refuted the solution than Hobbes claimed the credit of it, and went more wonderfully than ever astray in its defence.

    0
    0
  • Aubrey takes credit for having tried to induce Hobbes to write upon the subject in 1664 by presenting him with a copy of Bacon's Elements of the Laws of England, and though the attempt was then unsuccessful, Hobbes later on took to studying the statutebook, with Coke upon Littleton.

    0
    0
  • PAUL OF SAMOSATA, patriarch of Antioch (260-272), was, if we may credit the encyclical letter of his ecclesiastical opponents preserved in Eusebius's History, bk.

    0
    0
  • Pompey claimed the credit of finishing the war, and received the honour of a triumph, while only a simple ovation was decreed to Crassus.

    0
    0
  • No bolder or more original work of irrigation has been carried out in India, and the credit of it is due to Colonel J.

    0
    0
  • These assertions, however, find little credit with recent critics.

    0
    0
  • The general opinion was that the strong faculties which had produced the Dictionary and the Rambler were beginning to feel the effect of time and of disease, and that the old man would best consult his credit by writing no more.

    0
    0
  • But after Engelberts murder (November 1225) there was a change for the worse, and the only success which can be placed to the credit of the German arms during the next few years was tt~e regaining of the lands ceded to Denmark in 1215, lands which included the cities of Hamburg and Lbeck.

    0
    0
  • He proposed, therefore, to set aside a credit of 17,500,000 for this purpose.

    0
    0
  • It merits the most credit in raising the quality of Irish pigs.

    0
    0
  • Agriculture languished, hampered, as in France before the Revolution, by the feudal privileges of a noble caste which no longer gave any equivalent service to the state; trade was strangled by the system of high tariffs at the frontier and internal octrois; and finally public credit was shaken to its foundations by lavish issues of paper money and the neglect to publish the budget.

    0
    0
  • The opposition in the Delegations, which met at the end of the year, was so strong that the government had to be content with a credit to cover the expenses for 1879 of less than half what they had originally asked, and the supplementary estimate of 40,000,000 gulden for 1878 was not voted till the next year.

    0
    0
  • The Hungarians had not sufficient credit to establish a national bank of their own, and at the settlement of 1877 they procured, as a concession to themselves, that it should be converted into an Austro-Hungarian bank, with a head office at Pest as well as at Vienna, and with the management divided between the two countries.

    0
    0
  • The credit of the state has risen, the chronic deficit has disappeared, the currency has been put on a sound basis, and part of the unfunded debt has been paid off.

    0
    0
  • In the debate on the vote of credit in February 1878, he made one of his impressive speeches, urging the government not to increase the difficulties manufacturers had in finding employment for their workpeople by any single word or act which could shake confidence in business.

    0
    0
  • In both Houses Mr Layard's despatch was read, and in the excited Commons Mr Forster's resolution opposing the vote of credit was withdrawn.

    0
    0
  • To the credit of the slaveholding statesman it must be said that he responded favourably, but before he had time for the requisite preliminaries Arthur Tappan, a philanthropic merchant of New York, contributed the necessary sum and set the prisoner free after an incarceration of seven weeks.

    0
    0
  • In general we find that Athenian orators take special credit on the ground that the Athenian had given to her allies the constitutional advantages which they themselves enjoyed.

    0
    0
  • On theeastsidearethebourseand the Credit Lyonnais, on the north the buildings of the American mission.

    0
    0
  • Such pilgrims doubtless believed that the pious act would stand to their credit when the day of death arrived.

    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding, or, rather, as a consequence of, the unexampled material prosperity of the country, 1907 was a year of severe financial crisis, due to over-trading, excessive credit and the building mania induced by the rapid economic progress of Egypt, and aggravated by the unfavourable monetary conditions existing in America and Europe during the latter part of the year.

    0
    0
  • Military intervention being now imperatively demanded, a vote of credit for ~2,3oo,ooo was passed in the British House of Commons on the 27th of July.

    0
    0
  • General Stephenson still urged the Suakin-Berber route, and was informed on the 26th of August that Lord Wolseley would be appointed to take over the command in Egypt for the purposes of the expedition, for which a vote of credit had been taken in the House of Commons on the 5th of August.

    0
    0
  • The methods he adopted would have done credit to, Cesare Borgia; they may be studied in detail in the lurid pages of Pouqueville.

    0
    0
  • In 1665 he served with credit under the duke of York in the sanguinary naval battle off Lowestoft.

    0
    0
  • In 1678, when Charles was driven into war with Louis, Monmouth took the command of the English contingent, and again gained credit for personal courage at the battle of St Denis.

    0
    0
  • Thus regarded, even without remarking that the Novels, never having been officially collected, much less incorporated with the Codex, mar the symmetry of the structure, Justinian's work may appear to entitle him and Tribonian to much less credit than they have usually received for it.

    0
    0
  • Castlereagh, writing of him to Lord Liverpool, gives him credit for " grand qualities," but adds that he is "suspicious and undecided."

    0
    0
  • He shared with Sigismund the credit of having ended the Great Schism by obtaining the election of Pope Martin V.

    0
    0
  • There is no reason to credit the scandalous reports of an illicit attachment.

    0
    0
  • Charles sign declarations yet more degrading, to the dis credit of his father and mother.

    0
    0
  • When Wallace found how much more fully Darwin was equipped for expounding the new views, he exhibited an unselfish modesty that fully repaid Darwin's generosity, henceforth described himself as a follower of Darwin, entitled his most important publication on the theory of evolution Darwinism, and did not issue it until 1889, long after the world had given full credit to Darwin.

    0
    0
  • In the Holy Land the list was still longer: the natives were ready to show everything for which the foreigners inquired, and the pilgrim was eager to credit everything.

    0
    0
  • Other documents and statements in support of the Tell story have even less claim to credit.

    0
    0
  • An orator will hold the interest of his hearers for hours together at a political gathering, and in his speech he will bring in historical allusions and precedents, and will make apt quotations from ancient legends in a manner which would do credit to the best parliamentary orators.

    0
    0
  • The constitution prohibits the state from lending its credit or making appropriations in aid of any corporation, association or individual, and from constructing internal improvements, and the counties, townships, and other political units cannot incur indebtedness in excess of 5% of their assessed property valuation.

    0
    0
  • Money being scarce, the legislature in 1819 chartered a state bank which was authorized to do business on the credit of the state.

    0
    0
  • The experiment proved unsuccessful; the state's credit declined and a heavy debt was incurred, and in 1840 the policy of aiding public improvements was abandoned.

    0
    0
  • Otherwise, he wrote, he would lose his credit with the king, who might even be tempted to throw off his allegiance to Rome altogether.

    0
    0
  • In some examinations, unless say a0% or more marks are obtained for a particular subject, no credit is given for the paper in that subject.

    0
    0
  • But it is to his credit that he has been himself at the trouble to refer to the principal sources used by Socrates (Rufinus, Eusebius, Athanasius, Sabinus, the collections of epistles, Palladius), and has not unfrequently supplemented Socrates from them; and also that he has used some new authorities, in particular sources relating to Christianity in Persia and to the history of Arianism, monkish histories, the Vita Martini of Sulpicius, and works of Hilarius.

    0
    0
  • It will always remain to Wedgwood's credit that he was the most successful and original potter the world has ever seen - the only one, through all the centuries, of whom it can be truthfully said that the whole subsequent course of pottery manufacture has been influenced by his skill.

    0
    0
  • He deserves great credit for having converted the somewhat old-fashioned polytechnical school at Delft into a technical university which rivals the very best.

    0
    0
  • The suppression of the Jesuits bulks so large in the pontificate of Clement that he has scarcely been given due credit for his praiseworthy attempt to reduce the burdens of taxation and to reform the financial administration, nor for his liberal encouragement of art and learning, of which the museum Pio-Clementino is a lasting monument.

    0
    0
  • Zealous defenders credit him with all virtues, and bless him as the instrument divinely ordained to restore the peace of the Church; virulent detractors charge him with ingratitude, cowardice and double-dealing.

    0
    0
  • His financial work brought him a less enviable notoriety, though a curious freak of history has deprived him of the credit which is his due for "Morton's fork."

    0
    0
  • He attempted to compromise by occupying the Isthmus of Suez, but the vote of credit was rejected in the Chamber by 417 votes to 75, and the ministry resigned.

    0
    0
  • When it is added that Fauquier was a passionate gambler, and that the gentry who gathered every winter at Williamsburg, the seat of government of the province, were ruinously addicted to the same weakness, and that Jefferson had a taste for racing, it does credit to his early strength of character that of his social opportunities he took only the better.

    0
    0
  • Jefferson is of course not entitled to the sole credit for all these services: Wythe, George Mason and James Madison, in particular, were his devoted lieutenants, and - after his departure for France - the principals in the struggle; moreover, an approving public opinion must receive large credit.

    0
    0
  • In 1865-1866, it devolved upon Bigelow, as minister to France, to represent his government in its delicate negotiations concerning the French occupation of Mexico, and he discharged this difficult task with credit.

    0
    0
  • The fixing of the revenue demand has conferred upon the owner a credit which he never before possessed, by allowing him a certain share of the unearned increment.

    0
    0
  • This credit he may use improvidently, but none the less has the land system of India been raised from a lower to a higher stage of civilization.

    0
    0
  • Francis, on the other hand, Hastings's great rival, deserves the credit of being among the first to advocate a limitation of the state demand in perpetuity.

    0
    0
  • The concluding years of Wellesley's rule were occupied with a series of operations against Holkar, which brought no credit to the British name.

    0
    0
  • In both cases Lord Dalhousie deserves a large share of the credit.

    0
    0
  • History The credit of the discovery of the telescope has been a fruitful subject of discussion.

    0
    0
  • The practical discovery of the instrument was certainly made in Holland about 1608, but the credit of the original invention has been claimed on behalf of three individuals, Hans Lippershey and Zacharias Jansen, spectacle-makers in Middelburg, and James Metius of Alkmaar (brother of Adrian Metius the mathematician) .

    0
    0
  • Descartes, in his treatise on Dioptrics (1637), attributes the discovery to Metius "about thirty years ago," whilst Schyraelus de Rheita, a Capuchin friar, in his Oculus Enoch et Eliae (Antwerp, 1645), gives the credit to Lippershey about 1609.

    0
    0
  • These brilliant achievements, together with the immense improvement of the instrument under the hands of Galileo, overshadowed in a great degree the credit due to the original discoverer, and led to the universal adoption of the name of the Galilean telescope for the form of the instrument invented by Lippershey.

    0
    0
  • His efforts to procure a loan were not -much more successful, and he was seriously embarrassed by the action of Congress in drawing bills upon him for large sums. Although by importuning the Spanish minister, and by pledging his personal responsibility, Jay was able to meet some of the bills, he was at last forced to protest others; and the credit of the United States was saved only by a timely subsidy from France.

    0
    0
  • As a critic he was a very able writer, and Sainte-Beuve gives him the credit of discovering Father Jacques Bridayne, and of giving Bossuet his rightful place as a preacher above Massillon; as a politician, his wit and eloquence make him a worthy rival of Mirabeau.

    0
    0
  • Cicero pledged his credit for the loyalty of Octavian, who styled him " father " and affected to take his advice on all occasions (Epp. ad Brut.

    0
    0
  • Nepos thought that he would have been an ideal historian, but as Cicero ranks history with declamation and on one occasion with great naiveté asks Lucius Lucceius, who was embarking on this task, to embroider the facts to his own credit, we cannot accept this criticism (Fam.

    0
    0
  • To the credit of many local jurisdictions, they speedily followed the lead of the central authority.

    0
    0
  • We can scarcely, therefore, credit the charges made by the adversaries of his chosen successor Yazid, that he was a drinker of wine, fond of pleasure, careless about religion.

    0
    0
  • The eighty banks of deposit in which it was lying had regarded this sum almost as a permanent loan, and had inflated credit on the basis of it.

    0
    0
  • The necessary calling in of their loans in order to meet the drafts in favour of the states, combining with the breach of the overstrained credit between America and Europe and the decline in the price of cotton, brought about a crash which prostrated the whole financial, industrial and commercial system of the country for six or seven years.

    0
    0
  • Each family has its own dwelling-place and a small garden; each member of a family has an annual allowance of credit at the common store and a room in the dwelling-house; and each group of families has a large garden, a common kitchen and a common dining-hall where men and women eat at separate tables.

    0
    0
  • The notes can only be issued by members of a note association, a body constituted under government regulations, whose members must uphold the credit and validity of their notes.

    0
    0
  • There so-called genuine relics of the ark were exhibited, and a monastery and mosque of commemoration were built; but the monastery was destroyed by lightning in 776 A.D., and the tradition has declined in credit.

    0
    0
  • The sagacity, activity and commercial enterprise of the Parsees are proverbial in the East, and their credit as merchants is almost unlimited.

    0
    0
  • The hired labourer suffers from the " truck " system, taking his pay in board and living, in goods, in trade on his employer's credit at the village store; the independent farmer suffers in his turn from unlimited credit at the same store, where he secures everything on the credit of his future crops; and if he is reduced to borrow money, he secures it by vesting the title to his property temporarily in his creditor.

    0
    0
  • The debt of the state was increased about $9,375,000 from 1868 to 187 4, largely for railroad and levee schemes; much of the money was misappropriated, and in a case involving the payment of railway aid bonds the action of the legislature in pledging the credit of the state was held nugatory by the state supreme court in 1875 on the ground that, contrary to the constitution, the bond issue had never been referred to popular vote.

    0
    0
  • The power of legislation was taken from it by specific inhibition in thirty-one subjects before within its power; its control of the public domain, its powers in taxation, and its use of the state credit were carefully safe-guarded.

    0
    0
  • It is probably safest to credit Thales with the bare mechanical conception of a universal material cause, leaving pantheistic ideas to a later period of thought.

    0
    0
  • The great danger is that we should credit him with more than he actually thought.

    0
    0
  • Such an elaborate alphabet could hardly have been invented except by a scholar, and tradition, probably rightly, has attached the credit for its invention to Cyril (originally Constantine), who along with his brother Methodius proceeded in A.D.

    0
    0
  • The "caravans" of boats laden with iron-ware, starting from the Urals works in the spring, reach Nizhniy in August, after a stay at the fair of Laishev, which supplies the lower Volga; and the purchases of iron made at Nizhniy for Asia and middle Russia determine the amount of credit that will be granted for the next year's business to the owners of the ironworks, on which credit most of them entirely depend.

    0
    0
  • It exercises a yet greater influence on the corn and salt trades throughout Russia, and still more on the whole of the trade in Siberia and Turkestan, both depending entirely on the conditions of credit which the Siberian and Turkestan merchants obtain at the fair.

    0
    0
  • For Stein was sending troops across to reinforce Krauss, and incidentally, according to Krauss, to claim the credit which was due to the Bosnians alone.

    0
    0
  • Say in 1818 gave a good description of a new species and founded the premier genus Diastylis, but other investigators derived little credit from the subject till more than sixty years after its introduction by the Russian Lepekhin.

    0
    0
  • The credit for detecting its value belongs to the late Gaston Paris, although his edition (1897) was partially anticipated by the editors of the Monumenta Germaniae Historica, who published some selections in the twenty-seventh volume of their Scriptores (1885).

    0
    0
  • To unravel plots and weave counterplots; to meet treachery with fraud; to parry force with sleights of hand; to credit human nature with the basest motives, while the blackest crimes were contemplated with cold enthusiasm for their cleverness, was reckoned then the height of political sagacity.

    0
    0
  • Much no doubt of the credit of all this is due to Seneca and Burrus.

    0
    0
  • It is to his credit, too, that he would not allow the conspirators against his own life to be put to death.

    0
    0
  • His support of Hamilton's financial plans not only insured a speedy restoration of public credit, but also, and even more important, gave the new government constitutional ground on which to stand; while his firmness in dealing with the "Whisky Insurrection" taught a much-needed and wholesome lesson of respect for the Federal power.

    0
    0
  • At the Paris International Exhibition of 1878 several native Finnish painters and sculptors exhibited works which would do credit to any country; and both in the fine and applied arts Finland occupied a position thoroughly creditable.

    0
    0
  • A work on " finance " may deal with the Money Market or the Stock Exchange; it may treat of banking and credit organization, or it may be devoted to state revenue and expenditure, which is on the whole the prevailing sense.

    0
    0
  • But the use of the system of credit, and the general establishment of constitutional government, have enabled the difficulty to be surmounted by the creation on a vast scale of national debts.

    0
    0
  • The credit of Oates was thus, in the eyes of the people, re-established, and Coleman and others named were imprisoned.

    0
    0
  • The refusals of Charles to credit or to countenance the attacks on his wife are the most creditable episodes in his life.

    0
    0
  • Nor did he seem to have lost his courage, if we are to believe the common reports of the day,' though certainly they do not appear worthy of very much credit.

    0
    0
  • His success as a dramatist had by this time gone some way to disabuse hostile critics of the suspicions as regards his personal character which had been excited by the apparent looseness of morals which since his Oxford days it had always pleased him to affect; but to the consternation of his friends, who had ceased to credit the existence of any real moral obliquity, in 1895 came fatal revelations as the result of his bringing a libel action against the marquis of Queensberry; and at the Old Bailey, in May, Wilde was sentenced to two years' imprisonment with hard labour for offences under the Criminal Law Amendment Act.

    0
    0
  • In the following year he was elected a member of the Prussian Chamber of Deputies; in 1912 he also became a member of the Reichstag, and on the outbreak of the World War he distinguished himself by the violent opposition which he offered to the policy of the Government and the successive votes of credit.

    0
    0
  • the old fashion and the new fashion," and he gives credit to Blaeu for the invention of the new and decidedly improved press (fig.

    0
    0
  • Having to face an increased expenditure without offending the Radical electorate by unpopular taxes, he had recourse to unsound methods of finance, which seriously embarrassed Italian credit for some years after he finally laid down office in 1888.

    0
    0
  • France annexed Corsica in 1768, but this was felt to be the work of the minister Chauvelin, and reflected no credit on the king.

    0
    0
  • The revolution was in the meantime complete; and Knox, who takes credit for having done much to end the enmity with England which was so long thought necessary for Scotland's independence, was strangely enough destined, beyond all other men, to leave the stamp of a more inward independence upon his country and its history.

    0
    0
  • He improved the state of trade, lowered taxation, encouraged industry and promoted education, ameliorated the judicature and materially raised the credit of Russia.

    0
    0
  • A foreign critic, especially an English one, will never be able to give Dalin so much credit as the Swedes do; but he was certainly an unsurpassable master of pastiche.

    0
    0
  • It was to Fru Nordenflycht's credit that she discovered and encouraged the talent of two very distinguished poets younger than herself, Creutz and Gyllenborg, who published volumes of poetry in collaboration.

    0
    0
  • Like Brazil, Chile has been careful to preserve her foreign credit, and though an average indebtedness of about Do per capita may seem large for a nation with so much absolute poverty among its people, the government is finding no difficulty in negotiating new loans, the mineral resources of the country and the conservative instincts of the people being considered satisfactory guarantees.

    0
    0
  • To Montt, as minister under Bulnes and afterwards as president, must be given the main credit for the far-seeing policy which laid the foundations of the prosperity of Chile; and though the administration was in many ways harsh and narrow, firm government, rather than liberty that would have tended to anarchy, was essential for the success of the young republic.

    0
    0
  • All of these had, more or less, contributed something to the knowledge of the subject, whether as writers or as collectors, or in both capacities, and to all the due meed of credit was Telegraph.5 assigned.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →