Carausius sentence example

carausius
  • MARCUS AURELIUS CARAUSIUS, tyrant or usurper in Britain, A.D.
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  • Carausius thereupon crossed over to Britain and proclaimed himself an independent ruler.
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  • In 292 Constantius Chlorus besieged and captured Gessoriacum (hitherto in possession of Carausius), together with part of his fleet and naval stores.
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  • Constantius then made extensive preparations to ensure the reconquest of Britain, but before they were completed Carausius was murdered by Allectus, his praefect of the guards (Aurelius Victor, Caesares, 39; Eutropius ix.
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  • Nothing is known of this Carausius (A.
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  • Evans in Numismatic Chronicle, 1887, "On a coin of a second Carausius Caesar in Britain in the Fifth Century").
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  • Watts de Peyster, The History of Carausius, the Dutch Augustus (1858); P. H.
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  • Webb, The Reign and Coinage of Carausius (1908).
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  • Less likely is the theory of Palgrave that the Bretwaldas were the successors of the pseudo-emperors, Maximus and Carausius, and claimed to share the imperial dignity of Rome; or that of Kemble, who derives Bretwalda from the British word breotan, to distribute, and translates it "widely ruling."
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  • In 287 he suppressed the rising of the peasants (Bagaudae) in Gaul, but in 289, after a three years' struggle, his colleague and he were compelled to acquiesce in the assumption by his lieutenant Carausius (who had crossed over to Britain) of the title of Augustus.
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  • In Britain Carausius and subsequently Allectus had declared themselves independent, and it was not till 296 that, by the defeat of Allectus, it was re-united with the empire.
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  • Maximian and Diocletian were compelled to acknowledge the rule of Carausius in Britain; numerous coins are extant with the heads of Carausius, Diocletian and Maximian, bearing the legend "Carausius et fratres sui."
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  • Haverfield in Cumberland and Westmoreland Antiquarian Soc. Transactions, 18 95, p. 437) A copper coin found at Richborough, inscribed Domino Carausio Ces., must be ascribed to a Carausius of later date, since the type of the reverse is not found until the middle of the 4th century at the earliest.
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