Capensis sentence example

capensis
  • high; the stem of the other, Hemitelia capensis, sometimes reaches 30 ft.
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  • Ant-eaters (Orycteropus capensis), porcupines, weasels, squirrels, rock rabbits, hares and cane rats are common in different localities.
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  • Mimosa and the wild wilge-boom (Salix capensis) are the common trees on the banks and rivers, while the weeping willow is frequent round the farmsteads.
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  • The spring hare (pedetes capensis) abounds.
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  • capensis or S.
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  • - Male Kudu (Strepsiceros capensis).
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  • Strepsiceros capensis (or S.
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  • capensis), the long-eared rock-hare (L.
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  • - The Cape Hyrax (Procavia capensis).
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  • Of this form the earliest known species, P. capensis, is the type; but there are many other species, as P. syriaca, and P. brucei from Syria and eastern Africa.
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  • P. capensis from South Africa is hardy south of the Thames and in favoured localities.
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  • capensis, or Cape ant-bear from South Africa, and the northern aard-vark (0.
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  • Thiselton-Dyer (ed.), Flora Capensis, vols.
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  • - The Cape Barn-owl (Strix capensis), showing the kitelike surfaces presented by the ventral aspect of the wings and body in flight.
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  • Brown, Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States and Canada (New York, 1896); Hooker's Flora of British India; Flora Capensis (edited by W.
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  • capensis has also scarlet legs; but in the otherwise very similar bird of Australia and New Zealand, H.
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  • The Cape-Pigeon or Pintado Petrel, Daption capensis, is one that has long been well known to mariners and other wayfarers on the great waters, while those who voyage to or from Australia, whatever be the route they take, are 1 Thus Oestrelata haesitata, the Capped Petrel, a species whose proper home seems to be Guadeloupe and some of the neighbouring West-Indian Islands, has occurred in the State of New York, near Boulogne, in Norfolk, and in Hungary (Ibis, 1884, p. 202).
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  • There are seventeen pairs in P. capensis and eighteen in P. balfouri, while in P. jamaicensis the number varies from twenty-nine to forty-three.
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  • - Outer jaw-claw of P. capensis.
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  • P. capensis.
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  • Peripatus capensis, drawn from life.
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  • - Ventral view of the head of P. capensis.
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  • - Ventral view of last leg of a male P. capensis.
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  • The young of P. capensis are born in April and May.
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  • - Peripatus capensis dissected so as to show the alimentary canal, slime glands and salivary glands.
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  • ninth pair of legs of P. capensis.
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  • - Brain and anterior part of the ventral nerve-cords of Peripatus capensis enlarged and viewed from the ventral surface.
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  • - Male Generative Organs of Peripatus capensis.
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  • in breadth; that of P. capensis is 56 mm.
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  • The development has been worked out in P. capensis, to which species the following description refers.
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  • - A Series of Embryos of P. capensis.
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  • The following South African species may be mentioned: P. capensis (Grube), with 17 (rarely 18) pairs of claw-bearing legs; P. balfouri (Sedgw.) with 18 (rarely 19) pairs; P. moseleyi (Wood-M.), with 20 to 24 pairs.
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  • Balfour, "The Anatomy and Development of P. capensis," posthumous memoir, edited by H.
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  • Moseley, "On the Structure and Development of Peripatus capensis," Phil.
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  • Sedgwick, "A Monograph of the Development of Peripatus capensis" (originally published in various papers in the Quart.
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  • Plumbago capensis (cape plumbago capensis (cape plumbago) scrambles in warm stony walls, with its flowers obscuring all foliage.
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  • c. capensis, while the legs are fully spotted and the colour-pattern on the body (especially in the last-named) is more of a blotched type, that The North African or Nubian Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis).
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  • Thus white honeysuckle and false honeysuckle are names for the North American Azalea viscosa; Australian or heath honeysuckle is the Australian Banksia serrata, Jamaica honeysuckle, Passiflora laurifolia, dwarf honeysuckle the widely spread Cornus suecica, Virgin Mary's honeysuckle the European Pulmonaria officinalis, while West Indian honeysuckle is Tecoma capensis, and is also 'a' name applied to Desmodium.
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  • Cape Figwort (Phygelius) - P. capensis, a Cape plant of some beauty, 3 or 4 feet high, and bearing racemes of brilliant scarlet flowers, which open in May and June and continue far into autumn.
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  • N. capensis is about the same size as N. selaginoides, and is of similar growth, its flowers larger, and not of so pure a white.
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  • N. selaginoides and N. capensis require to be sown early in heat, and to be transplanted in May in light, rich sandy loam in warm borders.
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  • P. capensis, usually grown under glass, may be planted out in summer, bearing its lovely pale blue flowers continuously.
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  • P. capensis is used with good effect in German gardens.
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  • The sap of the jewelweed plant (Impatiens capensis) is thought to be helpful in binding to and removing urushiol from skin.
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