Canovas sentence example

canovas
  • Barely eight months after the restoration of the Bourbons in the autumn of 1875, Sagasta accepted the new state of things, and organized the Liberal dynastic party that confronted Canovas and the Conservatives for five years in the Cortes, until the Liberal leader used the influence of his military allies, Jovellar, Campos and others, to induce the king to ask him to form a Cabinet in 1881.
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  • On the death of that king in 1885, Sagasta became premier with the assent of Canovas, who suspended party hostility in the early days of the regency of Queen Christina.
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  • A coalition of generals and Conservatives turned Sagasta out in July 1890, and he only returned to the councils of the regency in December 1892, when the Conservative party split into two groups under Canovas and Silvela.
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  • Sagasta kept quiet until nearly the end of the struggle with the colonies, when the queen-regent had to dismiss the Conservative party, much shorn of its prestige by the failure of its efforts to pacify the colonies, and by the assassination of its chief, Canovas delCastillo.
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  • Thereupon the president of the council resigned, and the power was transferred to the king's plenipotentiary and adviser, Canovas del Castillo.
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  • In 1881 the king refused to sanction the law by which the ministers were to remain in office for a fixed term of eighteen months, and upon the consequent resignation of Canovas del Castillo, he summoned Sagasta, the Liberal leader, to form a cabinet.
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  • Of late, largely under the inspiration of Don Antonio Canovas, there has been a certain reaction in his favour.
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  • After Marshal Campos had failed to pacify Cuba, the Conservative government of Canovas del Castillo sent out Weyler, and this selection met the approval of most Spaniards, who thought him the proper man to crush the rebellion.
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  • Hence the contrast between his attitude from 1876 to 1886, during the reign of Alphonso XII., when he stood in the front rank of the Opposition to defend the reforms of that revolution against Senor Canovas, and his attitude from 1886 to 1891.
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  • Camacho took a prominent part in all financial debates and committees, was offered a seat in the Mon cabinet of 1864, and was appointed under-secretary of state finances in 1866 under Canovas and O'Donnell.
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  • In 1890 the Conservative cabinet of Seor Canovas raised the duties on agricultural products, in 1891 it denounced all the treaties of commerce that included most-favored-nation treatment clauses, and in 1892 a new tariff law established considerably higher duties than those of I 882in fact, duties ranging from 40% to 300%.
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  • The Restored Monarchy, 1874-1900.The first act of Aiphonso was a royal decree confirming the appointment of Canovas del Castillo as prime minister.
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  • Though much of his time and energies had been devoted to the re-establishment of peace at home and in the colonies from 1875 to 1880, Seor Canovas had displayed considerable activity and resolution in the reorganization of the monarchy.
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  • The electors proved, as usual, so docile, and they were so well handled by the authorities, that Canovas obtained a parliament with great majorities in both houses which voted a limited franchise to take the place of universal suffrage.
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  • From the moment that such former revolutionists as Sagasta, Ulloa, Leon y Castillo, Camacho, Alcnzo Martinez and the marquis de la Vega de Armijo declared that they adhered to the Restoration, Canovas did not object to their saying in the same breath that they would enter the Cortes to defend as much as possible what they had achieved during the Revolution, and to protest and agitate, legally and pacifically, until they succeeded in re-establishing some day all that the first cabinet of Alphonso XII.
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  • Thus Canovas meant to keep up the appearance of a constitutional and parliamentary government with what most Spaniards considered a fair proportional representation of existing parties, except the Carlists and the most advanced Republicans, who only crept into the House of Deputies in some later parliaments.
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  • Canovas ruled his own coalition of Conservatives and Catholics with an iron hand, managing the affairs of Spain for six years with only two short interruptions, when he stood aside for a few months, just long enough to convince the king that the Conservative party could not retain its cohesion, even under such men as Marshals Jovellar and Campos, if he did not choose to support them.
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  • In the early years of the Restoration the king and Canovas acted in concert in two most delicate matters.
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  • Canovas boldly declared in the Cortes that the era of military pronunciamientos ha~d been for ever closed by the Restoration, and the king reminded the generals more than once that he intended to be the head of the army.
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  • Barely seventeen months after the death of his first wife, the king listened to the advice of Canovas and married, in November 1879, the Austrian archduchess Maria Christina of Habsburg.
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  • Lopez-Dominguez and Serranowho had taken offence at the idea that Canovas wanted to monopolize power for civil politicians.
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  • Canovas came to the conclusion that it was expedient for the Restoration to give a fair trial to the quondam revolutionists who coalesced under Sagasta in such conditions.
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  • The policy of Sagasta in domestic affairs resembled that of Canovas.
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  • The support of Sagasta did not last long, and he managed with skill to elbow the Dynastic Left out of office, and to convince all dissentients and free lances that there was neither room nor prospect for third parties in the state between the two great coalitions of Liberals and Conservatives under Sagasta and Canovas.
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  • When Posada Herrera resigned, the Liberals and Sagasta did not seem much displeased at the advent to power of Canovas in 1884, and soon almost all the members of the Dynastic Left joined the Liberal party.
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  • From 1881 to 1883, under the two Liberal administrations of Sagasta and Posada Herrera, the foreign policy of Spain was much like that of Canovas, who likewise had had to bow to the kings very evident inclination for closer relations with Germany, Austria and Italy than with any other European powers.
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  • Nevertheless, in Aiphonso Madrid, Canovas would not allow the press to say Xii.
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  • All looked chiefly to Marshal Campos and Canovas del Castillo for statesmanlike and disinterested advice.
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  • Canovas assured the queenregent that he was ready to undertake the task of protecting the new state of things if it was thought wise to continue the Conservative policy of the late king, but in the circumstances created by his death, he must frankly say that he considered it advisable to send for Seor Sagasta and ask him to take the reins of government, with a view to inaugurate the regency under progressive and conciliatory policy.
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  • Sagasta was summoned to El Pardo, and the result of his interview with the queeai-regent, Canovas and the generals, was the understanding ever afterwards known as the pact of El Pardo, the corner-stone of the whole policy of the regency, and of the two great statesmen who so long led the great dynastic parties and the governments of Doa Christina.
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  • It was agreed that during the first years of the regency, Canovas and Sagasta would assist each other in defending the institutions and the dynasty.
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  • Sagasta made no secret of the fact that it was his intention to alter the laws and the constitution of the monarchy so as to make them very much resemble the constitution of the Revolution of 1868, but he undertook to carry out his reform policy by stages, and without making too many concessions to radicalism and democracy, so that Canovas and his Conservative and Catholic followers might bow to the fiecessities of modern times after a respectable show of criticism and resistance.
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  • The new cabinet convoked the Cortes elected under the administration of Canovas in 1884, and the Conservative majorities of both houses, at the request of Canovas, behaved very loyally, voting supplies and other bills necessary to enable the government to be carried on until another parliament could be elected in the following year, 1886.
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  • Canovas, who was consulted by the queen when Alonzo Martinez failed, faithfully carried out the pact of El Pardo and advised Her Majesty to send for Sagasta again, as he alone could, carry out what remained to be done of the Liberal programme.
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  • Canovas gathered round him most oi the prominent Conservalive and Catholic statesmen.
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  • This was the case with most of the products of agriculture and with live stock, so Canovas and his finance minister made, by royal decree, an enormous increase in the duties on these classes of imports, and particularly on breadstuffs.
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  • The split in the Conservative camp originated in the rivalry between the two principal lieutenants of Canovas, Romero Robledo and Francisco Silvela.
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  • The latter and a strong and influential body of Conservatives, chiefly young politicians, dissented from the easy-going views of Romero Robledo and of Canovas on the expediency of reforms to correct the notorious and old-standing abuses and corruption of the municipalities, especially of Madrid.
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  • When Canovas found himself deserted on so delicate a matter by a numerous section of his party, he resigned, and advised the queen to send for Sagasta and the Liberals.
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  • Neither the war minister nor the commanders of the garrison chose to punish the offenders, and sooner than endorse such want of discipline, Sagasta and the Liberal party once more made way for Canovas.
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  • A very few days after he assumed office Canovas received information concerning the spread of the rising in Cuba which induced him to send out Marshal Campos with 30,000 men.
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  • Canovas so fully comprehended the necessity of averting American intervention that he listened to the pressing demands of secretary Olney and of the American minister in Madrid, Hannis Taylor, an.d laid before the Cortes a bill introducing home rule in Cuba on a more liberal scale than Maura, Abarzuza and Sagasta had dared to suggest two years before.
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  • Canovas did not live to see his scheme put into practice, as he was assassinated by an anarchist at the baths of Santa Agueda, in the Basque Provinces, on the 9th of August 1897.
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  • The queen-regent appointed General Azcarraga, the war minister, as successor to Canovas; and a few weeks later President McKinley sent General Woodford as representative of the United States at the court of Madrid.
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  • The task of reorganization was confided by the queen-regent to Seor Silvela, who had been universally recognized as the leader of the Conservatives and Catholics after the death of Canovas del Castillo.
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  • Silvela endeavoured to unite in what he styled a Modern Conservative party the bulk of the followers of Canovas; the Ultramontanes, who were headed by General Polavieja and Seor Pidal; the Catalan Regionalists, whose leader, Duran y Bas, became a cabinet minister; and his own personal following, of whom the most prominent were the home secretary, Seor Dato, and the talented and energetic finance minister, Seor Villaverde, upon whose shoulders rested the heaviest part of the task of the new cabinet.
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  • Silvela lacked the energy and decision which had been the characteristics of Canovas.
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  • The article in question forbade external signs or public manifestations of all religious confessions with the exception of that of th~ state., which was defined by Canovas del Castillo as meaning any emblem, attribute or lettering which would appear on the exterior walls of dissident places of worship. 2 In the speech from the throne at the opening of the new Cortes (June 16) the king declared that his government would strive to give expression to the i The composition of the new parliament was as followsSenate:
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  • His uncle, Don Serafin Estebanez Calderon, found him a situation as clerk in the Madrid-Aranjuez railway, but Canovas soon took to journalism and literature, earning enough to support himself and pay for his law studies at the Madrid University.
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  • Canovas entered the Cortes in 1854; he was made governor of Cadiz in 1857, sub-director of the state department in 1858, under-secretary at the home office in 1860, minister of the interior in 1864, minister of the colonies in 1865, minister of finance in 1866, and was exiled by Marshal Narvaez in the same year, afterwards becoming a bitter opponent of all the reactionary cabinets until the revolution of 1868.
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  • After the abdication of Amadeus and the proclamation of the federal republic, Canovas took the lead of the propaganda in favour of the restoration of the Bourbons, and was their principal agent and adviser.
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  • Sagasta thereupon caused Canovas to be arrested(30thof December 1874); but the next day the Madrid garrison also proclaimed Alphonso XII.
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  • He formed a regency ministry pending the arrival of his majesty, who confirmed his appointment, and for six years Canovas was premier except during the short-lived cabinets of Marshal Jovellar in 1875 and Marshal Campos for a few months in 1879.
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  • Canovas was, in fact, the soul of the Restoration.
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  • Canovas crowned his policy by countenancing the formation of a Liberal party under Sagasta, flanked by Marshal Serrano and other Liberal generals, which took office in 1881.
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  • In 1890 Canovas took office under the queen regent, and one of his first acts was to reverse the tariff policy of the Liberals, denouncing all the treaties of commerce, and passing in 1892 a highly protectionist tariff.
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  • Splits in the Conservative ranks forced Canovas to resign at the end of 1893, and Sagasta came in for eighteen months.
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  • Canovas resumed office in March 1895 immediately after the outbreak of the Cuban insurrection, and devoted most of his time and efforts, with characteristic determination, to the preparation of ways and means for sending 200,000 men to the West Indies to carry out his stern and unflinching policy of no surrender, no concessions and no reforms. He was making up his mind for another effort to enable General Weyler to enforce the reforms that had been wrung from the Madrid government, more by American diplomacy than from a sense of the inevitable, when the bullet of an anarchist, in August 1897, at the baths of Santa Agueda, cut short his career.
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  • On the whole, Canovas must be regarded as the greatest Spanish statesman of the close of the 19th century.
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  • On his return from that island he presided over a Conservative cabinet for a few months, but soon made way for Canovas, whom he ever afterwards treated as the leader of the Conservative party.
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  • When the Cuban rising in 1895 assumed a serious aspect, he was sent out by the Conservative cabinet of Canovas to cope with the rebellion, but he failed in the field, as well as in his efforts to win over the Creoles, chiefly because he was not allowed to give them local self-government, as he wished.
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