Cange sentence example

cange
  • meant proprietas (see Du Cange).
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  • See Du Cange, Glossariurn mediae et infimae latinitatis (new ed.,.
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  • The procession was followed, inside the church, by a curious combination of ritual office and mystery play, the text of which, according to the Ordo processionis asinorum secundum Rothomagensem usum, is given in Du Cange.
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  • 1903); Du Cange, Glossarium (ed.
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  • Farlatus and others, Illyricum Sacrum (Venice, 1751-1819); C. du Fresne du Cange, Illyricum vetus et novum (1746); M.
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  • the Bavarian on Castrucio de' Antelminelli, duke of Lucca, and his heirs male, was official as well as honorary, being charged with the attendance and service to be performed at the palace at the emperor's coronation at Rome (Du Cange, s.v.
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  • See Selden, Titles of Honor (London, 1672); Du Cange, Glossarium Med.
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  • The origin of the office of capellanus or cappellanus in the medieval church is generally traced (see Du Cange, Gloss.
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  • reverendus do not confine the term to those in orders; Du Cange (Gloss.
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  • Nothing is positively known of his ancestry, for the supposition (originating with Du Cange) that a certain William, marshal of Champagne between 1163 and 1179, was his father appears to be erroneous.
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  • riscus, rischium, and risicum are found, according to Du Cange (Gloss., qq.v.), as early as the 13th century.
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  • (See Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.
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  • 4; Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.
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  • See Hefele's Concilien, passim; Du Cange, Glossary, article "Baptisterium"; Eusebius, Hist.
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  • are found picotinus, " mensura frumentaria," and picotus, " mensura liquidorum" (Du Cange, Gloss.
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  • Meineke (1836), with du Cange's valuable commentary; Migne, Patrologia Graeca, cxxvii.; see also J.
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  • In the 17th century the erudition of France is best represented by "Henricus Valesius," Du Cange and Mabillon.
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  • See Du Cange, Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis, new edition by L.
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  • The word occurs in the Regula Columbani (c. 7), and du Cange gives a few other cases of its use in Latin documents, but it never came into vogue in the West.
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  • In ecclesiastical Latin nonnus was used by the younger members of a religious community for their elders, and so, in the regula of St Benedict, cap. 62, Juniores autem Priores suos nonnos vocant quod intelligitur paterna reverentia (Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.
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  • Reifferscheid (1839-1878), with Du Cange's valuable commentary; and Teubner series, by A.
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  • CHARLES DU FRESNE DU CANGE, Sieur (1610-1688), one of the lay members of the great 17th century group of French critics and scholars who laid the foundations of modern historical criticism, was born at Amiens on the 18th of December 1610.
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  • In the archives of Paris Du Cange was able to consult charters, diplomas, manuscripts and a multitude of printed documents, which were not to be met.
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  • His last work, Chronicon Paschale a mundo condito ad Heraclii imperatoris annum vigesimum (Paris, 1689), was passing through the press when Du Cange died, and consequently it was edited by Etienne Baluze, and published with an eloge of the author prefixed.
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  • The French government, however, aware of the importance of all the writings of Du Cange, succeeded, after much trouble, in collecting the greater portion of the manuscripts, which were preserved in the imperial library at Paris.
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  • The works of Du Cange published after his death are: an edition of the Byzantine historian, Nicephorus Gregoras (Paris, 1702); De imperatorum Constantinopolitanorum seu inferioris aevi vel imperii uti vocant numismatibus dissertatio (Rome, 1755); Histoire de l'Nat de la y ule d'Amiens et de ses comtes (Amiens, 1840); and a valuable work Des principautes d'outre-mer, published by E.
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  • 27-29; Anna Comnena's Life; see also Du Cange, Familiae Byzantinae; Friedrich Wilken, Rerum ab Alexio I., Joanne, Manuele et Alexio II.
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  • 1044, quoted by Du Cange s.v.
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  • The thegn, the ealdorman, the king himself, fought on foot; the horse might bear him to the field, but when the fighting 2 Du Cange, Gloss., s.v.
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  • The bachelor and the banneret were both equally knights, only the one was of greater distinction and authority 3 Du Cange, Dissertation, xxi., and Lancelot du Lac, among other romances.
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  • The derivation of " adouber," corresponding to " dub," from " adoptare," which is given by Du Cange, and would connect the ceremony with " adoptio per arma," is certainly inaccurate.
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  • Hence Du Cange divides the medieval nobility of France and Spain into three classes: first, barons or ricos hombres; secondly, chevaliers or caballeros; and thirdly, ecuyers or infanzons; and to the first, who with their several special titles constituted the greater nobility of either country, he limits the designation of banneret and the right of leading their followers to war under a banner, otherwise a " drapeau quarre " or square flag.
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  • In England all the barons or greater nobility were entitled to bear banners, and therefore Du Cange's observations would apply to them as well as to the barons or greater nobility of France and Spain.
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  • But in the French Gesta Romanorum the warlike form alone is given, and it is quoted by both Selden and Du Cange.
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  • 4 Du Cange, Dissertation, ix.; Selden, Titles of Honor, p. 452; Daniel, Milice Francoise, i.
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  • 5 Du Cange, s.v.
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  • trans., Edinburgh, 1853), with useful excerpts from documents; Du Cange, Glossarium; Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopadie (3rd ed., 1897) s.
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  • See Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.
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  • The word, however, survived in its general sense of "office" or "administration," and it was even used during the middle ages for "parish" (see Du Cange, Glossarium, s.
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  • (1840); Du Cange, Glossarium, s.
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  • m; Du Cange, Glossarium med.
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  • In the early Church other bishops commonly described themselves as vicars of Christ (Du Cange gives an example as late as the 9th century from the capitularies of Charles the Bald); but there is no proof in their case, or indeed in that of " vicar of St Peter " given to the popes, that it was part of their formal style.
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  • In the 4th and 5th centuries it was frequently used in the West of any q y }' bishop (Du Cange, s.v.); but it gradually came to be reserved to the bishop of Rome, becoming his official title.
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  • canonizata, du Cange], ultima, poenosa, luctuosa, nigra, inofficiosa, muta, crucis, lamentationum, indulgentiae), in the Christian ecclesiastical year the week immediately preceding Easter.
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  • In some codices the text runs: " Per parochias concessit licentiam benedicendi Cereum Paschalem "(Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.
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  • 50 Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.
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  • of France arranged a treaty with the sultan of Egypt under which French consuls were established at Tripoli and Alexandria, and Du Cange cites a charter of James of Aragon, dated 1268, granting to the city of Barcelona the right to elect consuls in partibus ultramarinis, &c. The free growth of the system was, however, hampered by commercial and dynastic rivalries.
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  • Meineke (1836), with Du Cange's valuable notes; Migne, Patrologia Graeca, cxxxiii.; see also C. Neumann, Griechische Geschichtsschreiber im Jahrhundert (1888); H.
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  • Besides those quoted in the notes, the reader may consult with advantage Du Cange's Glossarium, s.v.
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  • Du Cange: " La situation d'un Defini ious etat a l'egard d'un autre moans puissant auquel it a promis son appui d'une maniere permanent " (Gairal, of r o t ec' P 2 a definition applicable only to certain simple torate.
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  • Processio is used by Cicero in the sense of "a marching forward, an advance," any public progress, such as the formal entrance of the consul upon his office (Du Cange, s.v.
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  • for the assembly of the people in the church (Du Cange, s.v.).
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  • " Processions," "Stations," "Translations" for details of processions under Constantine, and Du Cange, s.v.
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  • See, Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.
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  • Du Cange, in his glossary, also gives us Abbas Campanilis, Clocherii, Palatii, Scholaris, &c.
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  • See Joseph Bingham, Origines ecclesiasticae (1840); Du Cange, Glossarium med.
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  • A ' For cases see du Cange, Glossarium, s.
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  • - On Constantinople generally, besides the regular guide-books and works already mentioned, see P. Gyllius, De topographia Constantinopoleos, De Bosporo Thracio (1632); Du Cange, Constantinopolis Christiana (1680); J.
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  • 108; Du Cange, Gloss.
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  • See Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue francaise (Paris, 1895), for numerous examples of the use of the word vassal; also Du Cange, Glossarium, s.
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  • byzantinae, with Du Cange's preface and commentary; J.
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  • As an ecclesiastical title rector was once loosely used for rulers of the Church generally, whether bishops, abbots or parish priests (see Du Cange, Rectores ecclesiarum).
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  • In the early Christian Church each district was administered by a bishop and his attendant presbyters and deacons, and the word parochia was frequently applied to 'such a district (Du Cange, sub.
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  • a duke or the prefect of the city of Rome (Du Cange, Gloss.
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  • See Selden, Titles of Honor (3rd ed., London, 1672), p. 656; Du Cange, Glossarium (Niort, 1883), s.v.
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  • Du Cange, Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis, ed.
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  • See du Cange, Glossarium, s.
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  • Luchaire, Manuel des institutions francaises (Paris, 1892); Du Cange, Glossarium (ed.
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  • In the r 2th century a magister justitiarius also appears in the Norman kingdom of Sicily, title and office being probably borrowed from England; he presided over the royal court (Magna curia) and was, with his assistants, empowered to decide, inter alia, all cases reserved to the Crown (see Du Cange, s.v.
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  • of England; Du Cange, Glossarium (Niort, 1885) s.v.
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  • of France was styled venerabilis and venerandus (see Du Cange, Gloss.
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  • Mitra, even as late as the 15th century, retained its simple meaning of cap (see Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.); to Isidore of Seville it is specifically a woman's cap. Infula, which in late ecclesiastical usage was to be confined to mitre (and its dependent bands) and chasuble, meant originally a piece of cloth, or the sacred fillets used in pagan worship, and later on came to be used of any ecclesiastical vestment, and there is no evidence for its specific application to the liturgical head-dress earlier than the 12th century.
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  • officina meant a workshop, manufactory, laboratory, and in medieval monastic Latin was applied to a general store-room (see Du Cange, Gloss., s.v.); it thus became applied to a shop where goods were sold rather than a place where things were made.
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  • Du Cange discovered and quoted a deed of donation by him dated 1207, by which certain properties were devised to the churches of Notre Dame de Foissy and Notre Dame de Troyes, with the reservation of life interests to his daughters Alix and Damerones, and his sisters Emmeline and Haye, all of whom appear to have embraced a monastic life.
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  • But both these were completely antiquated by the great edition of Du Cange in 1657, wherein that learned writer employed all his knowledge, never since equalled, of the subject, but added a translation, or rather paraphrase, into modern French which is scarcely worthy either of himself or his author.
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  • Dom Brial gave a new edition from different MS. sources in 1823, and the book figures with different degrees of dependence on Du Cange and Brial in the collections of Petitot, Buchon, and Michaud and Poujoulat.
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  • Du Cange (Gloss., s.v.
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  • Du Cange took considerable interest in the history of the later empire, and wrote Historia Byzantina duplici commentario illustrata (Paris, 1680), and an introduction to his edition and translation into modern French of Geoffrey de Villehardouin's Histoire de l'empire de Constantinople sous les empereurs francais (Paris, 1657).
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  • 3 Du Cange, Gloss., s.v.
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  • 2 Du Cange, Dissertation sur Joinville, xxi.; Sainte Palaye, Memoires, i.
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  • Zeumer, p. 55) and from various provisions of the Salic law (see du Cange, Glossarium, s.
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  • (See APPRO PRIATION.) See Du Cange, Glossarium mediae et infiniae Latinitatis, ed.
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  • It is pointed out that the word missa long continued to be applied to any church service, and more particularly to the lections (see Du Cange for numerous examples), and it is held that such services received their name of missal from the solemn form of dismissal with which it was customary to conclude them; thus, in the 4th century Pilgrimage of Etheria (Silvia) the word missa is used indiscriminately of the Eucharist, other services, and the ceremony of dismissal.
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  • bydel, from beodan, to hid), originally a subordinate officer of a court or deliberative assembly, who summoned persons to appear and answer charges against them (see Du Cange, supra tit.
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  • This, indeed, was its original meaning, the cappa having been an outer garment common to men and women whether clerical or lay (see Du Cange, Glossarium, s.v.).
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