Cambrensis sentence example

cambrensis
  • At least Giraldus Cambrensis, the Norman Welshman or Welsh Norman, was certainly more alive to the distinction between Normans and English than any other of his contemporaries.
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  • lvii.), and in Archaeologia Cambrensis for 1908.
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  • As to the castle and the Black and Gray Friars see Archaeologia Cambrensis, 3rd series, viii.
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  • The first castellan of this new stronghold was Giraldus de Windsor, husband of the Princess Nest of South Wales and grandfather of Giraldus Cambrensis.
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  • The last reference to him, as living, is in 1208, when an order for payment to him is on record, but Giraldus Cambrensis, in the second edition of his Hibernica, redacted in 1210, utters a prayer for his soul, "cujus animae propitietur Deus," a proof that he was no longer alive.
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  • Brewer (Preface to Works of Giraldus Cambrensis, Rolls Series, iv.) and F.
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  • As authority Thomas cites a certain Breri, who has now been identified with the Bleheris quoted as authority for the Grail and Gawain stories, and the Bledhericus referred to by Giraldus Cambrensis as famosus ille fabulator.
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  • Among Latin scholars of the next generation we have Giraldus Cambrensis (d.
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  • Among his publications were the well-known quarterly magazine Y Traethodydd (" The Essayist"), Gwyddoniadur Cymreig (" Encyclopaedia Cambrensis"), and Dr Silvan Evans's English-Welsh Dictionary (1868), but his greatest achievement in this field was the newspaper Baner Cymru (" The Banner of Wales"), founded in 1857 and amalgamated with Yr Amserau (" The Times") two years later.
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  • The original authorities for Henry's life are Robert de Torigni, Chronica; Giraldus Cambrensis, De instructione principum, Guil- laume le Marechal (ed.
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  • The Welsh triads know no fewer than three Gwenhwyfars; Giraldus Cambrensis, relating the discovery of the royal tombs at Glastonbury, speaks of the body found as that of Arthur's second wife; the prose Merlin gives Guenevere a bastard half-sister of the same name, who strongly resembles her; and the Lancelot relates how this lady, trading on the likeness, persuaded Arthur that she was the true daughter of Leodegrance, and the queen the bastard interloper.
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  • Similar absorptions no doubt account for the disappearance of the Culdees of York, a name borne by the canons of St Peter's about 925, and of Snowdon and Bardsey Island in north Wales mentioned by Giraldus Cambrensis (c. 1190) in his Speculum Ecclesiae and Itinerarium respectively.
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  • ii.; Giraldus Cambrensis, De Vita Galfridi; Stubbs' Preface to Roger of Hoveden, vol.
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  • But in 1199 the celebrated Gerald de Barri (Giraldus Cambrensis), archdeacon of Brecon and a member of the famous Norman baronial house of de Barri, and also through his grandmother Nesta a great-grandson of Prince Rhys ap Tudor of Deheubarth, was elected bishop by the chapter of St Davids.
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  • In addition to these works Camden compiled a Greek grammar, Institutio Graecae Grammatices Compendiaria, which became very popular, and he published an edition of the writings of Asser, Giraldus Cambrensis, Thomas Walsingham and others, under the title, Anglica, Hibernica, Normannica, Cambrica, a veteribus scripta, published at Frankfort in 1602, and again in 1603.
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  • As early at least as the beginning of the Ilth century the tradition that Arthur was buried at Glastonbury appears to have taken shape; and in the reign of Henry II., according to Giraldus Cambrensis and others, the abbot Henry de Blois, causing search to be made, discovered at the depth of 16 ft.
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  • Gawain, included in the continuation to Chretien's Perceval by Wauchier de Denain, and attributed to Bleheris the Welshman, who is probably identical with the Bledhericus of Giraldus Cambrensis, and considerably earlier than Chretien de Troyes.
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  • The identity of this Bleheris with the Bledhericus mentioned by Giraldus Cambrensis as Famosus ille fabulator, living at a bygone and unspecified date, and with the Breri quoted by Thomas as authority for the Tristan story, has been fully accepted by leading French scholars.
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  • GIRALDUS CAMBRENSIS (1146 ?-1220), medieval historian, also called Gerald De Barri, was born in Pembrokeshire.
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  • It may, however, be mentioned that Giraldus Cambrensis and the Speculum Regale state in all seriousness that certain of the inhabitants of Ossory were able at will to assume the form of wolves, and similar stories are not infrequent in Irish romance.
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  • Giraldus Cambrensis, in his gives what purports to be the text of this letter, known as " the Bull Laudabiliter," and adds further Privilegium of Pope Alexander III.
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  • Nesta's daughter, Angareth, married to William de Barri, bore the chronicler Giraldus Cambrensis, and was ancestress of the Irish Barries.
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  • The Topographia and Expugnatio of Giraldus Cambrensis (Rolls series) are chiefly valuable for his account of the Anglo-Norman invaders and for descriptions of the country.
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  • According to Giraldus Cambrensis, Roger de Bellesme, a follower of William I., afterwards created earl of Shrewsbury, imported some stallions from Spain into England; their produce was celebrated by Drayton the poet.
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  • Giraldus Cambrensis, whose acquaintance he had made, introduced him, before 1199, to William de Vere, bishop of Hereford.
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  • De nugis is a comparatively small book; if it were difficult to find leisure for that, much more would it have been difficult to find the time requisite for the composition of one only of the many long-winded romances which have been fathered on Map. Giraldus Cambrensis, with whom he was on most friendly terms, and who frequently refers to and quotes him, records a speech in which Map contrasted Giraldus' labours with his own, apparently to the disadvantage of the latter, "vos scripta dedistis, et nos verba" - a phrase which has been interpreted as meaning that Map himself had produced no literary work.
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  • Thomas, History of Diocese of St Asaph (London, 1874), p. 5; Index of Llyfr Coch Asaph, Archaeologia Cambrensis, 3rd series, 1868, vol.
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  • In the 1100s, Irish folklorist Giraldus of Cambrensis tells the story of The Werewolves of Ossory where a priest and a young novice encounter werewolves while traveling in Ireland.
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