Calpurnius sentence example

calpurnius
  • Titus Calpurnius >>
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  • He was the son of a deacon, Calpurnius, and the grandson of a presbyter named Potitus.
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  • Nothing from his works has been preserved; the Laus Pisonis, which has been attributed to him, is probably by Titus Calpurnius Siculus (J.
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  • Lucius Calpurnius Bestia, Roman tribune of the people in 121 B.C., consul in III.
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  • Lucius Calpurnius Bestia, one of the Catilinarian conspirators, possibly a grandson of the above.
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  • This Bestia is probably not the Lucius Calpurnius Bestia, aedile, and a candidate for the praetorship in 57.
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  • Calpurnius Siculus, written at the beginning of the reign of Nero, which are not without grace and facility of diction.
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  • Calpurnius, 6 columns of which, with their Corinthian capitals, still exist.
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  • (or C.) Calpurnius Crassus, but he contented himself with a hint to the conspirators that their designs were known, and with banishing Crassus to Tarentum.
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  • Calpurnius Piso as the fittest man to succeed him.
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  • The bestknown of those who bore it was Marcus Calpurnius Bibulus, consul with Julius Caesar, 59 B.C. He was the candidate put forward by the aristocratical party in opposition to L.
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  • The two eldest were murdered in Egypt by some of the soldiery of Gabinius; the youngest, Lucius Calpurnius Bibulus, fought on the side of the republic at the battle of Philippi, but surrendered to Antony soon afterwards, and was by him appointed to the command of his fleet.
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  • Calpurnius Piso, governor of Syria.
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  • family of Calpurnius Piso.
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  • 'She was married in 63 B.C. to C. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, whom Cicero found a model son-in-law.
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  • Their chosen leader, whom they destined to succeed Nero, was C. Calpurnius Piso, a handsome, wealthy and popular noble, and a boon companion of Nero himself.
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  • Calpurnius Piso, his colleague in the consulship (67), he brought forward a severe law (Lex Acilia Calpurnia) against illegal canvassing at elections.
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  • Calpurnius Piso, tribune in 149 B.C. and consul in 133 B.C., prided himself on reducing the old legends to the level of common sense, and importing into them valuable moral lessons for his own generation.
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  • As to the first decade, it is generally agreed that in the first and second books, at any rate, he follows such older and simpler writers as Fabius Pictor and Calpurnius Piso (the only ones whom he there refers to by name), to whom, so far as the first book is concerned, Niebuhr (Lectures, p 33) would add the poet Ennius.
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  • At the same time Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, one of the most violent and ambitious of the old nobility, was sent as governor of Syria to watch his movements.
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  • Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, Roman statesman, was consul in 7 B.C., and subsequently governor of Spain and proconsul of Africa.
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  • GAius CALPURNIUS Piso, Roman statesman, orator and patron of literature in the 1st century A.D., is known chiefly for his share in the conspiracy of A.D.
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  • It is probably the last-named who is referred to by Calpurnius Siculus under the name of Meliboeus, and he is the subject of the panegyric De laude Pisonis.
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  • He edited a number of classical authors: Pedo Albinovanus (1783), Pindar and the Scholia (1792-1795), Aristophanes (with others, 1794, &c.), Euripides (1778-1788), Apollonius Rhodius (1797), Demosthenes De Pace (1799), Plato (1813-1819), Cicero (1795-1807), Titus Calpurnius Siculus (1803).
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  • Calpurnius Piso, surnamed Frugi (see under Piso), wrote seven books of annals, relating the history of the city from its foundation down to his own times.
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  • Calpurnius Piso Frugi (consul 133, censor 108), C. Sempronius Tuditanus (consul 129), Cn.
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  • Lucius Calpurnius Piso, surnamed Frugi (the worthy), Roman statesman and historian, was tribune in 149 B.C. He is known chiefly for his lex Calpurnia repetundarum, which brought about the system of quaestiones perpetuae and a new phase of criminal procedure.
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  • He was a friend of Calpurnius Piso, and was implicated in his profligacy by Cicero (in Pisonem, 29), who, however, praises him warmly for his philosophic views and for the elegans lascivia of his poems (cf.
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