Callendar sentence example

callendar
  • 2 was constructed by Callendar and Nicolson with this object.
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  • The Peculiar Advantage Of The Electric Method Of Callendar And Barnes, Already Referred To, Is That The Specific Heat Itself Is Determined Over A Range Of 8° To 10° At Each Point, By Adding Accurately Measured Quantities Of Heat To The Water At The Desired Temperature In An Isothermal Enclosure, Under Perfectly Steady Conditions, Without Any Possibility Of Evaporation Or Loss Of Heat In Transference.
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  • The Value 4.180 Joules At 20° C. Is The Mean Between Rowland'S Corrected Result 4.181 And The Value 4.179, Deduced From The Experiments Of Reynolds And Moorby On The Assumption That The Ratio Of The Mean Specific Heat O° To 100° To That At 20° Is 1.043'6, As Given By The Formulae Representing The Results Of Callendar And Barnes.
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  • Callendar Has, However, Devised A Continuous Method Of Mixture, Which Appears To Be Peculiarly Adapted To The Purpose, And Promises To Give More Certain Results.
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  • It appears that the relatively enormous deviations of CaC1 2 from Raoult's law are accounted for on the hypothesis that a=9, but there is a slight uncertainty about the degree of ionization of the strongest solutions at-50° C. Cane-sugar appears to require 5 molecules of water of hydration both at o° C. and at loo° C., whereas KC1 and NaCI take more water at loo° C. than at o° C. The cases considered by Callendar (loc. cit.) are necessarily limited, because the requisite data for strong solutions are comparatively scarce.
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  • The highest pressures recorded for cane-sugar are nearly three times as great as those given by van't Hoff's formula for the gas-pressure, but agree very well with the vapour-pressure theory, as modified by Callendar, provided that we substitute for V in Arrhenius's formula the actual specific volume of the solvent in the solution, and if we also assume that each molecule of sugar in solution combines with 5 molecules of water, as required by the observations on the depression of the freezing-point and the rise of the boiling-point.
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  • Employing this method, Callendar finds S = 0.497 for steam at one atmosphere Temperature Centigrade FIG.
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  • Callendar's experiments on the cooling effect for steam by the throttling calorimeter method gave n =3-33 and c =26.3 c.c. at 100° C. Grindley's experiments gave nearly the same average value of Q over his experimental range, but a rather larger value for n, namely, 3.8.
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  • The assumption n=s/R simplifies the adiabatic equation, but the value n=3.5 gives So =0.497 at zero pressure, which was the value found by Callendar experimentally at 108° C. and 1 atmosphere pressure.
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  • It is equivalent, as Callendar (loc. cit.) points out, to supposing that the variation of the specific heat is due to the formation and solution of a mass w/(v-w) of vapour molecules per unit mass of the liquid.
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  • But this neglects the latent heat of solution, unless we may suppose it included by writing the internal latent heat L i in place of L in Callendar's formula.
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  • In another form devised by Callendar," a revolving contact disk is placed on the shaft of an alternator, or of a synchronous motor driven by the alternating current under test.
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  • The Peculiar Advantage Of The Electric Method Of Callendar And Barnes, Already Referred To, Is That The Specific Heat Itself Is Determined Over A Range Of 8° To 10° At Each Point, By Adding Accurately Measured Quantities Of Heat To The Water At The Desired Temperature In An Isothermal Enclosure, Under Perfectly Steady Conditions, Without Any Possibility Of Evaporation Or Loss Of Heat In Transference.
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  • The Value 4.180 Joules At 20° C. Is The Mean Between Rowland'S Corrected Result 4.181 And The Value 4.179, Deduced From The Experiments Of Reynolds And Moorby On The Assumption That The Ratio Of The Mean Specific Heat O° To 100° To That At 20° Is 1.043'6, As Given By The Formulae Representing The Results Of Callendar And Barnes.
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  • These Units Differ Only By Ii Parts In 10,000 According To Callendar And Barnes, Or By 13 In Io,000 According To Rowland And Griffiths, So That The Difference Between Them Is Of No Great Importance For Ordinary Purposes.
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  • It appears that the relatively enormous deviations of CaC1 2 from Raoult's law are accounted for on the hypothesis that a=9, but there is a slight uncertainty about the degree of ionization of the strongest solutions at-50° C. Cane-sugar appears to require 5 molecules of water of hydration both at o° C. and at loo° C., whereas KC1 and NaCI take more water at loo° C. than at o° C. The cases considered by Callendar (loc. cit.) are necessarily limited, because the requisite data for strong solutions are comparatively scarce.
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  • Callendar's experiments on the cooling effect for steam by the throttling calorimeter method gave n =3-33 and c =26.3 c.c. at 100° C. Grindley's experiments gave nearly the same average value of Q over his experimental range, but a rather larger value for n, namely, 3.8.
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  • The assumption n=s/R simplifies the adiabatic equation, but the value n=3.5 gives So =0.497 at zero pressure, which was the value found by Callendar experimentally at 108° C. and 1 atmosphere pressure.
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  • According to Moray's version of the letter, Mary was to try to poison Darnley in a house on the way between Glasgow and Edinburgh where he and she were to stop. Clearly Lord Livingstone's house, Callendar, where they did rest on their journey, is intended.
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  • Callendar has shown that the variation of vapour pressure of a solution with pressure is given by the expression V'dP = vdp, where V' is the change in volume of the solution when unit mass of solvent is mixed with it.
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  • Callendar is to trace the effect of possible combination of molecules of solute with molecules of the solvent.
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  • Callendar finds that five molecules of water in the case of cane-sugar or two molecules in the case of dextrose are required to bring the curves into conformity with the observations of Berkeley and Hartley, which in fig.
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