Caecilius sentence example

caecilius
  • Caecilius Metellus was proconsul and earned a triumph after two years' fighting: but even in the time of Strabo there was considerable brigandage.
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  • Caecilius Metellus Pius, Marcus Licinius Crassus, Marcus Licinius Lucullus, joined Sulla, and in the following year (82) he won a decisive victory over the younger Marius near Praeneste (mod.
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  • [[[Caecilius]] Cyprianus, called Thascius j (c. 200-258), bishop of Carthage, one of the most illustrious in the early history of the church, and one of the most notable of its early martyrs, was born about the year 200, probably at.
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  • Caecilius Metellus Numidicus, who, when censor, endeavoured to remove Saturninus from the senate on the ground of immorality, but his colleague refused to assent.
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  • Pliny tells us that Caecilius, a freedman of the time of Augustus, left by his will as many as 4116.
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  • Tiro, the amanuensis of Cicero; Hyginus, the librarian of Augustus; Livius Andronicus, Caecilius, Statius, Terence, Publilius Syrus, Phaedrus and Epictetus.
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  • While he is never ranked as a writer of tragedy with Ennius, Pacuvius or Accius, he is placed in the canon of the grammarian Volcaaus Sedigitus third (immediately after Caecilius and Plautus) in the rank of Roman comic authors.
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  • The titles of most of them, like those of Plautus, and unlike those of Caecilius and Terence, are Latin, not Greek.
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  • Terence's earliest play was the Andria, exhibited in 166 B.C. A pretty, but perhaps apocryphal, story is told of his having read the play, before its exhibition, to Caecilius (who, after the death of Plautus, ranked as the foremost comic poet), and of the generous admiration of it manifested by Caecilius.
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  • 59): "Vincere Caecilius gravitate, Terentius arte."
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  • LACTANTIUS FIRMIANUS (c. 260 - c. 340), also called Lucius Caelius (or Caecilius) Lactantius Firmianus, was a Christian writer who from the beauty of his style has been called the "Christian Cicero."
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  • Many critics ascribe it to an unknown Lucius Caecilius; there are certainly serious differences of grammar, style and temper between it and the writings already mentioned.
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  • The work, begun by them, was carried on by younger contemporaries and successors; by Statius Caecilius (c.220-168), an Insubrian Gaul, in comedy; in tragedy by M.
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  • c. 61-c. 113), Latin author of the Letters and the Panegyric on Trajan, was the second son of Lucius Caecilius Cilo, by Plinia, the sister of the Elder Pliny.
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  • Cicero, who frequently quotes from him with great admiration, appears (De optimo genere oratorum, i.) to rank him first among the Roman tragic poets, as Ennius among the epic, and Caecilius among the comic poets.
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  • Teuffel, Caecilius Statius, Pacuvius, Attius, Afranius (1858); and Mommsen, History of Rome, bk.
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  • In the war with Jugurtha (109-106) he came to the front as lieutenant of the consul Quintus Caecilius Metellus Numidicus.
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  • Caecilius Metellus Pius in 82 B.C. In the census of Vespasian a woman of Faventia is said to have given her age as 135.
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  • Caecilius Metellus Diadematus (consul in 117 B.C.).
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  • Caecilius >>
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  • Caecilius Metellus, who soon reduced them to obedience, settled amongst them 3000 Roman and Spanish colonists, founded the cities of Palma and Pollentia (Pollensa), and introduced the cultivation of the olive.
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  • 23-79), the author of the Naturalis historia, was the son of a Roman by the daughter of the senator Gaius Caecilius of Novum Comum.
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  • Caecilius Jucundus.
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  • Caecilius, a candidate for the same office.
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  • He lived plainly and simply on the Aventine with the poet Caecilius Statius.
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  • Caecilius Metellus Pius, who had been specially sent against him from Rome, out of Lusitania, or Further Spain as the Romans called it.
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  • Caecilius Metellus Macedonicus, and again near Corinth by L.
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  • His mother was Caecilia, of the family of the Metelli, and sister of Quintus Caecilius Metellus Numidicus.
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  • CAECILIUS STATIUS, Or Statius Caecilius, Roman COI/11C poet, contemporary and intimate friend of Ennius, died in 168 (or 166) B.C. He was born in the territory of the Insubrian Gauls, and was probably taken as a prisoner to Rome (c. 200), during the great Gallic war.
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  • Originally a slave, he assumed the name of Caecilius from his patron, probably one of the Metelli.
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  • If the statement in the life of Terence by Suetonius is correct and the reading sound, Caecilius's judgment was so esteemed that he was ordered to hear Terence's Andria (exhibited 166 B.C.) read and to pronounce an opinion upon it.
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  • After several failures Caecilius gained a high reputation.
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  • 9 9) speaks somewhat disparagingly of him, and Cicero, although he admits with some hesitation that Caecilius may have been the chief of the comic poets (De Optimo Genere Oratorum, I), considers him inferior to Terence in style and Latinity (Ad Att.
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  • Caecilius holds a place between Plautus and Terence in his treatment of the Greek originals; he did not, like Plautus, confound things Greek and Roman, nor, like Terence, eliminate everything that could not be romanized.
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  • Teuffel, Caecilius Statius, &c. (1858): Mommsen, Hist.
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  • Caecilius Metellus (148), and fled to Thrace, whose prince gave him up to Rome.
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  • On his return to Rome, he took possession of an inheritance left him by his uncle and assumed the name of Quintus Caecilius Pomponianus.
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  • Caecilius Metellus before A.D.
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  • Caecilius Metellus (son of Scipio Nasica), the Roman general.
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  • Caecilianus (or Caecilius), a presbyter of Carthage, is supposed to have been the instrument of his conversion, which seems to have taken place about 246.
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  • The Letters of C. Plinius Caecilius Secundus or Pliny the Younger (61-c. 115), though they do not contradict the representation of Tacitus and Juvenal regarded as an exposure of the political degradation and moral corruption of prominent individuals and classes, do much to modify the pervadingly tragic and sombre character of their representation.
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  • PLINY Publius Caecilius Secundus, later known as Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus (A.D.
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  • It is to the following effect: Gaius Plinius Caecilius, son of Lucius, of the Ufentine tribe; augur; legate-propraetor of the province of Pontus and Bithynia, with consular power, by decree of the senate sent into the said province by the emperor Nerva Trajan; curator of the bed and banks of the Tiber and of the; praefect of the Treasury of Saturn; praefect of the Treasury of War;, tribune of the plebs; emperor's quaestor, sevir of the knights; military tribune of the Gallic legion; for the adjudication of; provided by will for the erection of baths at a cost of ., adding for the furnishing of the same 300,000 sesterces (2400) and furthermore, for maintenance, 200,000 sesterces (£1600); likewise, for the support of one hundred of his own freedmen to the township 1,866,666 sesterces (c. 15,000), the eventual accretions he devised to the townsfolk for a public entertainment;.
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  • The story is probably, like that of the visit of the young Terence to the veteran Caecilius, due to the invention of later grammarians; but it is invented in accordance wtih the traditionary criticism (Horace, Epp. ii.
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  • is above all a pure philosopher, but also a man of deep religious feeling, whose quest and goal are the knowledge of God; Celsus, the friend of Lucian, though sometimes called Epicurean and sometimes Platonist, is not a professed philosopher at all, but a man of the world, really at heart an agnostic, like Caecilius in Minucius Felix, whose religion is nothing more or less than the Empire.
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