Balashev sentence example

balashev
  • As the mazurka began, Boris saw that Adjutant General Balashev, one of those in closest attendance on the Emperor, went up to him and contrary to court etiquette stood near him while he was talking to a Polish lady.
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  • Having finished speaking to her, the Emperor looked inquiringly at Balashev and, evidently understanding that he only acted thus because there were important reasons for so doing, nodded slightly to the lady and turned to him.
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  • Hardly had Balashev begun to speak before a look of amazement appeared on the Emperor's face.
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  • He took Balashev by the arm and crossed the room with him, unconsciously clearing a path seven yards wide as the people on both sides made way for him.
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  • Boris noticed Arakcheev's excited face when the sovereign went out with Balashev.
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  • But the Emperor and Balashev passed out into the illuminated garden without noticing Arakcheev who, holding his sword and glancing wrathfully around, followed some twenty paces behind them.
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  • All the time Boris was going through the figures of the mazurka, he was worried by the question of what news Balashev had brought and how he could find it out before others.
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  • In the figure in which he had to choose two ladies, he whispered to Helene that he meant to choose Countess Potocka who, he thought, had gone out onto the veranda, and glided over the parquet to the door opening into the garden, where, seeing Balashev and the Emperor returning to the veranda, he stood still.
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  • At two in the morning of the fourteenth of June, the Emperor, having sent for Balashev and read him his letter to Napoleon, ordered him to take it and hand it personally to the French Emperor.
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  • Having set off in the small hours of the fourteenth, accompanied by a bugler and two Cossacks, Balashev reached the French outposts at the village of Rykonty, on the Russian side of the Niemen, by dawn.
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  • A French noncommissioned officer of hussars, in crimson uniform and a shaggy cap, shouted to the approaching Balashev to halt.
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  • Balashev did not do so at once, but continued to advance along the road at a walking pace.
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  • Balashev mentioned who he was.
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  • Balashev looked around him, awaiting the arrival of an officer from the village.
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  • The French colonel with difficulty repressed a yawn, but was polite and evidently understood Balashev's importance.
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  • The colonel said that the commander of the division was a mile and a quarter away and would receive Balashev and conduct him to his destination.
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  • This man rode toward Balashev at a gallop, his plumes flowing and his gems and gold lace glittering in the bright June sunshine.
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  • Balashev was only two horses' length from the equestrian with the bracelets, plumes, necklaces, and gold embroidery, who was galloping toward him with a theatrically solemn countenance, when Julner, the French colonel, whispered respectfully: "The King of Naples!"
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  • The colonel respectfully informed His Majesty of Balashev's mission, whose name he could not pronounce.
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  • He laid his hand on the withers of Balashev's horse and said:
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  • "Your Majesty," replied Balashev, "my master, the Emperor, does not desire war and as Your Majesty sees..." said Balashev, using the words Your Majesty at every opportunity, with the affectation unavoidable in frequently addressing one to whom the title was still a novelty.
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  • He dismounted, took Balashev's arm, and moving a few steps away from his suite, which waited respectfully, began to pace up and down with him, trying to speak significantly.
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  • Balashev replied that there was "nothing offensive in the demand, because..." but Murat interrupted him.
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  • Balashev told him why he considered Napoleon to be the originator of the war.
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  • Balashev rode on, supposing from Murat's words that he would very soon be brought before Napoleon himself.
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  • Davout allowed himself that pleasure when Balashev was brought in.
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  • He became still more absorbed in his task when the Russian general entered, and after glancing over his spectacles at Balashev's face, which was animated by the beauty of the morning and by his talk with Murat, he did not rise or even stir, but scowled still more and sneered malevolently.
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  • When he noticed in Balashev's face the disagreeable impression this reception produced, Davout raised his head and coldly asked what he wanted.
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  • Balashev took out the packet containing the Emperor's letter and laid it on the table (made of a door with its hinges still hanging on it, laid across two barrels).
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  • "You are perfectly at liberty to treat me with respect or not," protested Balashev, "but permit me to observe that I have the honor to be adjutant general to His Majesty...."
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  • Davout glanced at him silently and plainly derived pleasure from the signs of agitation and confusion which appeared on Balashev's face.
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  • A minute later the marshal's adjutant, de Castres, came in and conducted Balashev to the quarters assigned him.
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  • Four days before, sentinels of the Preobrazhensk regiment had stood in front of the house to which Balashev was conducted, and now two French grenadiers stood there in blue uniforms unfastened in front and with shaggy caps on their heads, and an escort of hussars and uhlans and a brilliant suite of aides-de-camp, pages, and generals, who were waiting for Napoleon to come out, were standing at the porch, round his saddle horse and his Mameluke, Rustan.
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  • Napoleon received Balashev in the very house in Vilna from which Alexander had dispatched him on his mission.
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  • Though Balashev was used to imperial pomp, he was amazed at the luxury and magnificence of Napoleon's court.
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  • The Comte de Turenne showed him into a big reception room where many generals, gentlemen-in-waiting, and Polish magnates--several of whom Balashev had seen at the court of the Emperor of Russia--were waiting.
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  • After some minutes, the gentleman-in-waiting who was on duty came into the great reception room and, bowing politely, asked Balashev to follow him.
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  • Balashev went into a small reception room, one door of which led into a study, the very one from which the Russian Emperor had dispatched him on his mission.
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  • It was plain that Balashev's personality did not interest him at all.
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  • Judging by the calmly moderate and amicable tone in which the French Emperor spoke, Balashev was firmly persuaded that he wished for peace and intended to enter into negotiations.
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  • When Napoleon, having finished speaking, looked inquiringly at the Russian envoy, Balashev began a speech he had prepared long before: Sire!
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  • Balashev recovered himself and began to speak.
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  • Here Balashev hesitated: he remembered the words the Emperor Alexander had not written in his letter, but had specially inserted in the rescript to Saltykov and had told Balashev to repeat to Napoleon.
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  • Balashev remembered these words, "So long as a single armed foe remains on Russian soil," but some complex feeling restrained him.
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  • During the speech that followed, Balashev, who more than once lowered his eyes, involuntarily noticed the quivering of Napoleon's left leg which increased the more Napoleon raised his voice.
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  • "The withdrawal of your army beyond the Niemen, sire," replied Balashev.
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  • "So now you want me to retire beyond the Niemen--only the Niemen?" repeated Napoleon, looking straight at Balashev.
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  • He went in silence from one corner of the room to the other and again stopped in front of Balashev.
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  • Balashev noticed that his left leg was quivering faster than before and his face seemed petrified in its stern expression.
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  • Balashev bowed his head affirmatively.
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  • He looked compassionately at Balashev, and as soon as the latter tried to make some rejoinder hastily interrupted him.
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  • Balashev knew how to reply to each of Napoleon's remarks, and would have done so; he continually made the gesture of a man wishing to say something, but Napoleon always interrupted him.
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  • To the alleged insanity of the Swedes, Balashev wished to reply that when Russia is on her side Sweden is practically an island: but Napoleon gave an angry exclamation to drown his voice.
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  • Balashev began to feel uncomfortable: as envoy he feared to demean his dignity and felt the necessity of replying; but, as a man, he shrank before the transport of groundless wrath that had evidently seized Napoleon.
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  • Balashev stood with downcast eyes, looking at the movements of Napoleon's stout legs and trying to avoid meeting his eyes.
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  • He paused, looked ironically straight into Balashev's eyes, and said in a quiet voice:
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  • Balashev, feeling it incumbent on him to reply, said that from the Russian side things did not appear in so gloomy a light.
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  • Balashev said that in Russia the best results were expected from the war.
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  • When Balashev had ended, Napoleon again took out his snuffbox, sniffed at it, and stamped his foot twice on the floor as a signal.
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  • Napoleon, without giving them a glance, turned to Balashev:
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  • But, to his surprise, Balashev received, through Duroc, an invitation to dine with the Emperor that day.
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  • Napoleon met Balashev cheerfully and amiably.
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  • He not only showed no sign of constraint or self-reproach on account of his outburst that morning, but, on the contrary, tried to reassure Balashev.
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  • In the course of conversation he mentioned Moscow and questioned Balashev about the Russian capital, not merely as an interested traveler asks about a new city he intends to visit, but as if convinced that Balashev, as a Russian, must be flattered by his curiosity.
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  • "The Russians are very devout," replied Balashev.
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  • Balashev respectfully ventured to disagree with the French Emperor.
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  • "I beg your Majesty's pardon," returned Balashev, "besides Russia there is Spain, where there are also many churches and monasteries."
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  • This reply of Balashev's, which hinted at the recent defeats of the French in Spain, was much appreciated when he related it at Alexander's court, but it was not much appreciated at Napoleon's dinner, where it passed unnoticed.
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  • So little was his rejoinder appreciated that Napoleon did not notice it at all and naively asked Balashev through what towns the direct road from there to Moscow passed.
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  • Balashev, who was on the alert all through the dinner, replied that just as "all roads lead to Rome," so all roads lead to Moscow: there were many roads, and "among them the road through Poltava, which Charles XII chose."
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  • Napoleon sat down, toying with his Sevres coffee cup, and motioned Balashev to a chair beside him.
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  • It seemed to him that he was surrounded by men who adored him: and he felt convinced that, after his dinner, Balashev too was his friend and worshiper.
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  • Balashev made no reply and bowed his head in silence.
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  • Has he not thought that I may do the same? and he turned inquiringly to Balashev, and evidently this thought turned him back on to the track of his morning's anger, which was still fresh in him.
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  • Balashev bowed his head with an air indicating that he would like to make his bow and leave, and only listened because he could not help hearing what was said to him.
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  • "Are the horses ready for the general?" he added, with a slight inclination of his head in reply to Balashev's bow.
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  • The letter taken by Balashev was the last Napoleon sent to Alexander.
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  • Just at the time Prince Andrew was living unoccupied at Drissa, Shishkov, the Secretary of State and one of the chief representatives of this party, wrote a letter to the Emperor which Arakcheev and Balashev agreed to sign.
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